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Issues with Ubuntu 14.10, or is my pc toast?


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#1 davey crockett

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 01:47 PM

Hi Folks

 

 I have a generally inquiry about Linux.. I started with whatever Ubuntu was available 8 months ago (after the great philanthroper gates pulled the plug on xp) and am now updated to Ubuntu 14.10.  This acer laptop is 6 or 7 yrs old, has a 40gb hd, and no hardware upgrades so it is basic - not sure what ram is in it. The thing ran great for a while with a new os, but now is freezing up quite often with lots of undefined error reports. I sometimes have to hard wire it to my modem, then disconnect the line to kick start the wireless, and it is bogging down when starting and shutting down. Any ideas much appreciated - does Linux have a system restore or scan of some sort available?



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 02:20 AM

davey, have you tried a reinstall? If you've performed upgrade installs (not recommended), your OS will be a mess. 

 

That's the beauty of why it's best to have a separate /home partition, you can install & format the main OS partition & include, and not format the /home partition. This is typically called a "fresh upgrade", and though I use Linux Mint 17 instead of Ubuntu, one of my installs still has the /home partition of Mint 13. It's been recycled 3 times since it's original install. Many Linux users does this. 

 

As to updating or upgrading, Ubuntu pushes this heavily, but it's not recommended by Linux IT Pros & other researchers, plus the clean install or upgrade only takes minutes, rather than hours. Ubuntu has this Upgrade button ready to click when the newer release is issued. With a clean install of Ubuntu, you shouldn't be having these issues.......unless you're having hardware troubles. 

 

So please tell us, how are you moving or "updating" from one version to the next, so that we'll all be on the same page? If you're not booting from a DVD or Flash drive to do it, it's the wrong way. We can assist with this, showing you how to install, then perform a clean upgrade with each release. Too, it's best to stick with LTS releases. These are more stable, and are good for at least 2, if not 3 years. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 November 2014 - 03:27 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 NickAu

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 02:31 AM

Also posted here http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/553847/help-with-drivers/page-4

 

Everything from post 50 on should be moved here.


Edited by NickAu1, 08 November 2014 - 02:32 AM.

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#4 wizardfromoz

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 02:45 AM

Points above noted, and already explained, guys.

 

davey crockett has swung over to newbies-gurus, &c, where we are continuing. Input welcome, as always.

 

tks for the above input

 

:wizardball: Wiz

 

BTW, this had the "blessing" of Cjay58, where "davey" first appeared

 

Edited - bottom BTW inserted


Edited by wizardfromoz, 08 November 2014 - 02:46 AM.


#5 NickAu

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 04:18 PM

 

davey crockett has swung over to newbies-gurus, &c, where we are continuing

The question was asked here and should be answered here to avoid confusion, what's the point of going over to  newbies and gurus thread where it will be buried in pages of chat,


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#6 davey crockett

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 06:11 PM

davey, have you tried a reinstall? If you've performed upgrade installs (not recommended), your OS will be a mess. 

 

That's the beauty of why it's best to have a separate /home partition, you can install & format the main OS partition & include, and not format the /home partition. This is typically called a "fresh upgrade", and though I use Linux Mint 17 instead of Ubuntu, one of my installs still has the /home partition of Mint 13. It's been recycled 3 times since it's original install. Many Linux users does this. 

 

As to updating or upgrading, Ubuntu pushes this heavily, but it's not recommended by Linux IT Pros & other researchers, plus the clean install or upgrade only takes minutes, rather than hours. Ubuntu has this Upgrade button ready to click when the newer release is issued. With a clean install of Ubuntu, you shouldn't be having these issues.......unless you're having hardware troubles. 

 

So please tell us, how are you moving or "updating" from one version to the next, so that we'll all be on the same page? If you're not booting from a DVD or Flash drive to do it, it's the wrong way. We can assist with this, showing you how to install, then perform a clean upgrade with each release. Too, it's best to stick with LTS releases. These are more stable, and are good for at least 2, if not 3 years. 

 

Cat

Thanks Cat - I have not been booting from removable device for upgrades. I don't think I have hardware issues, unfortunately I am not exactly techy and would have done a reinstall by now if I had the clues to do it. BTW, my system is a 7 year old acer, 1.86 ghz processor, 32 bit, 1 Gb ram. 



#7 cat1092

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 04:07 AM

 

 

davey crockett has swung over to newbies-gurus, &c, where we are continuing

The question was asked here and should be answered here to avoid confusion, what's the point of going over to  newbies and gurus thread where it will be buried in pages of chat,

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

I responded earlier to a question regarding this Topic, only later to realize that a question pertaining to it had been moved elsewhere. Going from Topic to Topic to solve issues is the hard way of doing things, and requires to keep several tabs open to follow any instructions. 

 

Having everything in the Topic is also good for future reference, so am going to copy/paste some of the content of the other to have it here, much of the rest of this post is just that. 

 

Yes, clean install is always the best way to go, when possible, and in the case of Ubuntu, there's no reason not to do this. Even in the case of Windows, the only OS that's mandatory upgrade (if one wants it), is 8.1 from Windows 8, no clean install allowed w/out a new key, upgrade only. So if you can help it, stick with Windows 7 for as long as possible, if you're going to dual boot Windows & Linux. 

 

Plus EasyBCD 2.2 can help if you're a LInux dual booter, especially Windows 8 or above. It will allow one to keep their Linux install intact, even through Windows Upgrades. This is to be installed on Windows, if needed.

 

With Windows 7 (or below), it's OK to dual boot both OS's the native LInux way. 

 

By clean install of Ubuntu, I'm referring to this site, where to get your ISO file to create install media. Be sure to get the correct bit version for your system. 

 

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

 

And ignore this advice in the link below, as I stated earlier, it's nothing but trouble. This type of install causes lots of problems, and though on the main page there's a provided link to this, Nick, Wiz, Al, Kaosu & others will second me that this is the wrong way to get a new version of Ubuntu. Even if you get a notification where you do for System Updates that a new one is available, don't do it. 

 

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

 

This is why LInux MInt doesn't offer this option natively, yes one can do it, but it's not the recommended path. Upgrade installs are the worst way to move to a new OS, and things are little better, if any, since the turn of the century, and this has a lot to do with why your system is in a mess. 

 

Of course, this is something that can fixed, by a clean install, with media from the link provided. 

 

Don't let this get you discouraged, many others has fell into the same trap, it's good that you posted early, so that the situation can be properly addressed. And note that you don't have to get a new Ubuntu every time one's available, stick with LTS releases, these are supported for 5 years, and on the download page of a new version, it'll say if it's LTS or not. Make notes of these things. A new LTS is offered every 2 to 3 years, not every 6 to 9 months. You need to download the latest LTS of Ubuntu while the link is there, otherwise, you'll get a short term release if you don't know how to look for previous versions. 

 

Hang in there, and if in doubt, always ask us first.   :)

 

Better that than the troubles associated with less than optimal installs, and you'll also enjoy your Ubuntu OS much more. 

 

So the first step is in getting the OS, in the link above with the Ubuntu OS Download, you can do this from Windows if Ubuntu isn't working. Being that you have only 1GiB of RAM, you'll be better off with xubuntu, of LInux MInt 17 Xfce, both are Xfce environments (lightweight desktop). The Full version of Ubuntu is just too much. Here are the links, you decide. Nick may present more. 

 

http://xubuntu.org/getxubuntu/

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=169

 

This is just my personal opinion & that only, you decide what you want to run. Linux Mint is as close as a drop in replacement for Windows as they come & the OS gets better with each release, though I normally stick with LTS releases, may grab a short one right before the next long one comes out. 

 

You can use ImgBurn to burn these to DVD's, or whatever DVD writing software you may have. Some XP system won't write to DVD, if so, you'll need a Flash drive or SD card of 2GiB or larger. Let us know if you can't burn to DVD. 

 

As a final reminder, please post all issues related to this issue in this Topic, and if Wiz or another member asks a question as to what you posted in the other Topic you posted this issue in, have those members ask questions here. Copy & paste the link to the Topic if needed. 

 

Good Luck to the world of Linux! :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 cat1092

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 04:38 AM

It is also best to stick with OS's based on Ubuntu & not those such as Puppy (though if you're very smart you may wish to try). MX-14 (an anti-X spinoff), as well as pure Debian installs. 

 

These are very confusing to the user & it's best to stay away. 

 

Being that you started with Ubuntu, the foundation of many great OS's, that's the one you should stick with. There's an added benefit of being user friendly. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 davey crockett

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 04:15 PM

This query would be to Cat or anyone for that matter familiar with Linux Lite. I installed Lite on my old laptop which had been running Ubuntu - 14.04 or something like that. The lite was the only version I could work with (my old disk with Ubuntu would not install). Lite seems very good overall but I think at this point I may have hardware issues. When I go to the command box to maybe try to enable f/w - type and press enter - it then asks for a password but will not allow me to type any further characters. I also have issues with updating the firefox browser. I have reinstalled the os and reset firefox several times now. Any ideas appreciated  :fumanchu: .. 



#10 NickAu

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 05:06 PM

I also have issues with updating the firefox browser.

How did you try to do this?
 
Try

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

When I go to the command box to maybe try to enable f/w

The correct command is

sudo ufw enable

it then asks for a password but will not allow me to type any further characters

Even though no characters appear when you type your password, you are actually typing your password
 
For security reasons there is no feedback of passwords given in the terminal.

 

Warning: Use at own risk, This should be used by advanced users only. If you mess this up you will lock yourself out of the system.

 

There is an option to enable password feedback for sudo and only for sudo by editing options in the sudoers file. However I will not show you how to do this.


Edited by NickAu1, 13 November 2014 - 10:31 PM.

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#11 davey crockett

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 08:33 PM

Thx - that works, as far as the firefox update, I came up with a file called xarchive tree or something like that, I was not sure what to do with it after the download was finished for the firefox update. No doubt something I did not do correctly.



#12 NickAu

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 10:33 PM

 

I came up with a file called xarchive tree or something like that,

Where did you come up with it?  Did you download it?  Way more info please.

 

 

XArchive is a file archiving programs with support for many different formats. For instance it includes support for rar, tar, zip, 7zip, arj, rpm, deb, and ace.

 

 

When you ask for support you should also include as much information about the problem as possible. Including all of the important details in your first post will greatly speed up the entire support process and allow our volunteers to better assist you. While you may think a particular error message isn't very helpful, it may be the key to resolving your issue. Some details we are looking for would include, but not be limited to:

  •     Your distribution's name (Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, etc), version (17, 14.04, 7, etc), and architecture (32-bit, 64-bit).
  •     Provide relevant information about your physical hardware or installed software.
  •     Share relevant log files, screenshots, detailed error messages, or anything else that could be used to troubleshoot your issue.

Edited by NickAu1, 13 November 2014 - 11:11 PM.

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#13 cat1092

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 10:36 PM

Normally, with Linux installs (though there may be exceptions), the browser is upgraded with the rest of the System Updates. What Nick showed you above. 

 

 

 

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

 

There should be somewhere on the screen a notification for updates, refer to the documentation of your distro. I'm not familiar with Linux Lite, though am with Ubuntu, Xubuntu & Linux Mint. The update process is similar on most all of the OS's ending with "buntu", as well as Linux Mint. Other distros that uses Ubuntu as a base likely have a similar updating system. 

 

Also, you can check in your Start Menu, under Administration, then System Updates. This not only keeps the software updated (including Firefox & Google Chrome, if installed), but also plug-ins such as Flash & all of your needed security updates. Keeping the Linux OS updated is not that hard, it's just knowing where the notification area is, or how to access the Update Manager. Though it may not be needed, nor prompted to, it's a good thing to reboot after updating, because some updates has effects on the system & may not kick in until the reboot. Such as updated graphic drivers, or a kernel. 

 

Oh, and don't forget that Firewall. 

 

The Terminal is the Linux users assistant, it gets a lot done, and the more one uses it, the more comfortable that user will be. It's not there to be intimidating, it's there to give the Linux user the power to get things done. So is "cmd" on Windows, however most of the time when one uses it, is after there's troubles. Today, many Windows users has no idea of what to do with the command line unless instructed, it's usually used to solve issues after the fact & mainly by system administrators for routine maintenance. 

 

On Linux, The Terminal is "cmd" on steroids. While it can be used for problem solving, it can also be used for most all routine maintenance, such as system updates. 

 

And every Linux user should become familiar with the Terminal, right after the install & the OS is rebooted into. Beginning with enabling the Firewall (some distros may use other commands), but the more popular ones uses "sudo ufw enable". Then perform System Update as Nick showed above. Using the Terminal is the only way to become familiar with it's functions. 

 

The Terminal also gives the Linux user superior power, like no other, over their system. This takes time to develop, but as noted above, usage should begin after the install is complete. 

 

Hope this helps to explain & provides encouragement. That's what we strive to do, is give our fellow members the tools needed to have a good working Linux system. 

 

The one thing that the Terminal cannot do however, is perform hardware repairs. However, it could be a driver, rather than the hardware, especially with graphics & sound. This is an area where there's no "one size fits all", what may work for one, may not for another. We make recommendations based on reported symptoms. for example, one may have perfect graphics but no audio. 

 

Hang in there, better days are awaiting you! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 11:06 PM

Lightning strike Tuesday night took out part of our local telephone exchange, and so the district has had no internet for nearly three days until a few minutes ago, I have been going bananas.

 

davey crockett, good to see you are progressing.

 

Sounds a bit like Lite's XArchiver is trying to build up a dependency tree of sorts, how it relates to the Firefox upgrade I am not sure.

 

Alternatives to XArchiver, or Archive Manager used by many, include File Roller, but I have not tried it myself yet, others may have comments PRO and CON.

 

There is mention of something like your question at this site, which appears to deal with Lite - https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/index.php?topic=151.0

 

BUT - please be aware that if you travel off-site from here at BC in search of solutions, it will help us if you let us know exactly what is asked and answered - cut and paste same to here, it helps us and it is polite, common courtesy.

 

Despite the fact that an earlier flavour of Linux was called Mandrake, before it merged with Connectiva to become Mandriva - we are not Mandrake the Magician and we don't read minds, lol.

 

Re posting screenshots images to this forum, if you are unaware how to do so, read excellent post by Moderator Stolen here:

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/536686/how-do-i-post-a-screen-shot/?hl=%2Bimages+%2Bstolen#entry3386653

 

...and please follow the above advice for updating/upgrading using sudo, it is very efficient.

 

Keep on truckin' :wink:

 

:wizardball:  Wiz



#15 NickAu

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 11:06 PM


 

And every Linux user should become familiar with the Terminal

While I agree in  with this, I also tend to disagree, Short of the UFW command ( I will get to that) the average user can run modern  Linux Ubuntu based distro without ever using terminal, I set up Kubuntu on a lady friends PC, The only time I used terminal was to enable ufw, She treats it like a Windows system, When it asks her to do an update she point and clicks, If she needs software she just points and clicks in Muon.

 


 

Oh, and don't forget that Firewall.

 

There should be a nagging box pop up that says ' do you want to enable firewall?'

Or

Do what Microsoft did, Enable it by default. Yes I can hear the Linux geeks screaming Heretic Hang him, But guys how hard is it to disable? This would be of benifit to novices.

 

How many of you guys knew that you had to enable the firewall? And How many actually knew how to do this?  I even had a guy ask me what was the point of running a firewall.

 

 

 

 

BUT - please be aware that if you travel off-site from here at BC in search of solutions, it will help us if you let us know exactly what is asked and answered - cut and paste same to here, it helps us and it is polite, common courtesy.

 

+1


Edited by NickAu1, 13 November 2014 - 11:09 PM.

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