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seagate internal hdd 2,5 inches high temp


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#1 paulos123

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 09:20 PM

hello guys i bought before 3 months a seagate 2,5inches 500gb hard drive for my laptop but its tempreture is always 44-50.

im worried cause its a lot.a wd scorpio blue i used to have was 5 degrees less.also i have 2 externals(seagate and hitachi)

and again only the seagate is on hign temp.is something wrong or to worry about

here is my system info...

 

thanks anyway

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/BqQC2340p8IQ7PlS0HxeGeo



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 09:25 PM

According to Seagate you are in the normal range of 5-50 degrees C.



#3 buddy215

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 10:32 PM

Google did a study on hard drives several years ago as reported at Google’s Disk Failure Experience

 

 

Just part of the article discussing Google's study:

Google released a fascinating research paper titled Failure Trends in a Large Disk Drive Population (pdf) at this years File and Storage Technologies (FAST ’07) conference. Google collected data on a population of 100,000 disk drives, analyzed it, and wrote it up for our delectation.

 

Sudden heat death?
One of the most intriguing findings is the relationship between drive temperature and drive mortality. The Google team took temperature readings from SMART records every few minutes for the nine-month period. As the figure here shows, failure rates do not increase when the average temperature increases. At very high temperatures there is a negative effect, but even that is slight. Here’s the graph from the paper:

afr_temp_age_dist.png

Drive age has an effect, but again, only at very high temperatures. Here’s that graph:

afr_temp.png

The Googlers conclude:

In the lower and middle temperature ranges, higher temperatures are not associated with higher failure rates. This is a fairly surprising result, which could indicate that data center or server designers have more freedom than previously thought when setting operating temperatures for equipment that contains disk drives.

Good news for internet data center managers.

The StorageMojo take
There is a lot here and the implications may surprise.

  1. Disk MTBF numbers significantly understate failure rates. If you plan on AFRs that are 50% higher than MTBFs suggest, you’ll be better prepared.
  2. For us SOHO users, consider replacing 3 year old disks, or at least get serious about back up.
  3. Enterprise disk purchasers should demand real data to back up the claimed MTBFs – typically 1 million hours plus – for those costly and now much less studied drives.
  4. SMART will alert you to some issues, but not most, so the industry should get cracking and come up with something more useful.
  5. Workload numbers call into question the utility of architectures, like MAID, that rely on turning off disks to extend life. The Googlers didn’t study that application, but if I were marketing MAID I’d get ready for some hard questions.
  6. Folks who plan and sell cooling should also get ready for tough questions. Maybe cooler isn’t always better. But it sure is a lot more expensive.
  7. This validates the use of “consumer” drives in data centers because for the first time we have a large-scale population study that we’ve never seen for enterprise drives.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#4 paulos123

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 09:07 AM

helpfull info,i have a program(hard drive inspector pro)that says:your disk is working in unknown,while the optimal mode is pio mode 2(8,3mb)this may cause reduce disk performance.



#5 hamluis

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 01:55 PM

No drive should be working PIO mode these days.

 

What is PIO - A Word Definition From the Webopedia Computer Dictionary - http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/PIO.html

 

DMA reverts to PIO Windows Problem Solver - http://winhlp.com/node/10

 

As previously stated...the consensus for hard drive temps is that anything 50 Celsius or less...is fine. 

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 01 December 2014 - 01:57 PM.


#6 paulos123

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 03:03 PM

thanks louis always helpfull






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