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Ambient room temperature.


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#1 helpmeobiwan

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 12:14 AM

A brief summary: I live on the second story level of an apartment complex and my bedroom (where my computer stuff is) faces the setting sun. Outside it is about 57 degrees F right now, and the temperature in my room is roughly 79 degrees just from the PC being on and me inside the room, exhaling, etc etc.. As of writing its midnight. So the radiant heat from the sun has had about 5 hours to dissipate. I am not even putting the PC under any load now but I can only imagine that the ambient temperature will rise even more once the fans kick in. My apartment must have severely good insulation to keep 20+ temperature difference from my computer and my body alone. Unless I vent my room I could easily see the room temperature going 85+ under load, for gaming, etc etc. On the cusp of fall. After doing a bunch of research I see a lot of guys running server rooms that fall within the 65 - 73 range, and they usually have to run a dedicated AC unit.

 

My question is this, how much do I have to fear hardware failure in my room? I can generally keep it at 77-79 with the door shut, and thats without bugging my parental unit to crank the AC..which to them sounds weird because it's 57 degrees outside and a decent 72-74 in the rest of the apartment.

 

I ponder about all the millions of other people in the world who live in less controllable situations, running the same types of hardware (or more) in consistently hotter temperatures. How do they do it?

 

My top concern is my data drives. I have 2 externals and 2 internals with data I simply cannot lose to hardware failure.

 

Maybe I'm just being paranoid. My only option is to buy a small portable AC unit but that seems, even for me, excessive to save my hardware, so long as I can keep this room below 90+...right?? Sometimes a perfect scenario is simply unobtainable...right??


Edited by helpmeobiwan, 28 October 2014 - 12:17 AM.


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#2 zingo156

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 08:07 AM

My computer room heats up to around 90F nearly all the time, in the summer sometimes closer to 95F, in the winter I can get the temp lower but with a fully loaded computer, it seems even with the window wide open it stays in the 80s. That said, I have yet to have any hardware failure due to heat.

 

A few things I do to prevent over heating inside the computer: fans, fans, fans, correclty setup fans make all of the difference as far as heat inside the box go. 90F ambient temperature is still safe for the computer, if you have enough airflow, the temperature inside of the case should be close to ambient unless under full load in which case it might go up a few degrees. I have 4 intake fans and 3 exhaust. Intake is on the front and bottom of the case, exhaust is out the rear and top of the case. A push pull setup like this seems to be the most effective.

 

Dust out your computer frequently, I live in a dusty environment, gravel road, wood burner, and a dog, I dust my computer out at least 2 times a year or more. Heat sinks can get plugged with dust and hair etc which causes no air to flow through the heat sink, this causes heat problems and could cause early failure due to heat.

 

As far as data backup goes: redundancy with extra backup on top of that is key, you should have the data duplicated to multiple devices and keep at least 1 backup device in a different location if you can not lose the data. I run a mirrored raid array (raid 1 with 2 hard drives) and have 2 external backups, one that I keep in the bank and one at home. I swap between the 2 external backups every month. The most I would lose is 1 month back. I also backup extremely important files to dropbox. If data is important, don't count on a few externals or single hard drives to prevent failure. I will use a burning airplane as an example of how redundancy can still fail. Airplanes are all about redundant systems, however a burning airplane might still crash. If all of your eggs are in one basket and that basket gets destroyed, you may lose everything.


Edited by zingo156, 28 October 2014 - 08:09 AM.

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#3 helpmeobiwan

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 06:43 PM

Ok, so I should definitely be running out to grab more externals as soon as possible. Should I invest in Blu-ray for archival purposes? Would that be a sufficient option for something in case my hard drives fail?

 

Right now I have a bunch of material that took me years to acquire, and can't be found anymore, outside of my own device. The setup i'm running consists of roughly 2tb of noteworthy material on 1 internal drive, about 1.5TB in size. The remaining data I'd like to preserve...for basically forever, is located on 2 externals, both 3 TB My Book USB drives. I have only vary recently started using either as frequently as I have now, all of the previous time I've owned them was during the time I hoarded data.


Edited by helpmeobiwan, 28 October 2014 - 06:48 PM.


#4 zingo156

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 07:09 AM

I frequently see external hard drives fail, most likely due to being dropped or moved while running. Hard drives are very sensitive while in a running state. Also even when not running, dropping a hard drive might mean the end of it.

 

Certainly blu ray would be a reasonable archive, though discs have a shelf life as well. There is no perfect infinite backup outside of frequent duplication of data to newer storage devices. Plan on replacing external hard drives every couple of years. Keep the old ones as redundant backups. Keep the data in at least 2 places at any given time. 2 failures in a row is rare but can happen, I keep all extremely important files on no less than 3 devices at any time and one of those devices is in a different location. This is probably the best option. The cloud storage lately has been replacing my bank storage drive, mostly because it takes time to go to the bank, pull the drive out, do a backup, and then return the drive to the bank. Cloud storage I can just click a few buttons while having a cup of coffee.


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