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Linux Mint 17.1 review comes up shiny.


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#1 TsVk!

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 06:55 PM

 

Linux Mint 17.1 is the first example of what the Mint project team can do when they're focused on their own system rather than on making the latest Ubuntu work with Mint.

That’s because Mint 17.1 sticks with the Ubuntu released earlier this year – the first time this desktop Linux has not gone with the more recent Ubuntu.

 

It’s a welcome upgrade for Mint fans.

 

Mint's flagship Cinnamon desktop, fast becoming the best desktop in Linux, has been updated to Cinnamon 2.4. It lacks any revolutionary features, rather Cinnamon 2.4 polishes, refines and – perhaps most noticeably – speeds up the Cinnamon experience.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/11/24/mint_17_1_review/



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 07:24 PM

It is a good replacement for Windows XP.

 

I find myself drifting away from the main line Distro's as they are too Windows like, I mean other than starting UFW the average user can do it all point and click style, You are notified about updates,  software like browsers are also updated, I can install drivers thru a driver manager ( sacrilege ) There are software managers that you just use point and click to install stuff. Im starting to prefer the more simple Linux Distro's like Puppy Linux Tahr Pup, Even on my Desk Top and that's an i5 see sig.

 

Now I admit that as a day to day Operating System Puppy Linux Any Type is not for everybody, However As a Live Boot from CD it is still the safest way I know of for things like internet shopping and banking.


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#3 TsVk!

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 07:55 PM

As a Debian lover I'm also not into fully automated shiny Windowsesque desktops, but more configurable workspaces that do exactly what I tell them to do... But all of my family at home who would not budge from their beloved Windows are now using Mint.

 

It is a great transition for anyone coming from Windows, and an easy to use Linux distro for the less technically inclined.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 02:48 AM

TsVk!, I agree, Linux MInt is a very easy to use Linux distro, and this is why I push it to those looking to ditch Windows. As long as the computer is connected to the Internet and accessories such as printers are plugged in & turned on during the install, the drivers are loaded when rebooted. 

 

I also like the fact that updates are in real time, not one time per month, and as of late, there's been more updates. The cool thing is that post install, as with most other Ubuntu based Linux OS's, only one update round is needed, and I've seen times when Linux Mint fully updated faster than the handful after a .NET Framework 4.0 install. That would trigger about a dozen updates that would take a long time to finish. 

 

Other areas where Mint has improved is that unlike a couple of years back, the default Firefox browser is kept up to date, used to be it was two versions behind, and if one installs Google Chrome, the Update Manager takes care of that too. Plus if one uses Firefox Sync or is signed into Google Chrome on Windows, their bookmarks & most extensions will install to Linux Mint. 

 

I do agree with Nick that the safest way to perform online transactions is by a bootable Linux OS, if one keeps their install media, this serves the same purpose quite well, as long as it isn't too old. Some sites wants as recent as a browser as possible, that's why I keep a copy of Lightweight Portable Security on hand, it's only a 400MB download, though I realize that non-US countries may have trouble accessing the media. They notify me by email about every three months when a newer one is released. 

 

Puppy is good for some, but it's not for everyone. I keep a copy of FatDog64 to boot into 64 bit computers to determine if their hardware or OS is at fault, and that's the extent of it. It loads as fast as greased lightning at 250MB, which is why I prefer it to a 1+GB Linux install media for that purpose. 

 

However, unless something goes wrong, and I don't expect it to, LInux Mint MATE will be my desktop choice for years to come. After having running it since 2009 for much of my tasks, and haven't used Windows for a transaction for nearly three years, feeling guilty that I laid down $75 for two Windows 8 Pro upgrades in late 2012, I donated the same amount to the MInt project last year. It's a shame, that $75 was wasted, as I only boot into both one time a month to update the OS & other software, and until the next month, that's it. 

 

There are going to be two more Linux MInt updates on the same Ubuntu version, the MInt team aren't waiting around for every Ubuntu release before they improve their OS (the short releases). As I read it in another article, these are more like a service pack, rather than a full release, but will still offer more with each one. 

 

The next full release of Linux Mint won't be until another Ubuntu LTS is released, unless Clem changes his mind. 

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 TsVk!

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:00 AM

I'm looking forward to the stable Mint Debian, the rolling release is great... though I don't like the non Debian repositories.

 

Great things to come from that release.



#6 wizardfromoz

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:19 AM

 

It is a great transition for anyone coming from Windows, and an easy to use Linux distro for the less technically inclined.

 

... Must be why I find it to be easy to use, other than no Ctrl-Alt-t for Terminal.

 

Thanks for the new Topic, oh Northern One

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

Hey if the new Mint is going to be cool, does that make it a Kool Mint (Aussie Aussie Aussie Oi OI OI)??



#7 cat1092

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 04:29 AM

I've tried the Debian version of Mint a few times, my best luck with install was on a virtual machine. The installer, by default, wants the entire drive and there's no obvious way out. 

 

Of course, most of that is due to the fact that I've not ventured far away from the traditional Ubuntu type of install, which many Linux OS's, including all versions of Mint except Debian, are based on. 

 

Mint is a great OS that was originally founded as a "wish OS", Clem hosted a talk show, and the audience would discuss what they wanted in an OS. He listened to what they wanted, and though many never though it would do good, Mint went from the back of the pack in 2006, and edged out Ubuntu barely in late 2011. Today, the margin has widened, at one point by a 2 to 1 margin, back when the Ubuntu devs ticked off many users by their evident copycat (the UI) of Windows 8. If one looks at the two in Ubuntu's & Windows 8's native mode, yes they're different, but at the time somewhat alike. The world wasn't ready for all of this mouse swiping all over the place to find buried menus. Like with Windows 8, Ubuntu has a place to type in a few letters of what one wants & the app will show. 

 

That's just too much work, and why Mint kept the things the way they were, nothing was broken, so there was no point in fixing just to provide eye candy, at the expense dishing out frustration to their users. Eye candy can be added with wallpapers, of which Mint as a lot of & more can be downloaded, and for the ultimate, one can go for Mint KDE. I tried that one too, just wasn't for me, and was anything but simple. By simple, I mean booting right into it w/out any or little knowledge & getting things done. We've had notable members on this site, totally raw to the world of Linux, one whom it didn't look good awhile, but he refused to give up & now is doing good. 

 

While many in the XP forums, when we mention LInux Mint, most of all are full of excuses as to why they "need" XP. Home users at that. The truth is, many are afraid of change, but I have a feeling, just don't know when, the XP meltdown will be far more rapid than the Windows 2000 one, and it's going to be ugly. My only hope is that the holdouts don't mess it up for the masses. 

 

With easy to use OS's such as Linux Mint, no one has an excuse to be stuck in a dead end OS, except those who employment still requires it, those numbers are getting fewer. 

 

I see Linux MInt playing a huge part into putting Linux above 5% usershare in the not too distant years. We've almost doubled in the last couple of years alone, not a bad sign of things to come. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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