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Laptop display


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#1 Bellasky

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 11:50 AM

Half of my screen on my laptop just went white for no apparent reason. Any ideas to fix? Please and thank you!

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#2 ElfBane

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 06:01 AM

There are several things that could be wrong, none of which are particularly easy. First thing is to see if the display is normal using an external monitor. If the external monitor works fine, then see below;

 

So you'll know what we're looking at, there are 3 or 4 things that could be at fault;

 

1. The screen itself.  They are usually around $70-$100 in price.

2. The inverter. A small part, not very expensive usually, but it's usually not the failed part. But it's in the signal path and must be considered.

3. The wiring harness. If it's crimped, bent or partially broken, it can cause odd problems.

4. The mainboard. Usually quite expensive, and very challenging to replace if you've never done it before.

 

A PC shop would charge $250-$400 to troubleshoot and repair this. You can do it cheaper, but it won't be fast. You'll be ordering one-part-at-a-time, changing it in the lappy, then seeing if it's fixed. If it turns out to be the mainboard, then you've ordered those other parts for nought.

 

So, your options are,

A. Fix it yourself. Cheaper in the long run and you'll get a wealth of experience tearing down a lappy, but it won't be fast.

B. Let a PC shop fix it, at the above mentioned estimate.

C. Apply any monies mentioned toward a new lappy, instead of trying to fix the old one.

 






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