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Who did most for comedy, of all time?


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#1 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 08:03 PM

We all like our comedians, comic actors, et cetera, but of them all, who was most influential?
 
I've stumped myself, here. I asked the question but struggled to find an answer. If I get enough answers, I could rank them in some sort of table, calling it 'funniest man of all time (as rated by bleeping computer)'.
 
Nowi know that I'm British and will therefore be biased, but that doesn't matter. For instance, Charlie made his films in America...oh, but he was born in London. Buster Keaton, then. He's not British.
 
Anyway, you get it. My favourite is Spike Milligan. His headstone reads: I told you I was Ill.
 
That says it all.
 
Who's your most influential comedian?

Edited by Queen-Evie, 27 October 2014 - 08:12 PM.
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#2 Animal

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 08:30 PM

I can't pick just one. Different comics for different era's. Also depends on the genre too. Not to mention is it TV, Movies, Stand up? Do we consider gender differences as well?

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#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:06 PM

Red Skelton was a master of all forms of comedy.  He could play the straight man or the goof and get the biggest laughs.  His Sunday night TV shows were a staple for the boomers and many more generations who experienced his performances.



#4 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:22 PM

I can't pick just one. Different comics for different era's. Also depends on the genre too. Not to mention is it TV, Movies, Stand up? Do we consider gender differences as well?

I wasn't thinking of gender differences, just funny.

 

I haven't met many celebs...in fact I've only met one...that was Dawn French, a British commedian. I liked her instantly. Just go for who's funniest, male or female! The point of the post was to see who's the most influential comic.

 

By the way, you're in the running because I love the cat! Is it a Russian Blue? Maybe the cold war's still raging and your humble pussycat is transmitting vital information to Spetsnaz, or the Kremlin! Tomorrow morning, I suggest filling his food bowl and walking casually through to where you normally put it down. Instead of simply giving the cat its food, tease it for several minutes, wafting the dish of tempting fragrances over its head. Keep on saying things like: 'food, puss!': 'Yumm, yumm', and the likes. (This is an accepted technique for exposing feline russian agents.)

 

Eventually, the cat may say something like 'идиот', or 'пошел на хуй'*. This is a sign of frustration and anger. Also, it is a hint that your cat is not all that it seems to be...Summon MI5, or your national equivalent, as soon as your pet begins to speak Russian in this way.**

 

* I cannot translate these coments, because they are...err...very rude. Use your imagination!

 

** Except if you are Russian and so is your cat. In this case, tell it not to be so rude...in Russian, of course...or else it won't understand.



#5 Queen-Evie

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:25 PM

I grew up watching Red Skelton every week.

There was also Flip Wilson (the devil made me buy this dress)(when he dressed up as Geraldine) and the classic The Church Of What's Happening Now. You can find clips on you tube.

Bill Cosby, what he does everyone can relate to.

Carol Burnette and all who appeared on her show were comic geniuses. They often strayed from the script and didn't miss a beat.

Lucille Ball, who paved the way for women in comedy.

There are simply to many who contributed to the comedy genre to list.

edit to add: my favorite comedy bit of all time is from MASH, season 3, episode 21. It concerned a visit to the 4077th from Gen. MacArthur. The entire episode was hilarious but at the end Klinger was dressed as the Statue of Liberty, complete with sparklers. MacArthur salutes him. Everytime I see that part I laugh to the point tears. MASH did some very funny episodes.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 27 October 2014 - 09:32 PM.


#6 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:34 PM

Red Skelton was a master of all forms of comedy.  He could play the straight man or the goof and get the biggest laughs.  His Sunday night TV shows were a staple for the boomers and many more generations who experienced his performances.

Yes. He also talked about every day feelings. "Every man makes mistakes, but married men find out about them sooner."

 

Being British, I've not seen much of him (or heard him, since it was mainly radio) but I get that...

 

...He goes inrto the 'Bleeping computer' comedy archives!



#7 Ted Striker

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:35 PM

We all like our comedians, comic actors, et cetera, but of them all, who was most influential?
 

 

I'm not sure how to answer this one.  Maybe it's a standup comedian or a comedic actor or maybe a writer who stayed off camera.  It's an interesting discussion though.

 

 

 


I've stumped myself, here. I asked the question but struggled to find an answer. If I get enough answers, I could rank them in some sort of table, calling it 'funniest man of all time (as rated by bleeping computer)'.

 

As for the funniest, in no particular order, here are some of my favourites:

 

Curly Howard - In my opinion, he was the funniest member of The Three Stooges.  His physical comedy, timing, facial expressions and delivery was unbelievable.

 

George Carlin - In addition to being one of the funniest comedians, he should also be considered one of the most influential as he took on topics that most, if not all, comedians avoided. 

 

John Ritter - I really don't think any actor in the world could have played Jack Tripper better than him.  I believe Lucille Ball said that no one was better than John Ritter at physical comedy. (I think she was referring to actors in his era).

 

Leslie Nielsen - I particularly enjoyed his deadpan comedy routine in Police Squad! (TV Show) and in the Airplane! & Naked Gun movies. 

 

Richard Pryor - He should also be considered one of the most influential due to the type of topics he would joke about.

 

Jim Carrey - His over the top style made him a perfect choice to be a cast member of In Living Color. We'll see him on the big screen again soon when Dumb and Dumber To is released.

 

Eddie Murphy - I'm a big fan of his standup comedy, especially Delirious.  I like all the characters he would invent and play out in his standup.

 

Ricky Gervais - I think he should qualify to be on this list even if he had only created David Brent and The Office and did nothing else. :)

 

There are so many more but off the top of my head, these are some of my favourite comedians.


Edited by Ted Striker, 27 October 2014 - 09:36 PM.


#8 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:47 PM

I grew up watching Red Skelton every week.

There was also Flip Wilson (the devil made me buy this dress)(when he dressed up as Geraldine) and the classic The Church Of What's Happening Now. You can find clips on you tube.

Bill Cosby, what he does everyone can relate to.

Carol Burnette and all who appeared on her show were comic geniuses. They often strayed from the script and didn't miss a beat.

Lucille Ball, who paved the way for women in comedy.

There are simply to many who contributed to the comedy genre to list.

edit to add: my favorite comedy bit of all time is from MASH, season 3, episode 21. It concerned a visit to the 4077th from Gen. MacArthur. The entire episode was hilarious but at the end Klinger was dressed as the Statue of Liberty, complete with sparklers. MacArthur salutes him. Everytime I see that part I laugh to the point tears. MASH did some very funny episodes.

Ah, we digress!

 

Remember, people, we are meant to be deciding on the most influential comics of all time, not just remeniscing. Having said that, even as a Brit, I a was chuckling about M.A.S.H. I remember that episode!

 

There is still a point to this, though. I'lm niot too sure about Bing, though. He sang and played parts in movies. I don't see him as influencial in comedy. Maybe you can enlighten me on this?



#9 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 09:56 PM

I grew up watching Red Skelton every week.

There was also Flip Wilson (the devil made me buy this dress)(when he dressed up as Geraldine) and the classic The Church Of What's Happening Now. You can find clips on you tube.

Bill Cosby, what he does everyone can relate to.

Carol Burnette and all who appeared on her show were comic geniuses. They often strayed from the script and didn't miss a beat.

Lucille Ball, who paved the way for women in comedy.

There are simply to many who contributed to the comedy genre to list.

edit to add: my favorite comedy bit of all time is from MASH, season 3, episode 21. It concerned a visit to the 4077th from Gen. MacArthur. The entire episode was hilarious but at the end Klinger was dressed as the Statue of Liberty, complete with sparklers. MacArthur salutes him. Everytime I see that part I laugh to the point tears. MASH did some very funny episodes.

I've already made a comment about M.A.S.H.

 

A lot of British people don't get American comedy. I suppose that's just cultural. I can only speak personally and personally I love M.A.S.H.! I don't get Lucille Ball as being ground-breaking though.



#10 Queen-Evie

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 10:16 PM

As I said, Lucille Ball paved the way for women in comedy, especially women as leading ladies and stars of the show.

You are right about it not being ground-breaking, at least not in the sense of anything new to comedy. What she did was slapstick, which had been around before she started doing it.

If you want me to pick out the most influential, I cannot do that.

Some influenced comedic television. Others stand-up or women or racial.

There are to many layers to influential to pick one.

#11 raptorman

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 10:42 PM

As I said, Lucille Ball paved the way for women in comedy, especially women as leading ladies and stars of the show.

You are right about it not being ground-breaking, at least not in the sense of anything new to comedy. What she did was slapstick, which had been around before she started doing it.

If you want me to pick out the most influential, I cannot do that.

Some influenced comedic television. Others stand-up or women or racial.

There are to many layers to influential to pick one.

Sorry. Maybe over here we see things differently.. There is definitely a time that women came into comedy. That has to be significant. I liked Joan Rivers for one.Maybe that's another topic? Women in comedy.

 

It strikes me that women play a subservient role, even now. Having said that, as a man, I've watched heaps of stand-up comics and I have to say thast the males are funnier. Why is this?



#12 Animal

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 11:49 PM

It strikes me that women play a subservient role, even now. Having said that, as a man, I've watched heaps of stand-up comics and I have to say thast the males are funnier. Why is this?


I don't think Sarah Silverman, as only one of many examples, has a subservient atom in her body. I think women are and can be equally as funny as men. It may very well be a difference between US and UK comedy talent and or culture. There is a massive comedy climate in the US with the college(university) and comedy club circuit.

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#13 raptorman

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 07:17 PM

 

It strikes me that women play a subservient role, even now. Having said that, as a man, I've watched heaps of stand-up comics and I have to say thast the males are funnier. Why is this?


I don't think Sarah Silverman, as only one of many examples, has a subservient atom in her body. I think women are and can be equally as funny as men. It may very well be a difference between US and UK comedy talent and or culture. There is a massive comedy climate in the US with the college(university) and comedy club circuit.

 

You could well be correct that this particular woman was not subservient, but you will note that I never said that she was. Nor did I say that women are subservient to men. I am totally opposed to that kind of thinking. When i said that women play a subserviant part in comedy, that was mere observation. It in no way reflected my personal opinion.. I'm not sexist, far from it. However, I don't agree that women are as funny as men. This is not just my opinion. as a man: There is something that is genetically inherited that makes men more inclined to joke...at least that is my view.

 

Must go. Pink Floyd are about to play Comfortably Numb (on the Hi-Fi, you understand: The last time I asked Dave and his band to play live in my lounge, he was very abrupt. I have therefore banned the b?@£$%^& from appearing here.) andI have to listen to the second guitar solo.

 

Bye!



#14 Queen-Evie

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 07:46 PM

raptorman, there is no need to quote every post you reply to.
You can either address by name the person you are replying to OR if you must quote use only whatever would relevant for your reply.

Like this

There is something that is genetically inherited that makes men more inclined to joke...at least that is my view


Apparently you have never spent any time around a group of women gathered together. I assure you we are very inclined to joke, and we do. When men aren't around during our "hen parties" we have a rip-roaring hilarious time together. Jokes are bit part of that, and they are usually jokes about men and their foibles (always good for laughs).

Bless your heart, you are entitled to your views/opinions.

#15 Animal

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 10:57 PM

Could very well be a matter of personal preference. Guy humor vs Womens humor. British humor vs American humor. Juvenile humor vs high brow humor.

It's all about diversity and something for everyone. I mean really, when you were 10, 11, 12 or even 13 tell me you didn't think fart jokes were the funniest thing in the world... Those are internationally hilarious... :P

Except for that stuck up girl Shelly down the street. She didn't think anything was funny. Except that one time her brother Steven got his pant leg caught up in his bicycle chain. Then he crashed into the tree and broke his arm.... :) (names were fictionalized to protect the innocent)

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