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How user-friendly is Puppy in comparison to Ubuntu and Mint etc?


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#1 Al1000

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 08:23 AM

This thread is to continue a discussion that began here, to prevent taking the other thread further off-topic.

First of all we have established that there are many differences between Puppy and other popular Linux distros, and that Puppy is not a good choice for a beginner who wants to learn about Linux. But the point in question here is as the title of the thread says, and here are a couple of points I raised as to why I think Puppy is more user-friendly than other Linux distros.
 

 

90% of what you would learn on Puppy would not apply to the majority of the rest of the Community.


Indeed, and if the OP had asked for recommendations of what distro to go for in order to learn about Linux, I wouldn't have recommended Puppy.

I have only been using Linux for a matter of months, but I found Puppy to be relatively beginner friendly. For example, how is a beginner supposed to know how to enable the firewall in Ubuntu? Whereas in Puppy, you just check a box, then press enter a couple of times when advised to do so.

How about searching for a file? I'm not sure how a beginner would be expected to know how to use the locate or find commands in a terminal, but the GUI file finding applications in Puppy are as simple as can be.

These are examples of ways in which I have found Puppy to be easier to use as a beginner, and more user friendly, than larger Linux distros such as Ubuntu and Mint.

I would be interested to hear, and it may of course also be of benefit to the OP, what you have found to be "not user friendly" about Puppy, and in what ways it's "not made for the average user."

 


Here is the response to my post, which I will respond to below:
 

I see, I would still warn them about Puppy but if you wouldn't suggest it normally then good to know.

Linux itself is a Firewall, you don't actually need one but lets say you want one anyway. If that is the case then you should use http://gufw.org/ because this application is super simple to use and is included in the official repo of every distro.

File Managers have this built-in...whether you use Nemo in Linux Mint or Nautilus in Ubuntu or etc in whatever you get all the benefits of file managment with a GUI...No Terminal Needed. Ubuntu MATE actually comes with an application for File Searching as well as a File Manager.

You may have found Puppy to be easier because someone seems to have had you approach the other distros in a weird manner which if you had someone who approached you as a new-to-Linux user then you would have never experienced any of these issues.
 

  • Puppy Support Forums are actually 3 forums
  • ~15 versions of Puppy and none of them are official. Including but not limited to FatDog, Lighthouse, Precise, Lucid, Slacko, MacPup and many more.
  • Puppy uses a Layered File System, no other Linux distro has this and thus learning this structure will not benefit anyone who decides to move to something else.
  • Puppy packages are VERY out of date...up to 5 years at times.
  • Puppy does not have a consistent package management solution...they have PET, PPM, etc but multiple solutions to one problem is not practical to being "user-friendly".
  • I can actually keep going but that should be enough.
I actually like Puppy for what it is made for...but new-to-Linux users is not what it is made for.


I agree. Puppy is not for everyone as a day to day OS, Yet is great for internet surfing on line shopping, When booted from a CD.


All of that can easily be done with something like Ubuntu MATE so you get the lightweight, CD bootable and all that without any of the issues of Puppy.

 


Linux itself is a Firewall, you don't actually need one but lets say you want one anyway. If that is the case then you should use http://gufw.org/ because this application is super simple to use and is included in the official repo of every distro.


There is still more to that than simply checking a box and pressing enter a couple of times when prompted to do so. Even searching for and installing software from PPM is not something that a new Puppy user is expected to be able to do, which is why there is QuickPet.... which is something else that makes Puppy more user friendly than other Linux distros.

 

File Managers have this built-in...whether you use Nemo in Linux Mint or Nautilus in Ubuntu or etc in whatever you get all the benefits of file managment with a GUI...No Terminal Needed. Ubuntu MATE actually comes with an application for File Searching as well as a File Manager.


In my experience these file search facilities in GUI file managers are not user friendly, and do not work as expected. For example if I open a terminal and type "locate conky.conf", locate finds the conky.conf file no problem. But if I open Dolphin and type "conky.conf" into the search box, it yields no results.

snapshotKubuntu16_zps3418950a.jpeg

Perhaps I'm doing something wrong, but typing the name of the file I want to find into the box that says "find" and pressing enter, is what I intuitively do. Yet I have never had any such problems with finding files using the GUI search applications in Puppy. Whereas with Kubuntu, I had to learn how to use the terminal before I was able to search for files. I also have Nautilus installed on Kubuntu on my other computer, and am pretty sure that it's search facility works, or doesn't work, much the same as the search facility in Dolphin.
 

You may have found Puppy to be easier because someone seems to have had you approach the other distros in a weird manner which if you had someone who approached you as a new-to-Linux user then you would have never experienced any of these issues.


Can you please explain what you mean by "a weird manner," and what makes you think that someone has had me approach the other distros in this way?
 

 

  • Puppy Support Forums are actually 3 forums
  • ~15 versions of Puppy and none of them are official. Including but not limited to FatDog, Lighthouse, Precise, Lucid, Slacko, MacPup and many more.
  • Puppy uses a Layered File System, no other Linux distro has this and thus learning this structure will not benefit anyone who decides to move to something else.
  • Puppy packages are VERY out of date...up to 5 years at times.
  • Puppy does not have a consistent package management solution...they have PET, PPM, etc but multiple solutions to one problem is not practical to being "user-friendly".
  • I can actually keep going but that should be enough.
I actually like Puppy for what it is made for...but new-to-Linux users is not what it is made for.

 


  • There is one main support forum for Puppy, and some other Linux distros also have more than one support forum
  • There are hundreds of versions of Linux
  • There is also much out of date software in the Ubuntu repositories, but older versions of software are not necessarily less user-friendly than newer versions.
  • I have not found it necessary to learn anything about Puppy's "layered file system" in order to be able to use Puppy. Can you provide an example of how this layered file system could be an obstacle for beginners when they use Puppy?
  • All of the Puppy distros I have used have had only one PPM application installed. There are also several PPM applications for Ubuntu based distros. For example Kubuntu 12.04 has Muon Package Manager, Kubuntu 14.04 has Muon Discover, then there's the Ubuntu Software Centre in Ubuntu, and Synaptic etc.
  • None of the points you have made are "real world" specific examples, of why Puppy is less user-friendly than other Linux distros. Can you provide any specific examples of issues that you have personally had with Puppy?


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:18 PM


 

Linux itself is a Firewall, you don't actually need one

That is so wrong.  Like I said elsewhere. 

Example the Bash bug. While the bug would not have affected the average user.

Running a firewall would have protected you from running internet facing services that could have been used to to exploit it.

 


 

15 versions of Puppy and none of them are official. Including but not limited to FatDog, Lighthouse, Precise, Lucid, Slacko, MacPup and many more.

And exactly how many Linux Distros are there? Just on distro watch there are over 100.

 


 

You may have found Puppy to be easier because someone seems to have had you approach the other distros in a weird manner which

If I remember right AL puppy was the only Distro that got your dial up and wifi working.  Retro pup? And it was that hard to figure out somebody who never used puppy figured it out.

 


 

None of the points you have made are "real world" specific examples, of why Puppy is less user-friendly than other Linux distros. Can you provide any specific examples of issues that you have personally had with Puppy?

I agree with this.

 

I pm'ed Admin about the Which Distro is right thread because it was getting out of hand, Animal closed the thread and I support his decision. Now lets see if you can do something better, If I do not see something in 14 days I will do the best I can in starting a new sticky thread using some of your suggestions.

 

You made some big statements and I agree with some of it, However it's time to pay the piper as they say. Let's see if you are as good as you say you are  or if it's all just hot air.

 

The ball is in your court.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 04:31 AM

 

 

Linux itself is a Firewall, you don't actually need one but lets say you want one anyway.

 

Bad advise to be handing out. The ufw Firewall must be enabled in the Terminal for maximum protection, as well as checking router Firewall and Remote Administration/UP&P settings. Plus renaming the router to anything other than the default, and changing default passwords. 

 

Just because we run Linux doesn't mean we need to neglect security, it's foolish & downright dangerous thinking. The OS itself in not a Firewall, if it were, there would be no debate. 

 

Though I've used FatDog64 with success to test 64 bit computers that wouldn't boot, and all did, my other attempts at using Puppy on a couple of lower spec machines are at best, troublesome. 

 

As I recall, there were too many steps to go through just to begin using the browser, and is why I stick with Linux Live DVD's such as the latest Linux Mint for banking, and the ufw Firewall can be enabled there, if desired & I recommend it. For me, there were way to many processes to go through to run Puppy compared to Linux Mint, and for the purpose of this, I'm using Live Mode of Mint 17 to keep the playing field level, plus have a clean OS, after each boot. 

 

Why doesn't Puppy have a straight shot to the browser once booted? Or do I need a more full fledged Puppy, where these things are already done? I don't want to create a savefile, though am asked every time. Because for the ultimate in security, we want a clean boot every time. Nothing old to reload, that could place our security in danger, depending on what was saved. 

 

If there's a more loaded Puppy that doesn't require a several steps just to access the Internet, please post it for all to see. I realise these ranges in size of a little over 200MiB and 3.8GiB. For a 3.8GiB ISO, I'd expect it to be ready to boot & browse as soon as it's burned. w/out any other configuration, other than Firewall. 

 

Because as it stands, Puppy is much less user friendly than Mint or Ubuntu from Live DVD. If Puppy were as easy as Mint or Ubuntu to run, at 200-300MiB, then I'd be downloading fresh Puppy distros as they're released. 

 

Didn't get the chance to run the latest version of FatDog64, hopefully will tomorrow, and I can report back on that. However, this is for 64 bit machines only, I'm not sure if there's a FatDog32 bit. The current version of FatDog64 is 700b2, and based on Slacko, rather than PET. And as I recall, Slackware is very user unfriendly. I'll see sometime in the late morning/early afternoon. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 Al1000

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 09:37 AM

Why doesn't Puppy have a straight shot to the browser once booted? Or do I need a more full fledged Puppy, where these things are already done?

Quite possibly, yes, depending on what you have used before. It's Lucid and earlier Pups that don't come with an internet browser already installed (unless you count Dillo), but Precise 5.7.1 and later Pups do. I have only used one pre-Lucid Puppy, which I think was 4.3.1, and it is the only one that didn't automatically detect my internet connection and I had to run the internet connection wizard. Every other Puppy I have used found the internet connection automatically first time, on both of my computers.

You are asked to select your language and keyboard settings etc when you boot up with a fresh installation of Puppy, just as you are with Mint and Ubuntu etc, but you don't have to do so, and can just close the window and go with the default settings; click on the internet browser icon on the desktop and you should be on the internet with SeaMonkey. As far as I recall, that's all there is to it. Although it might be an idea to check the "install firewall" box, then press enter a couple of times when prompted to do so to complete the installation; but that's easy for even a beginner to do, doesn't require using the terminal, and takes only a few seconds.

What I don't like about using a live CD/DVD for browsing the internet is that it doesn't have any security updates installed, like any Linux installation on your computer would. So rather than use a non-updated distro for internet banking etc, I downloaded the Puppy security updates for Heartbleed and Bash Bug, saved them to USB, then booted up with a fresh Puppy CD, entered all my settings and installed the updates from USB, then answered "yes" at shutdown to save the session to CD.

The only risk is that I caught a virus in between booting up and saving the session, even though I didn't use the internet; and there is surely more chance of a live session becoming infected when it is using the internet, than when it isn't. I could of course scan the CD for viruses, but I haven't bothered to do so as there is so little chance that it has one.

As has often been said, the only way to be 100% secure is to disconnect your computer from the internet entirely. And while I am certainly no expert on the topic, a live session that has security updates installed, surely has to be more secure than a live session that doesn't. And a CD that contains all your settings and the firewall already installed and enabled, is certainly more convenient than a CD/DVD that doesn't.

Puppy is the only CD/DVD I have ever booted up with just to browse the internet. What puts me off doing so with other distros for the most part, is the time it takes to load up the CD/DVD and open internet browsers, etc. Whereas since Puppy loads everything into RAM (and still uses only a fraction of the amount of RAM that larger distros use) when you boot up, it works faster than Mint or Ubuntu would if they were installed on a hard drive, never mind using them from a CD/DVD. And because Puppy is so small, the time it takes to boot from CD is comparable to the time that Mint or Ubuntu etc would take to boot from a hard drive, rather than with the time they take to boot from CD/DVD.

Although I appreciate that the time factor is not an issue for everyone. For instance I recall reading a post on this forum where the poster kept his/her live session running 24 hours a day (I don't recall the reason why), and other folk might treat booting up a computer like I treat doing a virus scan, i.e. go and do something else then come back when it's finished.

But for me the time factor is an issue, then there is the security update issue as well. It's been a while since I booted up with a fresh Puppy distro, but as far as I recall there are no steps you have to take between putting the CD/DVD into the drive, and browsing the internet, with Precise 5.7.1 and later Pups, that you don't have to take with Mint and Ubuntu etc.

In fact, although it's also been a while since I booted up with any other Linux CD/DVD, as far as I recall you have to select "try out" or something similar, in a menu where you choose between using the distro live or installing it, which is one step that you don't have to take with Puppy.

#5 wishmakingfairy

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 10:00 AM

If you're just getting on it to browse the web and maybe type some documents. Linux mint is straight forward and windows like that any new user should be able to pick it up in the first hour, enough to get the job done and move on with life. This is being said if you're looking for permanent, install to the hard drive and use like a normal computer type operating system.

 

Ubuntu is a little different looking and might take a bit to get use to, but you still click on the wireless icon in the task bar to connect to the internet and you still use the file browser to find your files. It has Firefox and libre office icons right in the launcher. So like before, just getting online and maybe typing documents while having an operating system you just have when you hit the power button.


Using ubuntu and sharing how to as well as collecting how to scripts for common programs. Feel free to ask or share ^-^


#6 NickAu

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 04:05 PM

 

The only risk is that I caught a virus in between booting up and saving the session,

You have more chance of being killed by a wild Lion on the streets of New York. That virus would have to be targeted at Puppy would need dependencies and all sorts.

 

 

Why doesn't Puppy have a straight shot to the browser once booted?

Just add a symlink to the start folder.

 

 

As I recall, there were too many steps to go through just to begin using the browser,

Please explain this bit.


Edited by NickAu1, 27 November 2014 - 12:13 AM.


#7 cat1092

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 12:34 AM

 

If you're just getting on it to browse the web and maybe type some documents. Linux mint is straight forward and windows like that any new user should be able to pick it up in the first hour, enough to get the job done and move on with life. This is being said if you're looking for permanent, install to the hard drive and use like a normal computer type operating system.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

In my early days of running LInux, it took me a few months to find the one that was right for me, and the day I installed Linux Mint, I knew this was the LInux for me. 

 

That was well over 5 years ago, and though have tried a few distros since, notably CentOS, haven't ever considered parting ways with Linux Mint. And why should I? Mint does all that you stated above & more, all with simplicity in mind, the way the founder, Clem Lefebvre intended for the OS to be. Everything is there that one needs to become a successful Linux user. Sure, things can be added if needed, but for a newbie, it doesn't get as easy as Linux Mint, once the install is complete. 

 

http://www.techradar.com/us/news/software/operating-systems/how-mighty-mint-became-one-of-the-most-popular-linux-distros-1146584

 

It will take a very strong opponent distro to knock Mint off the pedestal that it's on, and there are no signs of a contender as it stands today, the way Clem rose from dust to fame in the Linux world in such a short span will likely never be repeated during our lifetime. I believe the Zorin devs made a strong effort to, however that distro has hit it's peak & has quickly slid backwards in the last quarter. Success in the LInux world doesn't come easy. 

 

As far as being user friendly compared to Ubuntu based OS's, Puppy just doesn't stand a chance. That's not to state that Puppy is a bad OS, it's just that "user friendly" wasn't one of the traits that it was built on. It's targeted audience is an entirely different one. Puppy requires more time to learn the ropes, a continual effort that many new LInux users aren't willing to commit to, nor many veteran users of Linux Mint & other Ubuntu based OS's. Plus some has went to the Slacko project for packages recently, which may worsen things, and these current Puppy users may have some retraining on their hands. 

 

The numbers tells a lot of the story, and at DistroWatch, Mint has been in the #1 spot since late 2011 & all of the competition, including Puppy, has been in the rear view mirror for a long time & counting. Puppy is at #11 in the past 12 months, and should easily side past #10 Zorin, a once rising star that likely wrecked themselves with marketing efforts that they now may be second guessing (in the last three months have fallen to # 14), however the rest of the top 10 is stiff competition. 

 

http://distrowatch.com/index.php?dataspan=52

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 27 November 2014 - 12:36 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 Al1000

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 12:32 PM

My favourite distro, Kubuntu, is number 33.

Does that mean Puppy is more user friendly than Kubuntu? :)

FWIW, although I didn't use Mint for long - installed Mint 16 and planned to move onto Mint 17, briefly considered Zorin then discovered Kubuntu, Mint is what I would also recommend for a new Linux user who is used to Windows and wanted to install a Linux OS, if I was asked to name just one, because it's the most popular one that looks most like Windows.

But as far as booting up with a "live" distro goes, to browse the internet, Puppy has the competition beat hands down in terms of user friendliness for the following reasons:

  • Much faster boot up times
  • Runs much faster than Mint etc when used "live"
  • Security patches can be installed and saved
  • Settings can be saved
  • Beginners do not need to learn how to use the terminal in order to enable the firewall
  • Less steps from inserting the CD into the drive, to browsing the internet

My first ever experience with Linux was using an old version of Knoppix, booting from CD, which would have been to either delete a virus from Windows that couldn't be deleted when Windows was booted up because that would "activate" the virus, or to copy files from a failing hard drive. I used the CD a handful of times for both purposes over the years before I tried any other Linux distro, the first of which was Ubuntu earlier this year.

I didn't really know what I was doing the first time I booted up with Knoppix, regarding how to do anything with it, and just clicked on icons until I found the GUI file manager. I also recall trying out the internet browser on at least one occasion, out of curiosity, although I wouldn't have had the firewall enabled as I didn't know anything about it and didn't go near the terminal, and I don't recall it having a check-box like there is with Puppy.

Edited by Al1000, 27 November 2014 - 12:33 PM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 01:49 AM

 

 

Does that mean Puppy is more user friendly than Kubuntu?

 

No, just getting more hits or downloads, at 250MB, many will be curious. To be honest, I don't know how one can keep track of all of these Linux OS's, but DistroWatch is what one is normally pointed to. 

 

Kubuntu was very easy to install, but for one who has used the main version of Mint for well over 5 years, it was just too much for me to overcome, some things has to be relearned. It was the same with MInt's KDE, really I couldn't make heads or tails from either. Some of the apps that I run on MATE, won't run on KDE, even if they're shown in the Start Menu. Now, there may be a way to fix those things, and I probably could learn how to do this faster than relearning a new OS in Puppy, but I'm comfortable where I'm at. 

 

From most of the feedback that I read, on this forum, in previous others, and in Linux articles, Puppy is one of the harder distros to learn for daily use. It's probably partially popular due to this, why Puppy is a top contender, some users wants to learn and play with the OS, with graphics being a secondary or unimportant factor. Others wants to use it was a bootable secure OS for banking, though Mint 17.1 booted mighty fast for me awhile ago. 

 

Some of these OS's also has their ups & downs on this list, though the top 4-5 remains fairly steady, it would be hard for any distro to crack those. 

 

The top two are very user friendly, some of the others I can't say one way or the other, except for CentOS, it was getting interesting to me, and was working on learning in in late 2011/early 2012. Then came along Windows 8's Consumer Preview on the last day of February 2012, and that was the end of that. Things happened fast, started using the OS, was then invited to be a moderator of a forum for that OS, so all of my Linux use, except for transactions/emails came to a halt, as I was as busier than I had been in years. 

 

So had I not participated in any of that, I'd likely be using both CentOS & Mint, though CentOS was a steeper learning curve. 

 

One last thing to consider, though versions of Linux such as Mint, most anyone should be able to use with little effort, as far as the more advanced ones, it's all in the mindset. What may not be user friendly to one, may be to another, some wants a challenge, while others like myself, prefers to keep things simple. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 NickAu

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 04:08 AM

 

No, just getting more hits

Those numbers are not a true reflection of anything, It is not uncommon for friends of Devs to " bump up " the numbers on a distro by clicking it a " few " times.



#11 cat1092

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 04:58 AM

Yes they can bump up the numbers some. Also there are those whom downloads a distro, tries it out & tosses it in the garbage. 

 

For the same reasons, I don't see how accurate those Windows charts are. For some reason, no matter what, it never falls below 90%. Now, if there are ways to determine which versions of Windows on the net, there would be the same for Linux. 

 

While I believe the numbers may be fudged a bit, especially those past the top five, chances are the the ones at the top are close. I don't know what all factors are used, but would like to, there's a way to at least determine with reasonable accuracy the top 10-15. May not be perfect, but close. Update patterns, ISP statistics, all sorts of things to consider. 

 

Did you know that if you have a Microsoft account, you can go and look at your logins, and it'll show what version of Windows running if a MS OS, but also shows if it's Linux, Android or Mac & the IP address? Our ISP can determine which OS is used, and this is where they could be getting some of their information. 

 

Something else, I'd be willing to bet there are more Linux users than what's reported. We've probably broken the 2% mark and we don't get credited for it. Linux update usage would be help

 

So what if a user like myself is dual booting Windows & Linux. What OS do I get credit for? I should get one for each. Many other Linux users are in the same boat. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 Al1000

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 08:22 AM

From most of the feedback that I read, on this forum, in previous others, and in Linux articles, Puppy is one of the harder distros to learn for daily use.

Well my feedback has explained how it is easier with Puppy to:

1) Enable the firewall
2) Use as a "live" distro
3) Search for files

It's also easier with Puppy to create, delete, move, rename, copy and paste files and directories, because there are no file permissions, passwords or sudo command.

I have also mentioned that installing software in Puppy is not always as straightforward as with other distros. Most of the time it's just as easy, but sometimes issues do arise.

In what other ways have you heard that Puppy is harder to use than distros such as Mint and Ubuntu?

EDIT: Puppy is advertised as being meant to make computing not just fast, but also easy.

... Puppy Linux is a special build of Linux meant to make computing easy and fast.

http://puppylinux.org/main/Overview%20and%20Getting%20Started.htm


Edited by Al1000, 28 November 2014 - 08:47 AM.


#13 bmike1

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 03:20 PM

I went to the website mentioned in the previous post and it too says that you don't need to worry about viruses.

  • Do More - Puppy boots in less than a minute, even in old PCs, and it does not require antivirus software. Administering Puppy is quick and minimal. With Puppy, you just have to take care of your data, which you can easily save to USB flash (Then forget about your operating system!). Your data can be read by other computers.

Edited by bmike1, 28 November 2014 - 03:23 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#14 NickAu

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 12:26 AM

 

I went to the website mentioned in the previous post and it too says that you don't need to worry about viruses.

I say this with all due respect. Do you guys know how hard it would be to get a virus on Puppy?

If its live boot, No save file no HDD , With Persistence, Cant be done.( Spare me the theoretical firmware BadBios mumbo jumbo Im talking real world) I will happily run any file anybody sends me screen shoot it then reboot. The laptop I will use has no HDD and no USB  boots only from CD.

 

 

Even if its fully installed to HDD, Ask anyone who has tried to install software from some place else, Not PPM, Not Quick Pet, Not using a .Pet or SFS? That virus would have to be made to run on Puppy what ever with dependencies and ........


Edited by NickAu1, 29 November 2014 - 01:23 AM.


#15 cat1092

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 01:29 AM

One thing that I don't understand that that compared to other Puppies I've tried, FatDog64, which is seldom mentioned, doesn't require a walkthrough to use, boot & shoot. 

 

All of the 32 bit versions that I've tried, there were roadblocks to browser access. Just burned the latest, and with a single click, was (am) on Firefox Nightly. Just burned the ISO while viewing the Topic. I believe that if all of the Puppy variants were to adopt this dev's approach, Puppy would be seen as very user friendly. Firefox & SeaMonkey are both included, with a lot of other options. 

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/#download

 

I give FatDog64 a 10 out of 10 (user-friendliness) based on boot to eXtreme fast Internet access with one click after OS loads, which also is fast. Great for diagnosing 64 bit PC hardware, what I use these for, and for secure transactions. Although if for transactions, one needs to get to the point, if general browsing is performed before making a purchase, reboot to flush the last Live session. This is recommended for any bootable Linux distro when used in this manner. 

 

Note that while there are other options of booting FatDog64, I went with the first (& default) option. The quickest way to get from Point A to Point B is a straight path. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 29 November 2014 - 01:30 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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