Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Diagnosing bad MB & determining compatibility of new MB w/ existing hardware


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 joey v

joey v

  • Members
  • 37 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 30 November 2014 - 10:26 AM

So I think my motherboard went bad.  I base this on the following

 

- the system had been working fine for years

- I grounded the green wire on the PSU, and the fans still get power (I assume problem is not PSU)

- I tried to boot with only 1 stick of RAM (tried different slots too)

- when I start the computer, fans/drives spin, but no signal gets to the monitors

- the green light on the MB is on, but no start-up beep is heard

- this is not the first time the MB has given me problems.  Sometimes booting up would require the OS cd in the drive (but would then boot normally)

 

So given that my assumption is correct and I do need a new MB, how do I determine what would fit w/ the rest of the hardware I have?  My computer is pretty old, so I know at least the RAM is going to require an upgrade (to DD3). 

 

Here's what I'm working with now (don't snicker, I know this is all dated hardware).

 

Nzxt Lexa Blackline Gaming Tower Case

ASUS M2N SLI AMD CPU Socket AM2 Motherboard

AMD AthlonT64 X2 6000+ Dual-Core CPU

4 x Corsair DDR2 XMS2 RAM

ATI Radeon video card

MSI K9N4 SLI-F NVIDIA nForce 500-SLI MCP Chipset?

 

So what criteria do I need to use in buying a new MB?  I figure I have to make sure it fits in my case, is compatible w/ the CPU (how do I do this?), and update the RAM.  What else?

 

Thanks ahead of time.

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by joey v, 30 November 2014 - 10:27 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 ElfBane

ElfBane

  • Members
  • 775 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 01 December 2014 - 03:36 AM

(you have 2 MBs on your list, BTW, what gives?)

 

If the MB has integrated graphics, then remove the vid-card and try the on-board graphics.

Let us know.



#3 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,345 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 01 December 2014 - 02:03 PM

Could still be a psu issue, fans are not specific about voltages. They will often still run even if a psu is partially bad. If you have a spare "known good" psu to test with that would quickly rule it out, or you could swap this psu into a different computer and see if that computer works with the psu.

 

Here are some other things to try:

 

I know you mentioned that you tried 1 stick of ram in each slot but if you have a different stick, test that in each slot as well.

 

Make sure you have the computer unplugged from power while removing or moving any hardware...

 

If you never get a stable system with just 1 stick of ram in 1 slot (trying all sticks by themselves) try removing all non essential hardware to get into bios:

 

Disconnect pci cards, pci-e cards - except a video card unless you have onboard in which case use the onboard video and pull the video card, hard drives, dvd drives, disconnect all usb headers as well. You should only have the power supply, main board, 1 stick of ram in 1 slot, the cpu and cpu cooler connected. You can also plug in a monitor and keyboard. Now try to power on the machine. If at this point you have no post screen or video etc, unplug the computer and pull the stick of ram, power back on and listen for a post fault beep code, you will need to hook up a motherboard speaker to hear any post fault code.

 

If you get no response next: remove all of the components from the computer case and connect only non essential hardware outside of the case, place the motherboard on a non conductive surface, a wooden table will do fine. Then try to power on again, you can short the power button pins on the motherboard, don't worry this is exactly what the power button does. Just touch a metal item to both power button pins to try to power the mainboard when outside of the computer case.

 

While you have the computer apart, look for blown or bulging capacitors on the mainboard and video cards etc examples: https://www.google.com/search?q=bulging+or+blown+capacitors+motherboard&noj=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=Iz_YU6aDLsS2yASnjoKwAQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1031&bih=603 please report any caps you suspect may be bad, you can take a picture and post here if you are unsure.


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#4 joey v

joey v
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 37 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 04 December 2014 - 05:44 PM

(you have 2 MBs on your list, BTW, what gives?)

 

If the MB has integrated graphics, then remove the vid-card and try the on-board graphics.

Let us know.

 

yeah, sorry... I've already replaced the mobo once.  the first one I listed (m2n-sli) is the one I have.  and MOBO does not have integrated graphics.

 

Could still be a psu issue, fans are not specific about voltages. They will often still run even if a psu is partially bad. If you have a spare "known good" psu to test with that would quickly rule it out, or you could swap this psu into a different computer and see if that computer works with the psu.

 

Here are some other things to try:

 

I know you mentioned that you tried 1 stick of ram in each slot but if you have a different stick, test that in each slot as well.

 

Make sure you have the computer unplugged from power while removing or moving any hardware...

 

If you never get a stable system with just 1 stick of ram in 1 slot (trying all sticks by themselves) try removing all non essential hardware to get into bios:

 

Disconnect pci cards, pci-e cards - except a video card unless you have onboard in which case use the onboard video and pull the video card, hard drives, dvd drives, disconnect all usb headers as well. You should only have the power supply, main board, 1 stick of ram in 1 slot, the cpu and cpu cooler connected. You can also plug in a monitor and keyboard. Now try to power on the machine. If at this point you have no post screen or video etc, unplug the computer and pull the stick of ram, power back on and listen for a post fault beep code, you will need to hook up a motherboard speaker to hear any post fault code.

 

If you get no response next: remove all of the components from the computer case and connect only non essential hardware outside of the case, place the motherboard on a non conductive surface, a wooden table will do fine. Then try to power on again, you can short the power button pins on the motherboard, don't worry this is exactly what the power button does. Just touch a metal item to both power button pins to try to power the mainboard when outside of the computer case.

 

While you have the computer apart, look for blown or bulging capacitors on the mainboard and video cards etc examples: https://www.google.com/search?q=bulging+or+blown+capacitors+motherboard&noj=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=Iz_YU6aDLsS2yASnjoKwAQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1031&bih=603 please report any caps you suspect may be bad, you can take a picture and post here if you are unsure.

 

So instead of all that, I bought a PSU tester and a MoBo tester.  Here are the results -

 

PSU tester -

 

+3.3V - good

-12V - good

PG - good

+5VSB - good

+12V - good

-5V - bad

+5V - good

 

see attached image.  Not sure if the -5V means anything....

 

MoBo tester -  (MOBO light is lit when power is on)

 

LED display - N/A

-12 V - LIT

+12V- LIT

+5V - LIT

+3.3V - NOT LIT

CLK- LIT

IRDY - NOT LIT

FRAME - NOT LIT

RESET - NOT LIT

 

So... what say you guys?

I've been doing a little research and it looks like the MOBO needs to be compatible with the case (ATX) - (so ATX or mini ATX or ITX or mini ITX) and the processer needs to be compatible with the MOBO (AMD vs INTEL), and RAM needs to be compatible with the MOBO (DDR2 vs DDR3, etc). 

 

Attached Files


Edited by joey v, 04 December 2014 - 05:47 PM.


#5 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,345 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 05 December 2014 - 09:16 AM

I am not one to trust psu testers, the problem is they do not put a load on the psu. Most of the time bad psu's I tested would pass a standard psu tester, but fail to power on a system. It wasn't until a load was put on it that problems showed up... I always recommend testing with a known good psu just to be certain.

 

As far as upgrades go: The cpu needs to be compatible with the board and socket type (AM2), most boards will give you specifications as to what cpu's are supported. I haven't recently seen any am2 boards that supported ddr3, I used to sell one that supported both ddr2 and ddr3. I haven't seen boards like that in a while, but I also haven't been specifically looking.

 

You likely wouldn't notice much difference going from ddr2 to ddr3 with your cpu, and personally if you go the ddr3 route, I would recommend you upgrade the cpu, motherboard, and ram at the same time.

 

If your case supports atx, I would go with an atx board.


Edited by zingo156, 05 December 2014 - 09:17 AM.

If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#6 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,777 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:12:11 AM

Posted 05 December 2014 - 09:28 AM

 

Socket AM2 Motherboard

This is the socket that any mobo you get absolutely must have. The socket is the mount that the CPU plugs in to (I'm sure you already know this, I am just being detailed  :) ).  Your CPU will not fit any other socket, and it must be an AMD, an Intel board will not work. Because of the age, there will not be many out there. Here is one I used recently to replace a mobo on an older unit, and it works great:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157274

In the CPU specs, note that your CPU socket is listed. You will be able to use your existing memory.

Since you have the same type of board, it will fit your case. Even if one mounting hole or so doesn't line up (not likely), most others will.

 

 

- when I start the computer, fans/drives spin, but no signal gets to the monitors

- the green light on the MB is on, but no start-up beep is heard

- this is not the first time the MB has given me problems.

Ok, good steps there. Try this again, only first disconnect all drives (HDD and DVD) and unplug anything in the USB ports. If you can, swap your video card with another, you don't have to install any drivers, we are just testing connections. Reset the BIOS back to default. A corrupted BIOS setting can prevent POST. Still nothing on the monitor and no beeps? I suspect that will be the case, but this is a good test. If so, the signal from the power supply is not reaching the BIOS, indicating a low-level mechanical failure.

A low-level boot failure is caused only by one of 4 things: a failed CPU, a failed mobo, bad power supply, corrupted or damaged BIOS. 

Percentage wise, very rarely will a CPU fail. In all my years in IT and building I have had only one CPU fail, and that is very unusual. However, motherboards fail constantly.

[EDIT]: Zingo just beat me to the Post button, I basically repeated his steps. Post back with any problems.


Edited by ranchhand_, 05 December 2014 - 09:33 AM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#7 joey v

joey v
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 37 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 05 December 2014 - 10:10 PM

woohoooo!  I took your advice and stared yanking everything.  still nothing.  I removed the single stick of RAM I left in and I got error beeps!!!  put in a different stick of RAM and I got a single success beep!  Eventually hooked everythign back up and added 3 of the 4 sticks of RAM.  I guess the single stick of RAM I left in was the bad one. 

 

I still need to update my system eventually, but at least this bought me some time!  Thanks guys!



#8 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,345 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:11 AM

Posted 06 December 2014 - 09:45 AM

Glad to help, ram is always a high suspect with post faults. Removing all of the ram and getting a beep code (ram related) actually suggests the board is working correctly. It does appear you have a bad stick of ram. Happy computing.


Edited by zingo156, 06 December 2014 - 09:47 AM.

If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users