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Are there any SATA+PATA docking stations on the market?


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#1 Guitar-Picker

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 02:12 PM

I've got an ancient 2.5" 30GB PATA internal HD that still works great (saved from a 2000-era Dell laptop) and I've also got a newer, 160GB SATA HD that works great (saved from a more recent Dell laptop).   I'd like to be able to use them for extra storage, and if possible, I'd love to be able to boot from the newer 160GB SATA HD on occasion, since it still has a complete XP system, applications, etc.

 

Both drives have very different connector pins, as illustrated very well at: http://www.apricorn.com/what-hard-drive-do-i-need-sata-or-pata/

 

I have USB 2.0 enclosures for both drives, and they work fine when connected to my current Dell laptop via its USB 2.0 port.

 

but I recently started thinking:  my current Dell laptop also has ONE eSATA\USB port. If I could find a SATA docking station, I would be able to read/write to my

SATA HD a lot faster than USB 2.0 speeds!

 

Then I started wondering: Could the older PATA drive also read/write faster if I could connect THAT to my solitary eSATA\USB port?

 

Then, picturing my desktop all junked up with several external docking stations and a jumble of cables, and being blessed (cursed?) with a fertile imagination that does not always concur with reality,  I got to wondering: "I've seen lots of multiple-bay external SATA docking stations on the market by companies like Best Buy, Fry's Electronics, etc.   Is there a chance one of those multiple docking stations might be able to accept BOTH my SATA HD and my PATA HD, through my solitary eSATA/USB port?

 

But before running out to Fry's and throwing $$ at these questions in trial and error fashion, I thought it might help to post the question here, so whatever answers result, may help others.



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#2 Animal

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 02:48 PM

Something like this?: http://www.staples.com/STARTECHCOM-Hard-Drive-Docking-Station-UNIDOCK2U/product_IM1BY8840

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#3 Guitar-Picker

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:02 AM

Wow, great find!   However, I see that it connects to the PC via a USB 2.0 cable and the product specs state that "The docking station can transfer data to your computer at speeds of up to 480 Mbps through its USB 2.0 configuration."  It sounds as though even if I plug this docking station into my eSATA/USB port, it's probably still going to be limited to the same USB 2.0 480 Mbps transfer speed that my two drives already deliver, in the USB 2.0 enclosures they're already in.)    The original goal was to boost data transfer to faster, eSATA speeds by using my computer's eSATA\USB port.  So it's kind of murky whether this will actually be a solution. 



#4 bludshot

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:09 AM

Do you have an eSATA port? I wonder because you say "eSATA\USB port" and .. well, what is that?

 

They sell sata drive docks with usb3.0 and esata (I have one right here). They also sell drive docks that support pata (ide) and sata. You *may* be able to find one that has pata and esata. Consider also getting usb3.0 since it is faster than esata and your next computer will have 3.0 most likely.



#5 Guitar-Picker

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:21 AM

You can see what an eSATA/USB port looks like, here:
https://www.google.com/search?q=eSATA/USB+port&lr=&hl=en&as_qdr=all&biw=1634&bih=1183&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=pUtzVLaTGoT7yASM6IKwAg&ved=0CDEQsAQ

It lets you plug an external USB 2.0 device, OR an eSATA device, into your laptop.

But my Dell manual doesn't give any explanation beyond that. Further reading suggests if you plug an external eSATA drive into this port, you may also need a separate power cord coming from (somewhere) and going to (somewhere) in order to power the eSATA drive, suggesting that the eSATA port only moves data, but does not also provide power. It's really all very fuzzy and confusing!

#6 bludshot

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:52 AM

Haha, cool. You learn something new every day...

 

I can clear that part up for you though, eSata doesn't provide power but USB does. For light power devices like mice or smaller usb drives, the usb line carries enough power. But for larger drives or devices, such as a USB hard drive dock, you also need a power adapter that plugs into the dock. This comes with the drive dock (or other usb device such as a powered usb hub).

 

And if you get a drive dock or external drive enclosure that has esata, it will also come with a power adapter. So, the power comes from the wall, and goes to the dock or other device.






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