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Cascading router assistance please...


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#1 Cjay58

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 11:30 PM

Hello,

 

First off I am fairly much a newbe  to the computer world, but Im trying to learn...

 

I have a couple routers that I wanted to "cascade" so that I can have two separate subnets in house.

At the end I had a working primary router, but the secondary router had wireless but no connection to the internet.

 

The routers are both Actiontec V1000h

 

First router(PRIMARY):

plugged into DSL

Set up so my router IP was 192.168.1.1

I set up a range of DHCP from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.50

 

Second router;

Set up so router IP was 192.168.2.1

I set up a range of  DHCP from 192.168.2.2 to 192.168.2.50

 

Both SSID`s were set differently as well as passwords for access.

 

I ran aN ethernet cable from the primary router LAN port to the secondary router WAN port.

 

Both routers could access the internet and connect fine on their own, but once they were both turned on together and a cable in between things got weird.

The primary router had a full wireless connection working fine but as mentioned above the secondary subnet had a visible wireless but when connected could not access internet.

 

Thanks for any help.

 

 

 

 



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#2 Cjay58

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 11:45 PM

The routers come from an ISP so they have been restricted access to some things such as bridge mode. 

Im not positive on this but bridge mode would not be necessary for this would it?



#3 sflatechguy

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:00 AM

Just off the top of my head, check to make sure the IP address of the default gateway and DNS server for the second router points to the first router, 192.168.1.1, in order to be able to connect to the Internet. You may have issues with port forwarding on the 192.168.1.0 subnet, however, as you have essentially double-NAT'ed the second router.



#4 Cjay58

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:17 AM

Thanks for your comment sflatechguy. 

 

If I am wanting two separate subnets I don't believe I would want to disable DHCP on the second router would I ? So what I did is set up a block of allowable DHCP addresses to be given out on both networks pertaining to their individual subnets. I figured this would stop the possibility of double nat, wouldn't it?

 

The pointing to an internet connection is where I believe I have gone wrong though so maybe I should try pointing the secondary router to the primary DNS and default gateway.


Edited by Cjay58, 11 November 2014 - 12:19 AM.


#5 cat1092

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:44 AM

Cjay, these are tricky issues, the daisy chaining of routers (as I understand your posting), something that I considered, but never tried. 

 

Some recent OS's has the ability to become an access point, though am not sure about the recent one's you mentioned. 

 

At any rate, good lick! :thumbup2:

 

Ca


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 sflatechguy

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:52 AM

If you want two separate subnets and you don't want to use static IP addresses on those subnets, you will have to have DHCP enabled on both routers, one for each subnet. However, the second router needs a way to forward DNS queries to the Internet. Because the first router is the one with the Internet connection, you need to configure the second router to use the first router as it's default gateway and DNS server, and make sure DHCP on the second router configures all devices on the 192.168.2.0 subnet to use the second router as their default gateway and DNS server.

 

As I said earlier, this may create problems for the 192.168.2.0 subnet, as it will be double-NAT'ed. Some Internet services may not work properly on that subnet.



#7 Cjay58

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 01:05 AM

Thanks for the further explanation sflatechguy. I may have to find a better way to do this Im thinking. Do you have any recommendation on another angle I may attempt to do this a better?

 

Hi cat1092. Yes it does seem to be a bit tricky. I figured that this was the easiest way to go about doing this but I am now starting to rethink that theory.



#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 02:25 AM

You could set them up in bridged mode, so the first router's NAT functions are essentially disabled and the second router has direct access to the public IP address on the first router. I guess the question now is, what do you need two subnets for? What do you need two routers for? If you are trying to separate data traffic and computers by segmenting the network, then you will want to create subnets on each router. If it's not absolutely necessary to set them up that way, you can configure the second router to simply function as a switch, and just use one subnet.



#9 Kilroy

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 06:20 AM

Here is the page on GRC for configuring two NAT routers.



#10 CaveDweller2

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 09:05 AM

Ah Sflatechguy asks a good question - what are you trying to accomplish?


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#11 Cjay58

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:20 PM

Thanks for all the help.

My plans are to make two separate networks so that I can run one as normal but the second set up through open DNS for better filtering. Im also just doing this as a learning tool as well.



#12 sflatechguy

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 01:15 PM

The link Kilroy supplied has some good info. I recommend you read it.

In short, if you want two subnets, you'll want the first router to get its default gateway and DNS server info automatically, via the ISP. You can set up the first router to use DHCP; just make sure the second router's IP address for it's WAN port is a static one in the 192.168.1.0 subnet, and that it is outside the range of IP addresses the first router will supply via DHCP. Perhaps something like 192.168.1.52. Set up the second router to supply DHCP addresses in the 192.168.2.0 subnet. Set the second router's default gateway to the IP address of the first router, 192,168.1.1. You can also set it's DNS server address to that IP address, or use the ISP's DNS servers, or even use Google's public DNS -- 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. Make sure the clients on both subnets are set to get their IP address, default gateway and DNS server info automatically.

Again, you may face some port forwarding issues on the second router, so you may have to configure some of those ports manually.



#13 Wand3r3r

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 11:25 AM

"My plans are to make two separate networks so that I can run one as normal"

 

Do understand the network closest to the internet is not secure from the one farthest from the internet since the farthest is going through the first.

 

Easiest way to get around any port forwarding issues with the farthest network is to put its wan port connection to the first router in the dmz.



#14 Cjay58

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 08:25 PM

Ok I have some further questions;

 

I have temporarily disconnected my secondary router to decide upon a better way about doing this.

I am however a bit confused about how to direct the secondary router to the first one.

 

I have an area within my router settings called WAN Connection status. Her it gives me Wan type, tells me its dynamic, modem IP address, Subnet mask, lease time and 2 DNS addreses.

In another section called LAN settings I have info regarding,Modem Ip address, sennet mask, values of Ip addresses (example from 192.168.1.64 to 192.168.1.254) and a DNS address(same as my address for modem IP as in Lan setting)

 

If I understand correctly my LAN info is my in house(for lack of better terms) network but my WAN info is the info for the outside network. So with that would I want to direct my secondary router to the WAN or LAN DNS and IP address  for the primary router with internet access?

Thanks in advance



#15 CaveDweller2

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 09:07 PM

Connect a LAN port of the first to the WAN port of the second. 

 

Example:

Router1 LAN - 192.168.1.1 which you don't have to mess with

Router2 WAN - 192.168.1.2, subnet mask 255.255.255.0, default gateway 192.168.1.1. the DNS servers - should be OpenDNS servers since that's what you wanted.

Router2 LAN - 192.168.2.1 and set the DHCP how you want.

 

I think that will work *scratches head*


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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