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Windows 7, black screen with cursor after boot


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#1 Snyderlr23

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 01:29 PM

Running Windows 7 Ultimate

Yesterday my iolo System Mechanic software said it had quarantined a file, a I ran a scan using it's SystemShield and it found nothing. I ended up turning off my system and now no boot. I'm sure this is virus/malware related, I'm just too much of an ameture to get it fixed alone.

I have tired booting in safe mode and I get the same result, black screen, and a moblie cursor. I do have my Windows 7 disk, so I could get to a command promt I just don't know what commands are needed to be typed.

Any help is awesome. Thank you.

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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 01:37 PM

Flashing cursor is an indication you lost your boot loader

 

.http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/32523/how-to-manually-repair-windows-7-boot-loader-problems/



#3 Snyderlr23

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 02:36 PM

It's not a flashing cursor, it's 'solid' for lack of a better word and can be moved around the screen.

#4 sflatechguy

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 09:21 PM

Since you have a Windows 7 installation DVD, insert it into the CD player and boot the computer from the DVD. Press any key when prompted, select the language, time, currency and keyboard, click Next, then select Repair your computer. Select the operating system, and in the System recovery options, select Startup Repair.

 

If that doesn't solve it, boot back in to the same Windows recovery console from the DVD and try returning the PC to an earlier restore point with System Restore.

 

If that doesn't work, post back and we can try working from the command prompt.



#5 Snyderlr23

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 10:10 PM

I have tried the startup repair option and I get a message saying there is nothing to repair and everything should boot. I guess it's not lying as it gets all the way to what should be the user sign in screen, that's just black.

This will make your head explode: it didn't set up my restore points when I switched to 7. Feel like a dumbass. Trying to reboot in last working configuration doesn't work and probably because there isn't any restore points.

I've tried chkdsk at the command prompt, and it tells me everything should be fine...that's as far as I can get. I appreciate the help.

#6 sflatechguy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 01:42 AM

So you get the Windows starting logo, but the screen goes black before you can log on? That means the kernel loaded, but a faulty driver or service is preventing the system from proceeding to the logon screen.

 

You could try running sfc /scannow from from the Windows recovery console. You can get to that the same way to get to Safe Mode, just choose the Repair Your Computer option instead, then run the command from the command line window option.

 

You could also try enabling boot logging if sfc /scannow doesn't resolve the issue. Try booting up the computer again, it will save the bootlog in the C; drive as ntbtlog.txt. You can open and access that boot log by booting into the recovery console, moving to the command prompt option, and typing in Notepad %WinDir%\ntbtlog.txt. That will open the boot log in Notepad (yes, that will work from the recovery console). We'll be looking for log entries that begin "Did no load driver". Not every driver that fails to load indicates there's a problem; we're looking for critical system drivers that need to load and didn't.

 

Failing that, you may need to do a repair installation. Unfortunately, System Mechanic may be the real culprit here. So-called PC tuners and registry cleaners are, quite frankly, snake oil and can actually do more harm than good to your system. In this case, it may have quarantined a critical system file and that's why your PC will no longer boot. http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/312518/registry-cleaners/



#7 sflatechguy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 01:44 AM

So you get the Windows starting logo, but the screen goes black before you can log on? That means the kernel loaded, but a faulty driver or service is preventing the system from proceeding to the logon screen.

 

You could try running sfc /scannow from from the Windows recovery console. You can get to that the same way to get to Safe Mode, just choose the Repair Your Computer option instead, then run the command from the command line window option.

 

You could also try enabling boot logging if sfc /scannow doesn't resolve the issue. Try booting up the computer again, it will save the bootlog in the C; drive as ntbtlog.txt. You can open and access that boot log by booting into the recovery console, moving to the command prompt option, and typing in Notepad %WinDir%\ntbtlog.txt. That will open the boot log in Notepad (yes, that will work from the recovery console). We'll be looking for log entries that begin "Did no load driver". Not every driver that fails to load indicates there's a problem; we're looking for critical system drivers that need to load and didn't.

 

Failing that, you may need to do a repair installation. Unfortunately, System Mechanic may be the real culprit here. So-called PC tuners and registry cleaners are, quite frankly, snake oil and can actually do more harm than good to your system. In this case, it may have quarantined a critical system file and that's why your PC will no longer boot. http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/312518/registry-cleaners/



#8 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 07:12 AM

I'm a bit of an amature at this, so how exactly do I run the sfc/scannow? Is it as simple as typing that command at the prompt? Does it need to be a C: prompt? When I get to the prompt screen it starts me out as a X:

I agree that it could be SystemMechanic. I remember the quarantine alert saying something about a windows file, so a reinstall of the OS might be what I have to do. I have things like pictures and important files backed up on flash drives so I might just do that.

#9 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 07:20 AM

How do I do a repair install from the disk, not being able to log into Windows? Is there a repair option from the boot from disk option, choosing 'install' instead of repair?

#10 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 08:37 AM

I have found, that trying to run the sfc /scannow, it tells me a system repair is scheduled and I need to reboot and try again. I do reboot, but the only way I can is the warmboot.

#11 sflatechguy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 12:34 PM

I'm a bit of an amature at this, so how exactly do I run the sfc/scannow? Is it as simple as typing that command at the prompt? Does it need to be a C: prompt? When I get to the prompt screen it starts me out as a X:

 

To change the drive in the command window in the recovery environment, type in cd /d c:

 

I have found, that trying to run the sfc /scannow, it tells me a system repair is scheduled and I need to reboot and try again. I do reboot, but the only way I can is the warmboot.

 

Try running sfc /scannow from the recovery environment on the PC, rather than the DVD. When the computer boots, press F8 and select the Repair Your Computer option. To do a hard shutdown, type in shutdown /s at the command prompt; shutdown /r will reboot the system. The system repair is scheduled message means it is trying to run chkdsk, which indicates there are issues with your hard disk or system. Try entering chkntfs /x c: and rebooting to see if that stops chkdsk from trying to run and allow you to run sfc /scannow.

 

 

How do I do a repair install from the disk, not being able to log into Windows? Is there a repair option from the boot from disk option, choosing 'install' instead of repair?

 

Unfortunately, if you can't log on, you can't do a repair install, only a clean install. To back up important files beforehand, remove the hard drive, inset it into an external HD dock that has a USB cable, plug that into another computer and transfer over all the files to a folder or volume on the other computer.

 

 

I agree that it could be SystemMechanic. I remember the quarantine alert saying something about a windows file.

 

Yep, that would be the most likely issue.



#12 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:35 PM

For some reason shutdown /r or /s doesn't work. It tells me ''shutdown' is not a recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.' That seems weird. I just 'x' out of the command window and click on 'restart' on the Systems Recovery Options window. Hope that is fine.

I changed the prompt to c: and ran chkdsk and it gave me a message about errors and run chkdsk /f to fix. So I ran that but got something about other handles using the volume and they needing to be dismounted, force dismount would make all handles invalid. I told it to force dismount and it went thru chkdsk /f but at the end just had a flashing cursor no prompt. So I restarted.

Came back to the system recovery tool and and the prompt and tried chkntfs /x c:

#13 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:38 PM

Came back and tried to run sfc /scannow and it still tells me that there is a system repair pending and sfc /scannow can't run.

Any other ideas? Or is it time to hit Best Buy for a HD USB adapter?

And thank you very much for the help, I really appreciate you taking your free time to help me out.

#14 Snyderlr23

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:40 PM

Also, a thought, can I delet the SystemMechanic software from the command prompt and will that free up the quarantined file?

#15 sflatechguy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:59 PM

At this point, your only option is a clean install. Deleting SystemMechanic will probably just delete the quarantined file.

You can use an HD enclosure, or try booting from a Puppy Linux DVD to recover your user files: http://www.sysprobs.com/puppy-linux-recover-windows-7-files-boot




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