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Keeping computer safe for autistic daughter


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#1 Shelley6324

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:24 PM

My daughter is in her early 20s and has autism. She no longer lives with us. She loves to use her computer, and uses it to connect with people on Facebook and other sites. Unfortunately, but we have two problems:

 

1. Despite having Norton on her computer, the computer frequently gets viruses and adware.  Every once in a while, we take her computer in to our local "computer guy" and have the hard drive wiped clean and Windows reinstalled. She doesn't have any important documents or anything worth saving on her computer, but obviously reformatting the hard drive is expensive and a hassle. I believe the computer gets infected because she plays a lot of games, and anytime she downloads a game, she clicks "yes" to everything that comes with it.

 

Is there any way to make her unable to download things she couldn't?  I once had a net nanny program on her computer, but she a) complained it wouldn't let her download games, and B) she figured out the password.  She is running Windows 7.

 

2. She has broken 5 LCD monitors in a 4-month period. She has thrown her mouse and keyboard at the monitor, thrown the monitor itself, and hit the monitor.  She gets mad at a game or gets frustrated, and takes it out on the monitor. After monitor #3, I had a piece of plexiglass made to fit the front of monitor #4, then used a c-clamp to attach the base of the monitor to her desk.  I was pretty proud of myself.  Then she broke the monitor off the base!  Luckily I found a source for $8 monitors.  Monitor #5 lasted two days before she broke it, too, off the c-clamped base.

 

Any ideas for a better way of securing the monitor and keeping it safe from her tantrums?

 

Thank you so much for your input!  I would love to be able to prevent these problems before they happen.

--Shelley



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:44 PM

You can look at the free software called K9 to prevent her from downloading things. Maybe you have already tried this. As far as the monitor, the only thing I think would prevent the problem would be to put the monitor in a plexiglass case. Then mount the case to the table. Something like this  or this



#3 Shelley6324

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 04:49 PM

Thank you so much! The plexiglass cases are exactly what I had in mind, but couldn't find. I am not familiar with K9, but will try it out.  Thanks!



#4 quietman7

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 05:32 PM

This is a list of resources and tips for parents.

Resources for Parents: Child Safety on the Internet:Resources for Parents: Social Networking and Children:Parental Tools from Microsoft:Parental Tools to restrict access to the Internet and monitor child activity:Other Restrict Internet Access Resources:Tools for parents who want to know what web sites kids are using:Tools for parents who want to know what instant messengers kids are using, see who your kids are chatting with on MySpace and what pages they are looking at:Note: Not all parental tools are free but some parents find them worth the price so I included them in case you want to pursue that avenue.

Also keep in mind that some parental tools are considered Keylogging tools and may at times be detected by your anti-virus as a "RiskTool", "Hacking tool, or "Potentially unwanted tool". Anti-virus programs cannot distinguish between "good" and "malicious" use of such programs, therefore they may alert the user or even remove them. Such programs may have legitimate uses in contexts where an authorized user, parent or administrator has knowingly installed it. Potentially unwanted does not necessarily mean the file is malware or a bad program. It means it has the potential for being misused by others.
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#5 Animal

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 06:25 PM

In addition to the excellent suggestions already given. Something else you may consider is Deep Freeze. Every reboot returns the computer to it's original state.

It's not free. But should be far less expensive than repeated trips for wipe and reinstalls.

Take a look and see if this might be another layer of protection for you.

Faronics Deep Freeze Standard

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#6 quietman7

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 07:28 PM

Good one Animal...I forgot about Deep Freeze.

Alternatives to Deep Freeze
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