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Migrated from SBS 2003 to 2011: Client PCs still "look" for source server.


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#1 a0adio0

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:42 AM

Hey everyone first time posting, but I've got a good one.

 

Long story short -- we migrated from 2003 to 2011 (I didn't perform the migration) and the person who did it didn't move the user profiles correctly. The result was that user's PCs would slow down intermitently as exlorer tried to access a newtork share that did not exist. This continues to cause us problems and I'm not certain how to purge SBS 2011 of the source server so that client PCs will run smoothly again.

 

So basically the new server is named "NEWSERVER" yet user profiles continue to look for a path to "\\OLDSERVER." This causes all kinds of performance issues.

 

We've got around 20 computers and one server running SBS 2011, Exchange 2010 and that's outfitted with 32 GB of RAM and plenty of HD space.

 

One particular symptom I've noticed is that shared network drives are tremendously slow, and that it does not effect users who have had accounts created after the migration.

 

Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.



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#2 x64

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 01:37 PM

You may be better off recreating the affected user profiles from scratch.

 

You could attempt to track down individual causes of the legacy paths (User drive mappings, looking in event viewer for legacy group policy issues, looking in the registry for what settings are locked in the policy tree and seeing if they tie in with what you would expect from your new set-up) but experience suggests you'd be picking bits out of your teeth for months to come...

 

Additionally, Outlook email profiles frequently have issues and prove very difficult to re-mediate in such situations -recreating those as well (which would happen anyway if you recreated the Windows profiles), is likely the most expedient route, if you experience issues with them.

 

x64



#3 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 06:12 PM

Firstly i would see what drievs are in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Network, then i would run rsop.msc and see what group policies are aplying and what version domain functional level are you running?



#4 a0adio0

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 09:37 AM

Firstly i would see what drievs are in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Network, then i would run rsop.msc and see what group policies are aplying and what version domain functional level are you running?

 

The only drives I see are the shared network drives (three of them, all pointing to the correct location).

 

When I run rsop.msc, it throws the following error:

 

Untitled.png



#5 a0adio0

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 09:39 AM

You may be better off recreating the affected user profiles from scratch.

 

You could attempt to track down individual causes of the legacy paths (User drive mappings, looking in event viewer for legacy group policy issues, looking in the registry for what settings are locked in the policy tree and seeing if they tie in with what you would expect from your new set-up) but experience suggests you'd be picking bits out of your teeth for months to come...

 

Additionally, Outlook email profiles frequently have issues and prove very difficult to re-mediate in such situations -recreating those as well (which would happen anyway if you recreated the Windows profiles), is likely the most expedient route, if you experience issues with them.

 

x64

 

Any available guidelines as far as recreating a user profile with the same name and email? Thanks much.



#6 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 06:59 PM

You might have to rejoin the computers to the domain, it cant even find the namespace of the domain. Make sure you remove one machine then rejoin it and make sure you set the dns sufix to the fqdn when joining. See how that goes mate.

#7 starrouter

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 09:41 PM

With only 20 computers it wouldn't take long to visit each machine and run a batch file that has something like below for each drive:

 

net use K: /delete

net use K: \\NEWSERVER\SHARENAME /P:Y

 

net use M: /delete

net use M: \\NEWSERVER\SHARENAME /P:Y

 

and so forth for each affected drive letter that is mapped to the old server...

You would need to run it from the affected users login and should not need admin privileges for this file to run.


Edited by starrouter, 07 November 2014 - 09:43 PM.





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