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Mp3 Compression


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#1 Osiris

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 11:20 PM

I was just wonder i dent know if there has been much topics on this but is there any possible way i could make mp3 files smaller ? so i could hole more songs on my mp3 player. I seen a few topics around but they didn't realy help me out if someone could point this out for me it would be greatly appreciated.



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#2 graveangel

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 10:27 AM

Hello Osiris

Yes you can shrink mp3 files to very small amounts than they probably are already on your mp3 player,but you need a music programme that is able to do it. I use Real Player,but you have to pay subscription to alter mp3s with it,but there are free programmes out there that also allow you to alter the file size. Try looking here,you will find what you need im sure,as well as other usefull free programmes:

Free Alternative Software

I think one that may work is 'Real Alternative', but maybe if you check it out you will find out more about it,as i have never used it.

The way mp3's can be altered is all to do with the bitrate (size you choose to copy the file). A decent sounding mp3 will be around 128kbps (kilo-bits per second). Most on my mp3 player,i have shrunk to 96kbps,but can get them down to about 24kbps. What this all means is if you record a 4 min song using 128kbps, the general rule is 1 min equals 1mb of space, so, the song would take up 4mb of space on your mp3 player. If you lower the recording down to 96kbps it will take up about 3.2mb of space.But if you take it right down to 24kbps, it will take up about 0.7mbs,saving over 3.3mbs in total,allowing more songs to be recorded.

The only problem is that the lower the kbps used,the poorer the playback. Id say 96kbps is good quality anything below 80 kbps and its starts to sound like audio tape,anything less than 50kbps and the poorer quality is easily noticable and poor.

Hope that helped explained how it works,anything else then just ask

Happy Browsing
:thumbsup:

Edited by graveangel, 18 June 2006 - 10:35 AM.

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#3 Osiris

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 05:51 PM

:thumbsup: Thanks ill take a look at that link you set up and i was wondering how would the sound be if i set it around 75kbs? Would the sound be as if there is more noise in it? Also if i lowered it to around 50 is there programs that would clear up the sound so it sounds almost of high quality and is a low file size?
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#4 tg1911

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 12:32 AM

128kbps is considered near CD quality.
96kbps is the same quality as an FM station with good reception.

Anything below that and you'll notice a definite drop off in sound quality.
No program can fix that.
When a music file is compressed, the program removes frequencies it considers unnecessary.
The more it's compressed, the more information that's removed from the original file.
The only way to improve the sound quality, would be to add the information that was removed, which can't be done, as the information is now lost.

You can try recording at lower bit rates and see what's acceptable quality, to you, but I'd do it on a copy of the file, and not the original.
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#5 nosnhoj#3

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 01:30 AM

Hello,

Just to add a bit to what has already been suggested. I totally agree with tg1911, and have a couple of recommendations to achieve Quality Encoded mp3 files.

It involves the use of two Free programs.

1. winLAME

2. MP3Gain

I wrote up a description of how to make quality CD's for my website, and explain how to use both programs, which will give you a basic explanation of how to normalize, and encode your tracks. Just dismiss the explanation of making the actual CD, and pay attention to the descriptions for the two programs I mention above. Here is a link to the page:

http://www.intellitorials.com/tutorials/audvid/cdburn.html


It is very important in my opinion that when encoding mp3 to a lower bit rate, that it is done so with as much precision as possible, and using the LAMEMP3 encoder will greatly increase your chances of this. Normalizing the tracks will take the annoying volume changes out of your tracks.


Hope this helps,


nos :thumbsup:
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#6 dc3

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 01:54 AM

128kbps is considered near CD quality.
96kbps is the same quality as an FM station with good reception.

Anything below that and you'll notice a definite drop off in sound quality.
No program can fix that.
When a music file is compressed, the program removes frequencies it considers unnecessary.
The more it's compressed, the more information that's removed from the original file.
The only way to improve the sound quality, would be to add the information that was removed, which can't be done, as the information is now lost.

You can try recording at lower bit rates and see what's acceptable quality, to you, but I'd do it on a copy of the file, and not the original.


Well stated! :thumbsup:

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#7 graveangel

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 09:15 AM

Hello again osiris,
You have had a few replies on this one already, and im sure you are well away now on sorting out your lossy compression.
As tg1911 well stated, once you drop the bitrate, you do just that, drop the bitrate. Mp3 compression removes sounds that the human ear cannot distinguish, unless it drops below 128kbps.
This when you consider that a normal 4min track on an audio compact disc,takes up around 40mbs of space (hence why you can only fit around 20 tracks on a cd when used as audio), and can be compressed by mp3 to be around only 4mb and still sound the same,is nothing less than impressive and evidence of advancement in technology.

You can make a back up of one of your tracks as suggested, and play about with it. You may find anything less than 96kbps is not for you,then again you might find that you are quite happy at dropping it down to 64kbps and therefore have room for twice as many songs as you have stored. Real Player lets the user right click on a track and compress it further,whilst it keeps the original bitrate track,untill or if you wish to delete it.

Have a go with the tools nos suggested,its all trial and error,thats learning.Im happy with Real Player,works well for me,others dont like it.So see what is best for your personal preferences,and if anymore questions,just ask!

And...lets us know how it all goes and what you decided on in the end! :thumbsup:
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#8 nosnhoj#3

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 11:57 AM

graveangel
Posted Today, 07:15 AM
Im happy with Real Player,works well for me,others dont like it.



Did you by any chance read this article recently published by PC World listing what they believe to be the worst 25 tech. products of all time? Here is the Link:
http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/article/0,a...g,2,00.asp#real

They have cleaned up the program quit a bit, but the last time I had it on my system, it seemed as though they were up to some of their old tricks, such as Registering file types, retrieving artist, album, and track info, and advertising way to much upon launching the program.

There are alternatives to actually having to use RealPlayer, like using Media Player Classic and installing the Real Alternative. This alleviates all the above annoyances, yet still allows you to handle RealMedia. I personally try and stay away from the titles that normally come bundled with Dell, Gateway and so on, and go for the Free Open Source titles that in most cases do the same thing, and sometimes even outperform the mainstream applications.


I just mention this because I think we should all be able to enjoy our Music and Movie preferences privately, without usage stats being sent back to companies that are only interested in the possibility of our business as well as other very annoying activities. It all basically adds up to an invasion of ones privacy if you ask me, but that is just my opinion.

nos :thumbsup:
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#9 graveangel

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 12:47 PM

nos, you are totally right and i had seen the article,which brought back memories! :thumbsup:
I appreciate your response on Real Player,it brings a smile to know everyone looks out for each other here, pro's for the newbies and even somtimes newbies for the pro's!

I dont subscribe to Real Players download sites, nor do i get any advertisements pop up,i basically altered the settings in there and it dosnt dial home. I guess i like it due to it being one of the first id used way back in 1999 upon release,and i can see the change quite easily being a user of it on certain systems,i was just never a fan of WMP and back then i didnt know of anything other than RP as an alternative to it. Gees, it really was a pretty annoying piece of kit looking back,but i dont feel so anymore,hence, after trying other products,ive gone back to it. Like you said though, some of the other free alternative programmes out there are excellent, and really can and do surpass commercial software on some points.

I just mention this because I think we should all be able to enjoy our Music and Movie preferences privately, without usage stats being sent back to companies that are only interested in the possibility of our business as well as other very annoying activities. It all basically adds up to an invasion of ones privacy if you ask me, but that is just my opinion.


and i could not agree more with you on this quote my friend, there is far too much spying going on as it is on the net,let alone to think software we trust and install on our systems is not doing a too different thing from the scum out there.

Edited by graveangel, 19 June 2006 - 01:07 PM.

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#10 Osiris

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 04:43 PM

It tends to get annoying its not only on the internet but even in the streets. I also downloaded the links you gave me for those to programs i might not know how to use them and just incase you didn't know i am not burning a cd or using anything to do with one i'm just trying to make the file size of my downloaded mp3's smaller and i havnt the slitest idea how o.O
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#11 tg1911

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 05:32 PM

Just make a copy of one of your music files.
Play around with the bit rates (quality), using winLAME, until you get a bit rate that is acceptable to you.
Convert your other files to the bit rate you've settled on.
(Here I would make copies of your music files to convert, then burn the originals to CD's as backups. That way, if you ever need the files with the original bit rates, you'll have them.)
Then use mp3Gain to normalize them.
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#12 nosnhoj#3

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 06:07 PM

It tends to get annoying its not only on the internet but even in the streets. I also downloaded the links you gave me for those to programs i might not know how to use them and just incase you didn't know i am not burning a cd or using anything to do with one i'm just trying to make the file size of my downloaded mp3's smaller and i havnt the slitest idea how o.O


Hello,

I know you are not trying to burn a CD, that is why I mentioned dismissing the explanation about doing so.

I wrote up a description of how to make quality CD's for my website, and explain how to use both programs, which will give you a basic explanation of how to normalize, and encode your tracks. Just dismiss the explanation of making the actual CD, and pay attention to the descriptions for the two programs I mention above. Here is a link to the page:




Here are some revised directions, to suit your needs.

Download and install the two programs, and make sure to have a shortcut handy for quick access.

Encoding your mp3 files to a lower bitrate

1. Double click the shortcut to winLAME.

2. A wizard like interface appears. Drag and drop all the tracks you want to encode into the winLAME window. Click Next.

3. Under Output Module, choose LAME mp3 Encoder, and Un-Tick the Warn about lossy transcoding box. Choose your desired Output Location, other than the folder they already reside in. I recommend making a new folder on your Desktop, and save all the tracks into it, that way they are all in the same spot. The other options are not necessary for completing the encoding. Click Next.

4. Highlight the Custom settings option from the list, and click Next.

5. Under Encoding Quality, choose High. Make sure that Bitrate is the selected option, and enter the bit rate that the target files will end up being, so if 128 is the target rate, enter 128 into the text area. Tick the Constant Bitrate option to the right of the bitrate you entered. Click Next.

6. Click the play button (first button on the left under Encode Control). The encoding will start. Let it finish and that's it, click finish.


To make all your tracks the same volume: (Optional)


1. Open mp3Gain, and click Add Folder. Then locate the folder with the tracks to be normalized and push OK. Now all the tracks should appear in the interface.

2. Click Track Analysis. The analysis begins, displaying information about the track to the right. Let the analysis complete, and you will notice that some track may have a red Y under the Clipping column. This is what we are correcting, you may have noticed before that when playing some tracks, the loud parts of certain songs seem to sound distorted. This process heals that.

3. Leave the Target "Normal" Volume at 89.0 DB, and if it is not already at that setting, change it. Now click Track Gain, and the normalization starts and quickly finishes.

4. Test a few of the tracks, and make sure the sound is to your liking, and if not you can go back and adjust the gain up or down to suit your needs.


Now put them on your player and enjoy.

Hope this helps,


nos
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#13 Osiris

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 08:11 PM

Ok thank you your instructions seem very straight forward when i get home to my pc ill get on make some back up files for my mp3's and test it out :thumbsup: If i have trouble ill let you know, thanks for all the input guys.
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#14 tg1911

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 08:47 PM

You're welcome, Osiris.
If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask.
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#15 nosnhoj#3

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 01:01 AM

Hello,

You are very welcome, and if you have a minute, I am curious to how much storage space your mp3 player allows? One of my specialties is cramming as many files onto whatever storage media I am working with, so there may or may not be another usefull tip for you depending on the amount of space.


nos :thumbsup:
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