Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

CPU upgrade for ageing Dell Inspiron 531 CPU


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 raptorman

raptorman

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cumbria, England
  • Local time:03:41 AM

Posted 27 October 2014 - 10:51 AM

Hi folks!

 

I have already upgraded the video card and PSU on my old Dell. I've even got 4 GB of Kingston Ram to replace the original 2GB 326 MHz DDR2 RAM. I've replaced the PSU with a Corsair CM430. What is really holding me back for playing any modern games is the CPU.

 

Is there any hope for the old girl? The motherboard is the original M2N61-AX, complete with Athlon 64x2 5000+ CPU on an AM2 socket.

 

Can I get even a modestly fast CPU in there? I don't want to use too much power, bearing in mind the 430 W supply. Could anyone recommend a micro ATX mobo and reasonable CPU that will be a significant upgrade? I don't really want to have to buy a new chassis, so temperature could be a problem, too.

 

Here's what the motherboard needs to run:

three rear usb 2 ports and audio jack

two front usb 2 ports would be adequate

two SATA connections for optical drives

two SATA connections for HDD

Geforce GTX 750 Ti graphics card

 

I hope you can help, because that old CPU is a real pain in the neck!



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,178 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:04:41 AM

Posted 27 October 2014 - 03:22 PM

I'm not sure how easy it is to put different motherboards in a Dell case.  If it's a totally standard MATX layout and allows you to remove the IO shield (this is the plate that contains the cut outs that the ports go into) and fit the new one in that comes with the new motherboard, then it should be easy.  If the cut outs are built into the case itself, then it's going to add complications.

 

To be honest, a decent case can be pretty cheap anyway.  The RAM would also have to be changed as DDR2 is not used on any current boards.  The CPU could be anything from a budget AMD Athlon X4 860K or Pentium G3258 (excellent performers for the money IMO) to a Core i7 4790K.  It really depends on what your budget is for the total upgrade.


Edited by jonuk76, 27 October 2014 - 03:23 PM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#3 raptorman

raptorman
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cumbria, England
  • Local time:03:41 AM

Posted 27 October 2014 - 04:16 PM

I'm not sure how easy it is to put different motherboards in a Dell case.  If it's a totally standard MATX layout and allows you to remove the IO shield (this is the plate that contains the cut outs that the ports go into) and fit the new one in that comes with the new motherboard, then it should be easy.  If the cut outs are built into the case itself, then it's going to add complications.

 

To be honest, a decent case can be pretty cheap anyway.  The RAM would also have to be changed as DDR2 is not used on any current boards.  The CPU could be anything from a budget AMD Athlon X4 860K or Pentium G3258 (excellent performers for the money IMO) to a Core i7 4790K.  It really depends on what your budget is for the total upgrade.

Thanks for that.

 

I've only heard that standard micro ATX fits. I guess I'll find out. I'm not too bothered about taking the whole guts out and drilling/cutting the chassis...I've re-built and modified motorbikes, sometimes fabricating my own custom parts for them, so that should be a doddle.

 

I've found a micro ATX mobo by ASRock that looks to give me all the required connections and ports. It supports DDR2 and DDR3 (2 slots each), so I guess I could get by on a couple of GB of RAM  until i can get more. I've also tracked down an AMD Phenom II x6 1075T CPU, which is supported by that board. It's not the bees knees by today's standards, but as I said, anything is an improvement on the Athlon 5000+. The comparative benchmark scores are 1315 and 5423.

 

The other advantage is that it's peak power is only 125W. Since the GtX 750 TI is also pretty frugal for its performance at 62W (Tom's hardware figure), My Corsair 430W PSU should be having a life of luxury. The gear's on the way now, so we'll just have to wait and see. If it all fits, I should have no worries. The Corsair PSU already boasts a much bigger cooling fan than the original Dell unit, so temperature shouldn't be a problem...or will it?

 

I've just had a thought...doh! Will the original heat sink and CPU fan cool the new CPU? 125W is a long way off the original 65W. Do I try it and hope, or do I get a new sink and fan?



#4 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,178 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:04:41 AM

Posted 27 October 2014 - 08:12 PM

Well not the latest stuff, but it'll certainly be an improvement over the CPU you have now :)

 

You might need a better cooler.  I don't know for sure but my hunch is that stock cooling will be adequate for the supplied CPU, but probably not for one that uses double the power (potentially meaning double the heat output).  Again, they don't have to cost a fortune.  This sort of thing should be OK for standard speeds if it will fit the case (it's not too tall as aftermarket coolers go) - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B006344OMM/?tag=pcp0f-21

 

The PSU will be fine of course.  The CPU is rarely a problem, it's very high power video cards that push the PSU requirements up a lot.  The GTX 750 is one of the most efficient around.


Edited by jonuk76, 27 October 2014 - 08:12 PM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#5 raptorman

raptorman
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cumbria, England
  • Local time:03:41 AM

Posted 28 October 2014 - 06:38 PM

Well not the latest stuff, but it'll certainly be an improvement over the CPU you have now :)

 

You might need a better cooler.  I don't know for sure but my hunch is that stock cooling will be adequate for the supplied CPU, but probably not for one that uses double the power (potentially meaning double the heat output).  Again, they don't have to cost a fortune.  This sort of thing should be OK for standard speeds if it will fit the case (it's not too tall as aftermarket coolers go) - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B006344OMM/?tag=pcp0f-21

 

The PSU will be fine of course.  The CPU is rarely a problem, it's very high power video cards that push the PSU requirements up a lot.  The GTX 750 is one of the most efficient around.

Thanks for the tip about the cooler. The reasonI went for the GTX 750 Ti was power consumption v performance...I'm a bit of a hippy: I don'tlike waste. I was also concerned (as an engineer) that excessive power use could overheat the components. This problem may be partly nullified by the massively increased airflow through the Corsair PSU fan). I've bookmarked the page that I can buy the cooler from. I'l do it.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users