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Security Systems


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#1 05harley

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 02:32 PM

I currently have Trend Micro Titanium Max Security installed on my computer, do I need any additional security systems?  At some point I must have downloaded Malwarebytes anti malware, I continue to receive a pop up advising me to update my computer with a new version,  I am hesitant to do this.

Second question, my computer has gotten progressively slower over time, any suggestions to remedy this?  I need step by step directions.

Thanks for all of your help in the past, it is greatly appreciated and has kept me sane!!!

05Harley



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 07:45 PM

Sorry - your topic seems to have got missed in the shuffle.

 

A quick look around reviews for Titanium Security show that it is well thought and considered effective, so long as it is kept up to date, but that goes for any security software.

 

Malwarebytes is also considered highly effective, and again you need have no qualms about updating it. Every time you run it you are prompted to update the DAT file and they do bring out an improved 'engine' from time to time. You need to be aware that Malwarebytes exists in two forms - paid and free. both versions are equally good at rooting out malware when scanning. The difference is that the free version is an 'on demand' scanner - it only runs when you run the program - while the paid version acts in real time to provide continuous malware scanning.

 

There are a number of reasons that computers slow down - or at least appear to - with the passage of time. First of all, you accumulate more applications all of which try to load at start up, secondly, unless you clean them out from time to time temporary files build up and clog up your computer. I use Piriform's Ccleaner for this and you can get it as a free download from BC, here -

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/ccleaner/

 

You are NOT recommended to use the registry cleaning tools in Ccleaner, see this image -

 

https://imageshack.com/i/nhys6sej

 

You can control what starts at start up by clicking 'Start' and then RIGHT clicking on 'Computer'. From the pop-up menu select 'Manage'. In the screen that then appears, in the L/H panel at the bottom you will see 'Services and Applications', expand this so you can see 'Services' and select it. In the screen that appears you can set the start up type. Use common sense and discretion here. Obviously, Windows applications have to start automatically, equally, the Adobe Reader can be set manual so that it starts when you need it.

 

If you have the free version of Malwareytes update it when asked to and run it from time to time, weekly is a good idea as a reasonable mininum. That and Trend Micro should keep your system secure, Ccleaner will get rid of temporary files and you can control what starts when you start up the computer.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 JayJax

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 02:48 PM

I was just browsing the topics and noticed your advisory against using CCleaner but I couldn't tell what the problem is supposed to be - I did use the link provided.

 

Anyway I'm curious because I've been using CCleaner for about 4 or 5 months and have had no issues with it - it seems to be quite helpful but maybe I'm missing something?



#4 frankp316

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 06:41 PM

He didn't tell you not to use CCleaner. He told you not to use the registry cleaner in CCleaner. BC does not recommend using registry cleaners.



#5 JayJax

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 08:53 PM

Thanks for clearing that up.



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 04:42 PM

It has been a long standing policy on BC not to recommend the use of registry cleaners because it is all too easy to convert your computer into a brick by ill-informed use, and many so-called 'PC Optimisation' tools are just registry cleaners in disguise.

 

 

'quietman7', on May 11 2009, 06:33 AM, said:snapback.png

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

  • Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

    The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.
  • Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.
  • Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.
  • Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.
  • The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

 

This quote from Quietman7 sums up our position on the matter. The registry is central to the operation of all Windows systems since Win 95 and, unless you have expert knowledge, is an area best left alone. I do not pretend to have expert knowledge !

 

The best way to keep your computer running safely is to have one reliable anti-virus product installed - which is kept up to date, to run anti-malware scans from time to time, to practice safe surfing - ie don't click on everything in sight, and to clean out your temporary files from time to time.

 

Ccleaner is an excellent tool for clearing out temporary files. Ccleaner also contains a registry cleaner. As I pointed out in my earlier post, please do NOT use this registry cleaner aspect.

 

Chris Cosgrove


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 16 November 2014 - 04:44 PM.
Clarification


#7 RobertHD

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 07:58 PM

1 thing to look out for is RegClean Pro its a PUP thats very annoying


Robert James Crawley Klopp


#8 JayJax

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 08:01 PM

THANKS for the additional info and warnings - we need to know



#9 RobertHD

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 08:04 PM

your welcome i have been attacked in the past by it but avast and malwarebytes take care of it.


Robert James Crawley Klopp





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