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Some questions about the capabilities of linux operating systems


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#1 rp88

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 07:40 PM

I often hear of linux on here and all the good features it offers, how it gives more user control, better security and is apparently all-round easier to run, so i wanted to ask some questions about it. I'm not thinking of changing to it yet, but will need to have answers to these should i think of changing over in future. I have spend most of my life on xp computers before changing to a windows 8.0 laptop a year ago. I take graphical user interfaces for granted, i require compatibility for several programs and many file formats.




1) How can i run things like flash player for watching online video, is this possible on linux?


2) Are there some forms of online content that only work on windows, can they be made to wrok on linux? I hear things about silverlight and html 5 players which will refuse to run on linux. Do some websites lock down their content against linux users but let mac and windows users access it? If such locking down happens can linux users "beat" it and find a way to access the content despite the site's attempts to stop them?


3)I have some old programs i use which are no longer available for download, i have installers but they are installers designed for use in for windows(XP though thye work on windows 8 aswell) not in linux, can these be made/forced/beaten over the metaphorical head with a metaphorical hammer/persuaded/tweaked to run in linux? Two of the programs are exe files, one is a .bat script the foruth is a "plugin" using something called rb script which goes into one of the programs. This is an especially critical consideration for me.


4)How can one open common microsoft office (word, publisher,powerpoint,excel) formats? it is fine for a user to work in an open source format but when friends and colleagues send me things in microsoft office fomrats i need to be able to open them, read them, edit them and finally send them back in the same format.


5)How can one get other closed source file formats to open? In the case of there being no linux version of a program used to open them can a window exe program which opens them be made to run on linux?


6)Can linux read and write files to normal ntfs and fat32 formatted usb sticks?


7)Can linux read and write oridnary CD-RW discs, such as those that have been written on windows machines?


8)With the aid of a media player like VLC can linux play DVDs, or are there other driver/compatibility/software issues?


9)Can linux machines be connected to printers and other hardware which is designed to run with windows machines, or must linux machiens connect to specialised linux compatible peripherals?


10)Are there any tasks which are easy on windows computers but not on linux ones, are there any things that a user moving from windows would find themselves unable to do on linux?


11)Does using linux require use of a command line interface or can EVERYTHING be done from a grpahical user interface and the command line is just an alternative option for those who prefer typing commands to clicking icons?


12)Most hardware and computer accesories on sale in shops describe their compatibilities with windows and mac machines but don't mention linux, will they work with linux computers?


13)How much maintainance,updating,general fiddling with the system must a linux user do, once he has a configuration that he likes and his programs are running does he need to do regular administration stuff?


14)How can linux machines be kept secure? i know they are tougher against viruses than windows but i also know they are not immune.


15)Does using a linux computer mean the user must constantly modify things, edit parts of the system, make repairs, or is it a case of set it up once and never worry again?


16)How big a complication for setting up linux systems is the secure boot feature being built into modern computers?


17)Do linux computers suffer problems with setting up internet connections, such as when one first plugs in an ethernet cable or connects to wifi or a dongle and goes through sign-up processes and such?


18)Does using linux require a user to be an "advanced" user and to understand command line interfaces and be skilled enough to fix any problem a pc could encounter?


19) what is the file browser like on linux? is it just like finding a file in a windows directory or something a bit weirder?


20) is there a sort of "pecking order" of linux systems where users are supposed to switch to different ones as they get more experience, or is it just a matter of picking the correct operating system for you and then using it and installing new programs when you want to be able to do new things with it. Just like how on windows XP a user would stick with an xp operating system and when they wanted to do new stuff they would just browse the web and download and install new exe file programs.


21)is linux good for, slightly techier than average home users, or mainly for running on web servers rather than desktop/laptop personal computers?


22)does linux treat file types and extensions in the same way that windows does?


23)due to the number of differnet versions of linux that exist is it often hard to find support for problems which is relevant to your particular system type?


24)Does linux lack any abilities that windows xp or windows 8 systems have?

25) for formats like zip, 7z, jpg, png, gif, txt, pdf, avi, mpg, mp4, mp3, rar can these be downloaded from websites just like one does on windows?


If some of these questions sound stupid or obvious, remember i've heard OF linux, i haven't ever USED it yet.
Thanks

Edited by rp88, 26 November 2014 - 07:48 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

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#2 NickAu

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 08:23 PM

 
 

1) How can i run things like flash player for watching online video, is this possible on linux?

Easy. Firefox Chrome Chromium Opera all run on Linux. Pepperflash player.


 

2) Are there some forms of online content that only work on windows, can they be made to wrok on linux? I hear things about silverlight and html 5 players which will refuse to run on linux. Do some websites lock down their content against linux users but let mac and windows users access it? If such locking down happens can linux users "beat" it and find a way to access the content despite the site's attempts to stop them?

No. Never heard of such a thing happening.

   

    3)I have some old programs i use which are no longer available for download, i have installers but they are installers designed for use in for windows(XP though thye work on windows 8 aswell) not in linux, can these be made/forced/beaten over the metaphorical head with a metaphorical hammer/persuaded/tweaked to run in linux? Two of the programs are exe files, one is a .bat script the foruth is a "plugin" using something called rb script which goes into one of the programs. This is an especially critical consideration for me.

 
As a rule of thumb NO Windows software will run natively in Linux.  Yet there are way.
 

   

    4)How can one open common microsoft office (word, publisher,powerpoint,excel) formats? it is fine for a user to work in an open source format but when friends and colleagues send me things in microsoft office fomrats i need to be able to open them, read them, edit them and finally send them back in the same format.

Open Office Libre office.  Microsoft office.
 
 

How To Install Microsoft Office 2010 In Ubuntu With Wine - Linux .

 

   

    5)How can one get other closed source file formats to open? In the case of there being no linux version of a program used to open them can a window exe program which opens them be made to run on linux?

see above
 

 

    6)Can linux read and write files to normal ntfs and fat32 formatted usb sticks?

Yes.
 

 

    7)Can linux read and write oridnary CD-RW discs, such as those that have been written on windows machines?

Yes.
 

 

    8)With the aid of a media player like VLC can linux play DVDs, or are there other driver/compatibility/software issues?

Yes easy.
 

 

    9)Can linux machines be connected to printers and other hardware which is designed to run with windows machines, or must linux machiens connect to specialised linux compatible peripherals?

Yes in 99.99% of the time.
 

   

    10)Are there any tasks which are easy on windows computers but not on linux ones, are there any things that a user moving from windows would find themselves unable to do on linux?

Yes ..... Get malware on PC.
 

    

    11)Does using linux require use of a command line interface or can EVERYTHING be done from a grpahical user interface and the command line is just an alternative option for those who prefer typing commands to clicking icons?

No. Most distros can be point and click. Terminal is just easier once you know how.
 

 


    12)Most hardware and computer accesories on sale in shops describe their compatibilities with windows and mac machines but don't mention linux, will they work with linux computers?

Simple answer YES.

 


    13)How much maintainance,updating,general fiddling with the system must a linux user do, once he has a configuration that he likes and his programs are running does he need to do regular administration stuff?

None. You do not defragment Linux it dont need it . As for malware scanning with anti spyware stuff ...... What's that Whats a Virus?

    


    14)How can linux machines be kept secure? i know they are tougher against viruses than windows but i also know they are not immune.

Dont run as root. No they are not immune however the avarage user will most likley not be able to infect their machine easily.

    


    15)Does using a linux computer mean the user must constantly modify things, edit parts of the system, make repairs, or is it a case of set it up once and never worry again?

Once its set up there is nothing to do. Do you know some machines run for years without a reboot.

    


    16)How big a complication for setting up linux systems is the secure boot feature being built into modern computers?

None at all i run Ubuntu on an i5, Ubuntu supports secureboot.

    


    17)Do linux computers suffer problems with setting up internet connections, such as when one first plugs in an ethernet cable or connects to wifi or a dongle and goes through sign-up processes and such?

No.
In most cases its easier than Windows.
 

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    18)Does using linux require a user to be an "advanced" user and to understand command line interfaces and be skilled enough to fix any problem a pc could encounter?

It helps but No. You can always get help on a forum.

   


    19) what is the file browser like on linux? is it just like finding a file in a windows directory or something a bit weirder?

There are many, Each distro has its own However If you want it to look like Windows it can.

    


    21)is linux good for, slightly techier than average home users, or mainly for running on web servers rather than desktop/laptop personal computers?

Perfect for home users.

    


    22)does linux treat file types and extensions in the same way that windows does?

No and thats a good thing.

    


    23)due to the number of differnet versions of linux that exist is it often hard to find support for problems which is relevant to your particular system type?

Look at it this way it dont matter if its Ubuntu Kubuntu Lubuntu Linux mint basically its all Ubuntu under the bonnet and the same commands work across distros.

    


    24)Does linux lack any abilities that windows xp or windows 8 systems have?

Yes the ability to run malware LOL.

The above answers are the quick and simple version and would apply to most home users. I know others will hit you with more details on each question but at the end of the day my answers will still apply.

My suggestion is to get a Buntu depending on PC specs and install it to usb and run it that way.



#3 wizardfromoz

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 08:37 PM

hi rp88 we've met before - you were my first reply at Beat The Blackhats, in General Security.

 

Q. 25 - Yes - .png is used as a default over .jpg

 

There is also a Q. 0) - Can I "try before I buy"? Answer - Yes. We don't buy Linux but you can use a process called LiveCD (usually a DVD) or LiveUSB, which can be used for most of the Distros to run Linux, get the feel of them, etc, before committing to installing. When you have finished with it you just eject the medium and you have Windows back.

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#4 buddy215

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 08:56 PM

You are not a prime candidate for using a Linux machine. If you are proficient in using Microsoft office products and

don't want to spend time learning a different program....forget Linux. Of course, you can use Wine or some other

strategy to use those programs....but what would be the point?

 

If you still have that old XP machine around then it could be brought back to life with a well supported, secure Linux

distro such as Ubuntu or one of its less demanding spinoffs. That's the quickest way to get the "feel" for Linux.

I have a 9 year old Dell desktop with Ubuntu installed on it. Boots in under a minute to Firefox. A really nice backup.

I have another 14 year old Compaq with a Puppy Linux installed on it. Amazing to see that old machine pump out

video with exacting colors. Better than the Windows 2000 did. It's really just a conversation piece...keeps the closet

carpet dust free where it sits.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#5 NickAu

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 11:12 PM

buddy215 makes  good points.

I am not suggesting you nuke Windows and switch to Linux , What I am suggesting is that you give Linux a try, Use it for day to day stuff, Surfing the net, Checking email, The basics at first then as time progresses you can decide.
Try it from USB for a few months, The upside is you learn something new and you may like Linux. The down side? well at worst you waste a few hours playing with Linux and return to Windows.



#6 Al1000

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 12:59 AM

That's a great idea. You might decide to stick with Windows, you might decide to move to Linux; or you might decide to continue using both, like I do. Although it's now been a few weeks since I booted into Windows, it's there for when I want it.

 

When I started using Linux earlier this year, and knowing next to nothing about it, I installed Ubuntu to a small partition on my hard drive and just used it occasionally to try it out, browsing the internet and installing free software from the repositories (the concept of centralised software might be alien to Windows users (and the concept of free centralised software might be alien to Mac users)), continuing to use Windows for most things.

 

As I learned more about Linux and its advantages over Windows, I gradually started using Linux more and Windows less, and now I use Linux for all but a couple of applications. I don't personally see the point in trying to tweak Windows applications to run in Linux, when you already have Windows anyway, and of course some Windows applications just won't work on Linux no matter.. Similarly apart from for security reasons, I don't see the point of using Windows emulators to run Windows programs in Linux, when you could run them in Windows without the emulator. Unless of course it's just for fun, and I do have an old Windows game installed to a DOS emulator on Linux.

 

I also used to think much the same way as you regarding the terminal, in that I thought it was something that was best avoided, and that GUI is always better. But after some experience with using it, I have now come to realise some of the advantages that the terminal has over the GUI, and now use it not just for things that the GUI can't do, but for things that it can do as well, and also find the terminal easier to use for many things. But I still use the GUI for most things, and regard having it and the terminal as having the best of both worlds, much like having Windows as well as Linux is.

 

One thing I have noticed is that while many Windows users migrate to Linux, the same doesn't seem to happen in reverse. I don't ever recall having seen a thread in a Windows forum by a Linux user, for example asking if Linux software will work on Windows, or if Windows will be able to read Linux file systems etc, whereas threads such as this by Windows users appear frequently in Linux forums.

 

PS: please don't take that the wrong way - personally I welcome threads like this, and am happy to try to persuade Windows users to try Linux. :)


Edited by Al1000, 27 November 2014 - 01:01 AM.


#7 cat1092

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 01:54 AM

I agree also with buddy 215, and with the answers that Nick & Al posted to your questions. 

 

And as I do with others, I never advise nuking a supported Windows install (remember that XP doesn't fall into that category), but rather begin running from install media, which doubles as a Live DVD, or to run faster, from a bootable Flash drive. Universal USB Installer is one good option for creating Flash drive installer, and the one I use. 

 

Most daily tasks, such as browsing the Internet, checking email, watching YouTube videos, using VLC to listen to music or video playback, and even using Skype (yes, there's a Linux version), appears no different than on a Windows computer, and may actually look (& run) better on some machines while doing it. 

 

Recalling some of your past content, you have some mission critical software that requires the use of Windows 8 (keep in mind the January 12, 2016 support deadline). That being the case, then you'll either want to run Linux on another computer, which is be the best option if available, or run Linux in a virtual machine using VirtualBox or VMWare Player. I suggest the virtual machine approach over dual boot, at least until you feel comfortable. Your CPU & amount of installed RAM will play a huge part in how well a VM will perform, so consider machine specs before doing this. 

 

While there are ways of running some Windows software through WINE, it's best to get a feel for the OS first, and at least become comfortable with running Linux. 

 

Like I tell everyone, LInux Mint is as close as a drop in replacement for Windows as it gets, with the Start Menu being in the same area as Windows 7 & below, and things being easy to find. You can install Google Chrome to have a 2nd browser, and if you're currently using that or Firefox (the default), if you're signed into a Google Account or Firefox Sync, your bookmarks & most of your add-ons will install to Linux. Except add-ons incompatible with Linux, however most are. 

 

There is no option to install IE, other than through the WINE software, and I'll tell it like it is, the experience isn't the same as on a Windows machine. I haven't tried MS Office on WINE, so cannot tell you one way or the other, but MS Office 2010 & under works on WINE. There is also Office Online, a free service accessed through the MSN or Bing homepage, that can be used on Firefox or Chrome. Haven't used that either, on Windows or Linux, so don't know much about it, other than it has limitations, even on Windows. 

 

You can still access & use your Outlook.com email address on Linux, which is my default for business, and all of my things of importance is done on Linux. Even Turbo Tax online works with Linux, it's browser based. Anything that you can do on a browser using Windows, other than that requiring IE, can be done on Linux. 

 

Now for the quirks, which for me, is a very short list, and contains one item, printing. And most of this isn't due to LInux, it's due to my choice of printer in 2010. Many newer HP printers runs quite well on Linux, and is highly recommended, though it's best to get a list to see which current ones are best. There are others that works fine, it's just that many Linux users who prints a lot (I don't) recommends HP printers over the rest. I cannot vouch for that, as I don't have one of the brand, am only reporting what I've read from many Linux tutorials & from forum content. 

 

However, you can test you printer through running the LIve DVD, by running the test page, which usually looks good on mine, but also an item such as an email, to make sure that what you want to print is as should be. That's what I don't understand about mine, how can it print a test page near perfect, but not a receipt or email? 

 

Fortunately, I don't need to print a lot, because these days, receipts goes to my email box anyway, where I can easily print these on Windows if needed. 

 

One last thing & I'm out of here, Linux Mint runs on half or less of the resources that a Windows install requires. For one who does nothing except Web browsing, even on a 64 bit computer, 4GB RAM is more than enough, my system idles at less than 700MB, and that's 64 bit Linux Mint. Your computer will feel like a new one again, everything is fast and very responsive. 

 

That's my two cents worth, and if you have further questions, feel free to ask. That's what we're here for. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 27 November 2014 - 02:26 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 02:20 AM

+1 :thumbup2: cat1092, Al1000, and NickAu1

 

 

I never advise nuking a supported Windows install

 

I did, but it is not for the faint-hearted, and I had backups if there was data I needed.That now resides on my external HDD and I can pluck what Windows material I need from it, when I need it. I have been in this situation for 4 months now, haven't missed Windows one bit.

 

Worked with Open Office Suite for 10 years now, as a preference to MS Office, under Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 and then Linux. Only switched to Libre Office 5 or 6 weeks ago, after morphing 2 Distros, which rendered OO retired, for me (Libre Office forked from Open Office). Word Processing? Piece of cake. Reading and writing MS-compatible docs, likewise. Only way you might notice a difference is if you're a spreadsheeter using formulae generated under Excel, or perhaps Presentations and the like cf Powerpoint or whatever. And the gap narrows nearly every day.

 

I would go the Live option, you can pop it out any time you like and resume Windows, and use it to install any time you are convinced. Unless you wish to play with Virtual environments, which can  be fun too.

 

And as Nick has said:

 

 

The down side? well at worst you waste a few hours playing with Linux and return to Windows.

 

Enjoy

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

Edited typo


Edited by wizardfromoz, 27 November 2014 - 02:22 AM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 02:51 AM

 

 

Unless you wish to play with Virtual environments, which can  be fun too.

 

Yes these can indeed be fun, and I was deep into VM's for a couple of years, eventually I burned out on those. However I do use these as a final test of a new OS before install, and keep a few handy just to have one, should it become needed. One can get a lot done using virtual machines, which is why many workplaces uses these, one employee can perform the work of four who were running XP Pro Workstations, keeping employees productive & away from the coffee pot & chit-chatting. 

 

And the other benefit of a VM is that when it's no longer needed, in 2-3 clicks, it's all gone (with VirtualBox). Workplaces are likely using Hyper-V or a VMWare Workstation option. 

 

The main reason I suggest these on the forum is to try out new OS's before the install. That gives the user the chance to decide whether or not a particular OS is the right one. 

 

Am in the process of deciding on how I'm going to deploy Linux Mint 17.1 (RC), onto my main PC. Will likely setup a few popular VM's to be able to assist members w/out having to fire up another machine, which may be using the same monitor, something that's a pain in the rear to do, but I have moved one machine to another monitor, which will improve things a lot. 

 

EDIT: To the above, I'll be running dual monitors, my PC is capable of it. VM's can be setup to run on another monitor, through the VBox controls for each one. I have a spare 19" NEC MultiSync, that's capable of 1280x1024 (I believe I got that right) through DVI-D or VGA, though I believe the latter won't be necessary. DVI-D should be fine. This will allow me to enjoy both my main (or host) monitor in full, while doing the same for VM's. Don't laugh, this monitor sold for $750 new in 2003 & isn't cheap ABS plastic. This monitor has a steel frame & stand. It has some features that just as good as lower end ones of today. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/NEC-1960NX-BK-LCD-Monitor-Black/dp/B0000C1IA5

 

rp88, I believe that you may like Linux Mint, running on LIve DVD, it's really a fantastic OS for a newbie to run, and easy to do many things. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 30 November 2014 - 04:53 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 rp88

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 01:38 PM

Wow, this thread has generated quite a sizeable discussion.


I'll respond to the posts made one by one...


NickAu1: second post:Thanks for your answers can you tell me more about 3. Regarding 3 if anyone is a real expert in making windows software run on linux then i could send (somehow) in a 7z folder the exe(and bat) files for the programs with instructions on how they all operate on windows. But i wouldn't accept exe files sent to me by someone so i wouldn't expect anyone to volunteer that can kind of service and be willing to look at exe files sent by me. I won't be offended by anyone who answers that specific comment with a four letter word beginning with an f followed by a three letter word beginning with an o.
You didn't answer question 20 or 25 though.
Also question 14, what about "drivebys" and such, can they attack linux or is it only susecptible to viruses which come from deliberately running a program from an untrusted source.
Also question 10(and 24), jokes aside, is there anything else (good things) that a windows useer can do but a linux one can't.
Question 9, how can a buyer tell whether the thing he is buying is in that 0.01 percent.
And regarding 22, please explain more.
Thanks


Wizardfromoz:third post:Please explain what you are trying to say in question 25, do you mean linux will convert jpegs to png automatically or something? I was just asking whether for the purposes of downloading things other than programs can a user go to a site clcik a link and download a file the way a user does in firefox, internet explorer or chrome on a window machine?


Buddy215:fourth post: I'm not planning to switch soon, but i am thinkling when windows 8 reaches it's end i might want to move away from windows, it looks to me like windows is veering towards more and more "tablety" operating systems, i don't like that trend and expect that by the time windows 8 reaches it's end of support then linux might be the only way to have a real personal computer where the user is in control of the software, not the other way round. I'm currently just thinking about linux for the (not too soon) future, as i said i expect by the time windows 8 reaches it's end that linux might be the only option left that offers the (equal or greater)levels of user control than xp did, tablet like systems don't offer the user much. This isn't an urgent matter, it's considering things that are quite a way off.


NickAu1:fifth post:thanks for your tips, as i said in reponse to buddy215 this is about future stuff, not about making a switch next month or anything that soon.


AI1000:sixth post:Thanks for sharing your experiences, good to know how you found/are finding the conversion.
Regarding "One thing I have noticed is that while many Windows users migrate to Linux, the same doesn't seem to happen in reverse. I don't ever recall having seen a thread in a Windows forum by a Linux user, for example asking if Linux software will work on Windows, or if Windows will be able to read Linux file systems etc, whereas threads such as this by Windows users appear frequently in Linux forums." that's probably because people always learn windows first, the first computers they encounter are windows, so people might need to work out how to migrate windows programs onto linux to continue their workflow if thye switch, but linux users obviously aren't switching back, or if they are they are doing it so soon that they don't think "i really want to bring X back to windows". It might indicate pretty high satisfacton amongst those who do learn linux.


cat1092:post7:I had no plans to annhilate windows soon, i'm just thinking about in future. If i start on using linux at some point i will make sure to run from a live USB not to immediately wipe windows and install linux over it. those programs i mention are indeed my "mission critical" ones, the thing is in the context of this i'm thinking about in the long term future so while running windows for them on a virtual machine within linux, or running them with "wine" might be possible running a linux VM on a windows machine wouldn't be, because i'm wondering whether i would switch to linux in the far future. Two of them are pretty processor/memory intensve as thye are 3d computer modelling and animation programs, so that tip about VMs being very dependent on avilable memory will be pretty important if i do switch to linux and try that method. Email would be no trouble for me, i accces gmail via chrome web browser, i know i could alss access it via firefox if i needed. IE is not a program i use so i wouldn't be bothered about aht not runing on linux, it's other windows programs(programs that run on a windows OS, not neccessarily programs that are made by microsoft) that are important to me.


wizardfromoz:post8:"And the gap narrows nearly every day." do you mean that day by the open source equivalents of MS offie become more like it and more compatible, or do you mean something else?


cat1092:post9:thanks for the info.

Edited by rp88, 27 November 2014 - 01:41 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#11 NickAu

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 03:37 PM

 

NickAu1: second post:Thanks for your answers can you tell me more about 3

You can use Wine.  WineHQ - Run Windows applications on Linux, BSD, Solaris ... However this can be hit and miss.

The other alternative is Virtual machine, You install VM in Linux then install Windows in VM.

 

 

20) is there a sort of "pecking order" of linux systems where users are supposed to switch to different ones as they get more experience,

Yes. Most people start with a distro that gets recommended to them on a forum then they experiment, I started with Linux Mint 12 and tried a few distros then I found Kubuntu and Puppy Linux.

 

 

Also question 14, what about "drivebys" and such, can they attack linux or is it only susecptible to viruses which come from deliberately running a program from an untrusted source.

These are very rare indeed,  with basic precautions the average home user has little chance of infecting Linux without trying. What's a virus?  As for running programs from untrusted sources, That is a bad idea regardless of Operating System. And why would you want to when the Linux repo has some 70 000 bits of software and its all free and clean.

 

 

 

Also question 10(and 24), jokes aside, is there anything else (good things) that a windows useer can do but a linux one can't.

This is a hard question for me to answer as I do not use Windows at all and to be honest I have forgotten.

 

 

Question 9, how can a buyer tell whether the thing he is buying is in that 0.01 percent.

You take the chance I guess. I havent found anything that just wont run with Linux. I even use my Iphone. I can tether it , put music on it.

 

 

22)does linux treat file types and extensions in the same way that windows does?

 

 

What is a File Extension? By Grinler



#12 rp88

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 06:09 PM

Thanks i recognise more or less everything said in that article(i might have to send the link to it to some friends i know, they have fallen for false file extensions a few times and it explains the concept pretty well) by grinler, it explains file extensions and types very well for windows but makes no mention of linux(and doesn't say much about mac either). I am very familiar with the idea of particular file extensions being for particular uses and that one can set defaults as to what program opens what file type, does this principle carry over into linux or does another method of classing files come into play there? from what you've already said i can clearly see that exe and sscr files (for example) won't do anything on linux, but will other file types like pdf, jpg, gif, zip, 7z,avi,mpg act in the same sort of way as they do on windows?


Regarding "And why would you want to when the Linux repo has some 70 000 bits of software and its all free and clean.", that sounds quite a good range, will any linux system be able to run any of those programs or is it a system where most of those programs will only run on 1 particular distro(that's like types of linux isn't it, of different versions with a different users in mind)? Also do you get loads of "prerequisite" issues, i heard something once about linux machines sometimes getting loops where "you need B to install A, but B requires C to be installed and C rquires A". other than those few mission critical programs i have it sounds like there would hopefully be all the programs available for anything else i could ever want.

Edited by rp88, 27 November 2014 - 06:09 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#13 NickAu

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 06:21 PM

 

that sounds quite a good range, will any linux

If its in the Distro's repository then it will work with that distro. Unlike other App stores ( Windows Android Iphone ) the software in the Linux repos is checked before its released. 

 

 

"prerequisite" issues, i heard something once about linux machines sometimes getting loops where "you need B to install A, but B requires C to be installed and C rquires A".

That can happen with Puppy Linux where you may need to add dependencies, On the major Distros it's not an issue.

 

 

 

i might have to send the link to it to some friends i know, they have fallen for false file extensions a few times

 

While this is just a joke, This is what it would take to install a virus on Linux from source.

 

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A JOKE A GAG SOME FUN Linux users will see the funny side of this

 


“ Memo to Linux users, Why GNU/Linux Viruses are fairly uncommon” from Charlie Harvey

 

Product name evilmalware 0.6 (beta)

Copyright 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005 E\/17 |-|4><0|2z Software Foundation, Inc.

This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. There is NO warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY, COMPLETE DESTRUCTION OF IMPORTANT DATA or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE (eg. sending thousands of Viagra spams to people accross the world).

 

 

Basic Installation

 

Before attempting to compile this virus make sure you have the correct version of glibc installed, and that your firewall rules are set to ‘allow everything’.

  1. Put the attachment into the appropriate directory eg. /usr/src.
  2. Type ‘tar xvzf evilmalware.tar.gz’ to extract the source files for this virus.
  3. ‘cd’ to the directory containing the virus' source code and type ‘./configure’ to configure the virus for your system. If you're using ‘csh’ on an old version of System V, you might need to type ‘sh ./configure’ instead to prevent ‘csh’ from trying to execute ‘configure’ itself.
  4. Type ‘make’ to compile the package. You will need to be logged in as root to do this.
  5. Optionally, type ‘make check_payable’ or here_are_my_bank_details to run any self-tests that come with the virus, and send a large donation to an unnumbered Swiss bank account.
  6. Type ‘make install’ to install the virus and any spyware, trojans pornography, toolbars, adverts Key Loggers and DDoS attacks that come with it.
  7. You may now configure the way you want the malware to behave  look and more in /etc/evilmalware.conf.

Edited by NickAu1, 27 November 2014 - 06:25 PM.


#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 02:44 AM

rp88, hi

 

Wizardfromoz:third post:Please explain what you are trying to say in question 25, do you mean linux will convert jpegs to png automatically or something? I was just asking whether for the purposes of downloading things other than programs can a user go to a site clcik a link and download a file the way a user does in firefox, internet explorer or chrome on a window machine?

and

 

 

wizardfromoz:post8:"And the gap narrows nearly every day." do you mean that day by the open source equivalents of MS offie become more like it and more compatible, or do you mean something else?

 

1st one:

 

No. If you need a little more info about the differences between some of the major image formats, try this here, it is dated but still relevant http://www.practicalecommerce.com/articles/1821-Image-Formats-What-s-the-Difference-Between-JPG-GIF-PNG-

 

If you seek to download image files you can download all of the major recognised types as you did/do with Windows. You can likewise view them using your Distribution's installed image viewer, as with that of Windows. Internet Explorer is not supported under Linux for obvious reasons, but you can run it under a VM environment. All the other major browsers can run under Linux.

 

By “default” I was referring to when you take screenshots, perhaps to post here, or email, or upload. Your Linux Distro will have an installed screenshot applet, quite often called Screenshot, or else you may choose alternatives such as Shutter, &c. Shutter is available in the Ubuntu official Repositories. Screenshot's default is to save the image as .png.

 

.jpg often compresses better (except with small and simple images, where .png is better), but it is lossy. A simple rule of thumb is that PNG works best for vector type graphics with hard lines. JPG works best for anything with complex gradients (eg, a photo).

 

For purposes of posting a screenshot to this Forum, showing us what is happening on your PC, PNG is likely better.

 

I note that you have nearly 800 posts under your belt, but do not know whether you have posted a screenshot to this site before. If you need help, try reading here, the Post by Moderator Stolen: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/536686/how-do-i-post-a-screen-shot/?hl=%2Bimgur+%2Btinypic+%2Bphotobucket#entry3386653

 

I use Imgur, Nick uses TinyPic, Cat uses Photobucket. Pick one and try it.

 

2nd one:

 

Not quite. I was referring to the non-word-processing components of productivity suites, including spreadsheet, database, presentations. Word Processors incorporated under both Libre Office and its parent Open Office stand tall compared with Word, although the ultimate Word Processor was Word Perfect, both then and now (if challenged, I will start a new Topic).

 

Later, gotta make me Missus a cuppa, up from her nap.

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#15 pcpunk

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 01:22 PM

rp88, I have been dual booting since June.  I don't do virus scans, no maintenance accept for Auto Updates that one has to accept and install easily.  I'm not a computer guy, I'm lazy, and I have not had any issues with virus or anything else for that matter.  I use the same USB and HDD for keeping all my Word Documents(XP or Linux) on and haven't had an issue yet, most of them were from my xp install.  They are just simple documents no experience with Exel etc.  They sometimes need to be converted but it has been sufficient so far.  I really need to look into this further but haven't had the time or need yet.  

 

Just IMO, I think you should try Linux sooner rather than later, that way it will be a smooth gradual transition whether it be a Live DVD/CD, USB, or a dual boot.  If you dual boot, you have your W8 and a Linux Distro on the same computer.  Either way, you will be able to send documents to yourself via email, via Linux, reboot into Windows and check if you can open them without issue, and try out the software you were mentioning.  This link might be of interest to you:  http://www.datamation.com/applications/100-open-source-replacements-for-expensive-applications-3.html

 

P.S. Remember the LiveUSB is faster than the DVD/CD imo and ime, and VERY EASY to make.  I would "install" to a USB with a Linux Mint Distro(XP friendly) rather than JUST a standard LiveUSB.   This way you can SAVE software and documents to the USB so that you can actually come back later and keep learning.  This will require a download of your Distro/ISO of choice>burn to  DVD/CD>then install to USB.  I did not like the traditional LiveUSB where you cannot SAVE anything because of this and found it limiting in the learning process.  cat1092 advised me to just "Install" to the USB as one would do with a HDD and that was a big help in determining whether or not I like the distro.  See ya, pcpunk  


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