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FBI digs up antiquated 1798 Law to demand smartphone data decryption from Google


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 04:01 PM

 

FBI, it seems has found out a loophole in antiquated law called All Writs Act,  through which it will call upon Google and Apple to produce decrypted data to them.  It has apparently filed a suit in against both the mobile manufactures and the court documents submitted by it prove how far FBI is willing to go to decrypt citizens’ data.

The paperwork has shown two cases where federal prosecutors have cited the All Writs Act – which was enacted in 1789 as part of the Judiciary Act – to force companies to decrypt information on gadgets. This 1798  Act, which was signed into law by none other than George Washington and later revised in the 20th century, gives the courts the right to…

FBI digs up antiquated 1798 Law to demand smartphone data decryption from Google and Apple

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#2 technonymous

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 05:05 PM

Even more of a reason to encrypt data. What part of private conversation do they not understand? You and a recipient should be able to carry on private conversation without some middle man listening in. Trade business secrets etc comes to mind. It's double standard, the government can classify it's secrets but the public can't. Just because there is a encrypted conversation doesn't mean something bad is happening. This was brought into law early on because the forefathers knew and understood that this would be a future problem. It only leads down one path and that path is tyranny. The first thing Adolf Hitler in Germany did was took control over the news papers of what they could print and tapped everyones phones. Sounds familiar doesn't it?






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