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Question on continued use of XP


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#1 LarsMac

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 08:18 PM

I have an old Sony Vaio P4 Media Center PC that has a bunch of older games on it, like Age of Empires, and such that the grandkids like to play. It is running XP Media Center SP3.

 

I am just wondering what is the best/recommended AV to protect the thing now that MS no longer support MSE on XP.

 

A more complex question is:

Is there a simple way to convert to a dual boot system with Ubuntu and XP without screwing up the XP image?

 

 

 

 

  

 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 11:42 AM

There simply is no such thing as a "best AV"...and an AV is only one of the lines of defense employed on a computer system which is well-protected.

 

The first line...security updates/critical updates.

 

Second line...firewall.

 

Third line...AV.

 

Fourth line...antimalware program such as SUPERAntiSpyware.

 

Most important factor and the key to system vulnerabilites and malware...the user.  This is also the weak link, since none of the aforementioned will have any impact if user does not employ safe computing practices and utilize the other tools listed above.

 

Google Results, Dual-Boot XP/Linux

 

Louis



#3 LarsMac

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 01:11 PM

Thanks for the reply. 

I agree completely. 

Given that the first line of defense on your list has now collapsed, It falls to my Firewall to be the first line of defense. 

I have a lot of faith in my. Actually two. 

My initial DSL modem has a fairly effective firewall, I have the PC sitting behind a D-Link DLP-655, so double-firewalled. I have been running Soft Firewalls on the PC itself.

I've little experience with SuperAntiSpyware. A name like that actually scares me, a bit. With all the over-hype associated with some of the rogue "anti-malware" sites out there.

Reading through this forum, though, it seems to have some respect.

 

And, of course, the user aspect is the most critical. most malware still requires an invitation. A line from some vampire movie comes to mind, "They have no power over you unless you invite them in."

 

Problem is this PC will be used by the grandkids. I have created user/non-admin accounts for each of them, which should limit the damage they can do.



#4 hamluis

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 02:14 PM

Well...considering the increasing frequency with which formerly respectable/safe download sites...now feature hidden installs of this-and-that...putting a computer in the hands of children today seems like a real gamble to me.  Heck, putting ones in the hands of a non-child who knows nothing at all of the dangers of surfing...is a gamble which probably can be verified by what seems to be ever-increasing cases of user malware situations.

 

I've never thought that limited accounts are really useful...I mean, they are somewhat controls to limit user privileges...but unless they limit connectivity, they won't be of any value as a "system defense", IMO.  But...I could be wrong.

 

Louis

 

The way that you posed the topic/question, it wound up in the XP forum.  But really, you ought to consider posing these sorts of issues in the General Security forum, since there are personnel there who have much better feel and more knowledge about such than I do.  Although I continue to use XP, I consider myself capable of bearing the risk...but I won't suggest that anyone continue to use an unsupported O/S that is more vulnerable each day.


Edited by hamluis, 31 October 2014 - 02:20 PM.


#5 Torvald

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 02:25 PM

SuperAntiSpyware is an excellent antimalware program, as is MalwareBytes Antimalware.  I use the free version of both of them myself, as on demand scanner/cleaners.  The paid subscription versions of them are supposed to provide some additional active protection, but I don't know much about that as I have too many family computers to maintain, so stick to free versions only.

 

As far as an antivrus program, Microsoft’s own Microsoft Security Essentials will supposedly support Windows XP through July 14, 2015.  Beyond that, you would need to switch to a different antivirus program.  The following article identifies several companies who will hopefully continue antivirus support for Windows XP for a longer time period:  http://www.av-test.org/en/news/news-single-view/the-end-is-nigh-for-windows-xp-these-anti-virus-software-products-will-continue-to-protect-xp-after/


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