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SURELY Macs are backward-compatible - aren't they?


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#1 ulrichburke

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 08:51 PM

Dear Anyone.

 

OK. For starters, I love Macs like arachnophobic blondes love tarantulas, but I got given this Apple OSX 10.8.5 Imac so I decided to at least try to use it.  Went into a charity shop and saw a CD full of Applemac apps, bought it, shoved it into the machine. And everything's coming up 'Cannot be opened because Classic O.S. is no longer supported'. 

 

Now I don't think it's a faulty CD although second hand because it seems to be reading everything just fine. But I mean I've got Windows 98 software that's running fine on Windows XP.  Applemacs annoy the heck out of me because of lots of little things (like you can't watch any films on them/play online games on them because they're not advanced enough to use Flash, for Gawd's sake! I mean, they're on Operating System 10 (OSX) and they STILL can't use Flash, come on, guys!) But they've GOTTA  be backwardly-compatible, no? Every computer's backwardly-compatible, just can't work out how to make the Mac recognise the older software. 

 

Please, can someone explain to me how to make OSX 10.8.5 recognise older software (be backwardly-compatible)? It's just that, along with everything else Apple, modern software costs a fortune (the other reason I don't like 'em, they're overpriced vastly, every time I see the cost of a Mac I think how much more PC I could get for the same money but, like I said, I got given this thing...) Wanted to see if I could actually USE it before spending money on software for it (it doesn't have the freeware base PCs do, another thing that niggles me....)

 

Yours hopefully

 

Chris.



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 09:34 PM

I believe Classic means programs  written for the PowerPC CPU. Apple transitioned to intel CPU's and the software is not compatible. The software you purchased is probably for the Intel CPU Macs.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OS_X#PowerPC.E2.80.93Intel_transition

 

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2751678?tstart=0



#3 ulrichburke

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 11:18 PM

Dear John_C21 et al.

 

I'm sorry, I should have said, culpa estis meum (and all that!)

 

The Mac in question is an OSX PPC mac, that's why I bought the disc. It's still saying it can't open any of the software cos it's Classic (whatever that means, I dunno!) but are you saying some PPC software is more compatible than others?  I mean, that's like the Linux nightmare where you have to have 4 different versions of Linux to run 5 different pieces of software (I know this, I've been there, visiting online repositories, incompatible desktops, having to do everything with CLI because there's no way of using the pretty desktop to do what you want.... I know PCs aren't perfect - but then look at the opposition!)

 

Yours respectfully

 

Chris, sorry for not saying my Mac is PPC.



#4 Buddyme2

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 04:27 AM

Classic is installed on PPC Macs running versions up to OS X 10.4.8 only. You can try using SheepShaver if your Mac is running OS X 10.5.8 to run your apps.



#5 smax013

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 12:49 PM

As noted, you need the "Classic" environment to run an Mac OS 9 or earlier based programs on a Mac running Mac OS X. Apple did provide the Classic environment with the Mac OS up through Mac OS X 10.4, but like all companies decided that they would not support it indefinitely. Thus, with Mac OS 10.5 and newer (which includes Mac OS X 10.8.5), Apple no longer supports the Classic environment.

So, you can either revert the Mac back to Mac OS X 10.4.x or use a third party option like the previous mentioned SheepShaver (there are a couple others). I will note that for either option, you will also need install discs for Mac OS 9 or earlier as well, since all options are basically setting this up to allow you to run an earlier version of the Mac OS (9 or earlier) in an emulator.

#6 staygold512

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 08:34 AM

If you install an earlier (previous) version of the Mac OS X than what was included, your computer may exhibit unexpected behavior such as:

  • The trackpad or mouse may not respond properly
  • The computer may stop responding
  • Sleep/wake issues may occur
  • The display image may appear to "shrink" with black bars around it, may appear tinted, or have other issues
  • Loss of built-in audio
  • Loss of Bluetooth or AirPort functionality
  • May not start up past the Apple logo

 

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht2186   

 

The last two versions of Mac OS X were FREE and the prior 3 were $19.99. I'm not seeing where the software  "costs a fortune". 

I've also never had issue's playing Flash on either of my Mac's. 



#7 NickAu

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 04:12 PM

I mean, that's like the Linux nightmare where you have to have 4 different versions of Linux to run 5 different pieces of software (I know this, I've been there, visiting online repositories, incompatible desktops, having to do everything with CLI because there's no way of using the pretty desktop to do what you want.

Really? And what distros, software and desktops would that be?

 

I run Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

 

When I open my Software Centre all 75104 items listed will run on my Operating system.

3353wn9.png

 

 

Installing a De is not that hard its in Software Centre. Search for it then click to install, This applies to all the software in the Software Centre.

2eqe5au.png

 

 

 

Installing from terminal will yield the same result. Eg Typing

sudo apt-get install LXDE

Will install LXDE from the Buntu Repo .

How to Install the Lightweight LXDE Desktop on Ubuntu

Yes real hard. That about covers the Desktop thing.

 

 

 

Next .

 

CLI because there's no way of using the pretty desktop to do what you want

 

Example.

 

If I install Clam av.

sudo apt-get install clamav

The only way to use it is Via terminal.

 

Now if I do it this way.

sudo apt-get install clamav clamtk

Now I have added a GUI to clam so I can point and click.\

ClamTk is a graphical interface for Clam Antivirus

 

jNzI9.png

 

 

 

 

 

What online repos?

 
 

 

Ripping CD's I could do it thru a something like RipCD with a GUI

 

or  I can do it via the CLI

http://helpdeskgeek.com/linux-tips/rip-encode-cds-from-the-linux-terminal/

 

I prefer CLI.

 

I do admit there a some programs that only run in terminal, However I doubt the novice user would use them anyway. This is true for Mac, Windows and Linux.

 

 

4. Mac OS X is merely a locked down version of open-source Linux. Its easy to assume that over 90% of Mac owners are not only unaware of this, but don’t have a clue what Linux is. Turns out that back in 1996, after Steve Jobs’ short-lived company NeXT stole its OS base from open-source (read: FREE) BSD Unix, it resold the now proprietary OS to Apple which then became OS X. Perhaps if OS X had the flexibility of Linux, or if Mac fanboys didn’t use Linux concepts (i.e. Terminal) as reasons to brag about OS X, there wouldn’t be so much smearing to do. (Warning: do NOT attempt ask any Mac fanboys about this, or they will ignore your question and start babbling about things like Firefox.)

http://www.collegetimes.tv/why-mac-sucks/

 

 

EDITED FOR SCREENSHOTS


Edited by NickAu1, 30 October 2014 - 10:14 PM.


#8 cat1092

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 10:27 PM

 

Mac OS X is merely a locked down version of open-source Linux.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

Just a few proprietary modifications & it's called Mac OS, followed by the name of a wild or exotic cat. 

 

The hardware of an $1200 iMac would build a middle of the road Windows or Linux computer, possibly two. I'm not speaking of the type of glass used, the frame made of expensive metals, nor a keyboard made to almost automotive specs, of which neither of the latter offers anything to the bottom line on benchmarking charts, rather the type of CPU chosen, the amount of RAM, and cheap inbuilt GPU's that does.  

 

 

 

 every time I see the cost of a Mac I think how much more PC I could get for the same money

Yeah me too, which is why I don't have one. There actually was one time that I wanted one in the late 90's, and could have had one, but during the presentation, the salesperson spent more time dogging what I had & stating that Windows was an inferior OS, rather than explaining how his was better, what I came to hear. The only thing he said in regards to the product itself, was that it was more than a just a mere computer, rather a culture. 

 

So I took my 'junk' back home & never looked back. I was contacted by a Apple rep a week or so later to ask me about the presentation, and was offered a 25% discount coupon that could be redeemed at any Apple store, I told her to send it to someone more needy, or to someone in their culture. 

 

A computer is a machine built out of components, and in itself, represents nothing to me, other than a tool for me to use. I buy them, and if I don't like the OS installed on them, I install what I want, normally Windows 7 & the latest Linux MInt LTS release. 

 

I'm not going to pay for an overpriced computer that won't run today's OS's, no matter how nice the machine looks. Some not too old Apple computers, by computer standards, won't run the latest releases of Mac OS. This is by design, to force the crowd to upgrade machines every few years. On the PC side of things, many 2006/07 model computers are running the Windows Technical Preview fine & the latest Linux titles. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 NickAu

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 10:32 PM

 

Just a few proprietary modifications & it's called Mac OS, followed by the name of a wild or exotic cat.

Mountain Lion, Snow Leopard?, Sounds a lot like Saucy Salamander and Trusty Thar LOL.



#10 smax013

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 10:42 PM

Applemacs annoy the heck out of me because of lots of little things (like you can't watch any films on them/play online games on them because they're not advanced enough to use Flash, for Gawd's sake! I mean, they're on Operating System 10 (OSX) and they STILL can't use Flash, come on, guys!)


I should note that Mac can in fact use Flash. Apple just does not ship a Mac with Flash installed, but you can certainly go to Adobe's Flash site and download and install Flash if you want.

http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

You might be thinking of iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, iPad Mini)...those CANNOT use Flash.

#11 smax013

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:02 PM

 

4. Mac OS X is merely a locked down version of open-source Linux. Its easy to assume that over 90% of Mac owners are not only unaware of this, but don’t have a clue what Linux is. Turns out that back in 1996, after Steve Jobs’ short-lived company NeXT stole its OS base from open-source (read: FREE) BSD Unix, it resold the now proprietary OS to Apple which then became OS X. Perhaps if OS X had the flexibility of Linux, or if Mac fanboys didn’t use Linux concepts (i.e. Terminal) as reasons to brag about OS X, there wouldn’t be so much smearing to do. (Warning: do NOT attempt ask any Mac fanboys about this, or they will ignore your question and start babbling about things like Firefox.)

http://www.collegetimes.tv/why-mac-sucks/
 
 
EDITED FOR SCREENSHOTS

 


Not to be picky, but apparently the author of the article you linked to does not fully know what Linux is either as the Mac OS does not use Linux as its "base". It uses BSD at its core not Linux. While both are "UNIX-like" OSs, there are differences...one of the biggest in their licensing. Another is that BSD is actually derived from UNIX, while Linux was essentially a newly created OS meant to mimic UNIX.

But, hey, what do I know, I am just a dumb Mac user (and Windows user and at times a UNIX user).   :grinner: 

Everyone has something that works for their needs and no one should disparage them or their choice of computers/OSs for picking what works for them. Computers are tools. Pick whichever tool works the best for you and don't worry too much about what others use.


Edited by smax013, 30 October 2014 - 11:02 PM.


#12 cat1092

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:03 PM

The non-inclusion of Flash by Apple 4 years back was for security reasons, kind of like most PC's today no longer ships with Java. Only a small percentile needs the latter, while at the moment, many still needs Flash. 

 

Plus at the time, the late Apple founder was pushing hard for HTML5. 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/blog/2010/oct/23/apple-flash-war-steve-jobs-continues

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 smax013

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:06 PM

If you install an earlier (previous) version of the Mac OS X than what was included, your computer may exhibit unexpected behavior such as:

  • The trackpad or mouse may not respond properly
  • The computer may stop responding
  • Sleep/wake issues may occur
  • The display image may appear to "shrink" with black bars around it, may appear tinted, or have other issues
  • Loss of built-in audio
  • Loss of Bluetooth or AirPort functionality
  • May not start up past the Apple logo
http://support.apple.com/kb/ht2186   
 
The last two versions of Mac OS X were FREE and the prior 3 were $19.99. I'm not seeing where the software  "costs a fortune". 
I've also never had issue's playing Flash on either of my Mac's. 


I assume you mean "was originally included when the Mac was originally sold". If so then yes, you are correct.

For a used computer, however, going back to an older Mac OS should be fine as long as it is not older than what was originally shipped with that model of Mac when it was originally released. Of course, going to an older OS might mean that you no longer get security updates from Apple, so use older Mac OS versions (and Windows OS versions) with caution if they no longer get security updates.

#14 smax013

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:08 PM

The non-inclusion of Flash by Apple 4 years back was for security reasons, kind of like most PC's today no longer ships with Java. Only a small percentile needs the latter, while at the moment, many still needs Flash. 
 
Plus at the time, the late Apple founder was pushing hard for HTML5. 
 
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/blog/2010/oct/23/apple-flash-war-steve-jobs-continues
 
Cat


Yes, Jobs did not like Flash. But, Mac can still install and use Flash (unlike iOS devices).

#15 cat1092

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:26 PM

While I don't care to get too deep in this debate, as I stated in watered down version above in Post #8, and in more detailed posts years past (why I stuck with Windows over Apple), the very first point that's in the article that Nick quoted is on the money. 

 

 

 

1. The only business model for Apple is narcissism.

 

That's a perfect description of the salesperson whom wasted 30 minutes of my time, not counting the trip there & back, and the very reason why I chose not to be an Apple owner. 

 

I'll give him credit though, maybe he was testing my waters, letting me know what I was in for. If so, he performed his job with precision. Looking back on it, he probably done me a favor, as I'm in no position now to buy a new Mac every 5-6 years to get the latest versions of the Mac OS. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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