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How to install windows 7 on an widows xp machine with erased hard drive?


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#1 smithcraig

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 01:38 AM

Hey All,

I have a windows xp machine, a Lenovo 3000 j series tower. It has:

athlon x 2 4000+ dual core @ 2.1ghz
2gb ram
160gb hard drive - erased with no OS.

I would like to install windows 7 home edition. What's the best way to do this? Will the windows xp COA work on windows 7?

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#2 Platypus

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 02:01 AM

As has been mentioned before, an XP product key is not applicable at all to Windows 7. To install Windows 7 you will need either the full product (OEM or consumer version) in which case it can be installed directly using its own product key, or a Windows 7 upgrade pack. The upgrade is also supplied with its own product key, but is intended to be installed as an upgrade to a functioning Windows installation. It can however only directly upgrade Windows Vista - even where a valid XP COA licence exists, a fresh installation needs to be done, so an erased hard drive is fine:

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-AU/windows7/help/upgrading-from-windows-xp-to-windows-7#T1=tab01


Edited by Platypus, 23 October 2014 - 02:07 AM.

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#3 cat1092

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 03:09 AM

smithcraig, since this is our first meet, I'd like to take this opportunity to  :welcome:you to BC Forums! 

 

Since you've wiped you drive, I see one option, and you'll probably need to act before October 31, or 7 Home Premium may not be an option to you. Get yourself a Windows 7 "OEM" license, which will include media, make sure it select your correct bit version. If the RAM cannot be upgraded to more than 2GB, then 32 bit will be fine. If it can be upgraded to 4GB or more, then go for 64 bit. That is a Brisbane CPU you have there, so it supports 64 bit. I have had two such computers, one I still have and in the process of stuffing the RAM to 8GB. 

 

Mine runs the Athlon 64 X2 4850e, but is lower wattage than yours at 45W. Yours is the 65W model, with enough RAM, you can run Windows 7 64 bit fine. I take it this is your CPU. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103774

 

The OEM is perfect solution for wiped drives, but you do need to be sure to have your drivers handy before you begin the install. As soon as you boot into Windows, and the rebooting is over & it settles down, the chipset driver is the first you need to install. I know that for Lenovo, this can be tricky, the driver extracts to a folder, then it's left to you to find it & finish the install & reboot. Next comes your networking driver, and except the video, which may require other updates first, you can install the rest of the rivers is whatever order you wish. Before running Windows Update. 

 

Any drivers that you can't find, Windows Update will offer, you can hide these, as it's one of the least desirable places to get updates from. Try to find others elsewhere, but don't bother with automated driver sites, some are generic & may or may not install. The sure way to see what needs installing is by opening the Device Manager in the Control Panel. 

 

Oh, and though you don't have much time for 7 Home Premium, you can always download a copy of Windows 7 & try it for 30 days. If it runs well, purchase a OEM version. You should check your local laws as to how long the Home Premium version of Windows 7 will be available. In the US, computers with 7 Home Premium cannot be sold through mainstream retailers after October 31, unless MS changes their mind. 

 

Here's the page with links, you'll probably want the Home Premium or Pro version. These are perfectly legal downloads & no COA has to be entered for 30 days. It says "Windows full installation disks used for system repair", but these are legit, full working versions, from MS approved source. 

 

http://best-windows.vlaurie.com/boot-disks.html#full

 

Good Luck with Windows 7. :thumbup2:

 

It's much better than Windows 8 or 8.1, which began a bad era for Microsoft. From that point on, they can see all that it's customers does, and it won't get better. Windows 7 is indeed your best option from XP. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 smithcraig

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 12:33 PM

 

Get yourself a Windows 7 "OEM" license, which will include media, make sure it select your correct bit version. If the RAM cannot be upgraded to more than 2GB, then 32 bit will be fine. If it can be upgraded to 4GB or more, then go for 64 bit. That is a Brisbane CPU you have there, so it supports 64 bit. I have had two such computers, one I still have and in the process of stuffing the RAM to 8GB. 

 

How do I go about in getting a Windows 7 "OEM" License?

 

Will the CPU handle 8GB RAM? or is 4GM RAM enough?



#5 dc3

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 01:09 PM

The first thing I would suggest doing would be to download the Windows Upgrade Advisor and run it to see if this computer is going to be compatible with Windows 7.


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#6 cat1092

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:59 PM

smithcraig, the advice that dc3 gives is sound. 

 

While ultimately, I feel that your computer can run Windows 7, the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor lets you know some things that may need attention. Such as the 2GB RAM issue, if you want to go with 64 bit. And if you do move up to 4GB RAM, part of that will be a waste if you don't install a 64 bit Windows 7. 

 

While Windows 8 handles some things differently, the Windows 7 & below OS's can only actually use 3.25GB or so of your 4GB, if it were installed. Out of that 3.25GB, some is going to be reserved for hardware, so the OS still may not get a full 3GB to work with. 

 

This is where the Upgrade Advisor can assist you & make some recommendations. 

 

Then bring those recommendations back here for us to review. We can help to make further recommendations, that will be practical for you & your needs. 

 

 

 

How do I go about in getting a Windows 7 "OEM" License?

What type of major PC retailers (in-store or online) are in your region? Most areas has some choices, though I also realise that a few doesn't have as many to choose from. Or pricing is sky high. You would simply ask the supplier, it's also called the System Builder edition by some. It's an edition of Windows generally licensed to system builders (though enthusiasts purchases to save), there is no support from Microsoft, and it can only be used on one computer. Once that computer (or the motherboard) goes out, the only way it can be re-used is to obtain the exact same motherboard, and a call to MS will be needed to re-activate. 

 

Otherwise, it can't be taken from your Lenovo & placed in a Dell down the road. 

 

It's to be installed on a bare metal HDD as you have, new or wiped clean. 

 

Please follow the advice that dc3 suggested, and report back. 

 

We'll be happy to assist where possible. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 smithcraig

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 09:58 AM

smithcraig, the advice that dc3 gives is sound. 

 

While ultimately, I feel that your computer can run Windows 7, the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor lets you know some things that may need attention. Such as the 2GB RAM issue, if you want to go with 64 bit. And if you do move up to 4GB RAM, part of that will be a waste if you don't install a 64 bit Windows 7. 

 

While Windows 8 handles some things differently, the Windows 7 & below OS's can only actually use 3.25GB or so of your 4GB, if it were installed. Out of that 3.25GB, some is going to be reserved for hardware, so the OS still may not get a full 3GB to work with. 

 

This is where the Upgrade Advisor can assist you & make some recommendations. 

 

Then bring those recommendations back here for us to review. We can help to make further recommendations, that will be practical for you & your needs. 

 

 

 

How do I go about in getting a Windows 7 "OEM" License?

 

What type of major PC retailers (in-store or online) are in your region?

 

In my region, UK, its mainly amazon, ebay and computer stores. Can I just buy a Windows 7 coa license key from amazon or ebay? Will this method work?



#8 smithcraig

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 12:04 PM

Maximum memory supported for this machine is: 2GB RAM. Would this mean that I would have to go with a 32-bit Windows 7?

#9 dc3

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 12:40 PM

That's 2GB per slot for a total of 4GB.


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#10 smithcraig

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 01:02 PM

That's 2GB per slot for a total of 4GB.


So it's best to install 4GB RAM with Windows 7 64-bit, correct? Went to car boot sale the other day and picked up this Lenovo 3000 J105 tower for only £15! How much will it be worth after I install the 4GB RAM and Windows 7? Is it worth much after all?

#11 dc3

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 01:15 PM

Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  When  FileHippo opens, click on Download latest version in the upper right pane.
 
When Speccy opens you will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
speccy9_zps2d9cdedc.png
 
Click on File which is outlined in red in the screen above, and then click on Publish Snapshot.
 
The following screen will appear, click on Yes.
 
speccy7_zpsfa02105f.png
 
The following screen will appear, click on Copy to Clipboard.
 
speccy3_zps1791b093.png
 
In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.

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#12 cat1092

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 12:13 AM


 

 

Can I just buy a Windows 7 coa license key from amazon or ebay? 

 

You can, but the chances of getting a much recycled or volume license key are high, in a short time, you'll be greeted to a black screen with a watermark in the lower right screen. When that happens, you'll pay dearly for a new key, that is, if you still want it. Secondly, it's illegal to purchase a COA or 'key' of Microsoft software, except from the MS Store or authorized retailers. The whole, intact package must be there, and depending on the license type, a hardware component may need to be included, which often will be a defective RAM stick or hard drive. 

 

The UK is a populated region, are there no major online retailers such as Newegg in the area that serves the needs of do it yourselfers & enthusiasts? Many times, these places runs Windows 7 on promo, for as little as $85, with email promo key only. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/

 

A supplier like that of above. 

 


 

 

How much will it be worth after I install the 4GB RAM and Windows 7? Is it worth much after all? 

 

That can be hard for us to determine, though a good rule of thumb is, the older a computer gets, the less it's worth (kind of like an auto). Is this going to be a computer for your personal use, or do you plan to resell it? If the latter is the case, I can advise you that no matter how much cash you pour into a older PC to either sell it, or make it run better for personal use, it's still going to be worth no more than it's market value. eBay power sellers can easily sell computers of better specs for the same or less, that what you'd put into the computer. 

 

By asking what it's worth may be, that leads me to believe your intentions may be to resell the PC. So if you do purchase a OEM license of Windows 7 & install it, then sell it, you're obligated for a period of time (local law may vary & trumps that of MS) to provide support for the Windows software installed (not the hardware). That's the real purpose of an OEM license, is to resell to a 3rd party & support. 

 

So provided you received a great deal on this computer, if your intention is to resell, why not clean it up really good, inside & out, fresh install the supplied OS if possible, or download & install a popular version of Linux, such as Ubuntu or Mint, which costs nothing, and resell it? The net profit will be about the same or better, spending a lot of money to make an item worth more doesn't always cut it. You could easily lose cash. 

 

That being stated, what are your plans for this computer? The way the Topic began, it was appearing as though it was for your personal use. In the latter case, what it's worth may not matter as much, provided it's going to be for your personal use & it runs great. 

 

Lastly, there's a flood of low cost XP & Vista devices on the market, the one I'm typing this post on cost just $29 plus shipping less than a month ago. I did upgrade the RAM by 4GB for $60, and bought a used CPU for $10, already had the upgraded HDD, optical drive & GPU as well as the OS on hand, unused, Here's the specs & WEI snapshot. It also has a Trusted Platform Module. 

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/GJVgN44f0etCtgpusi5peVC

 

CaptureWEIDetailsPostCPUUpgradeOptiplex7

 

And yet, if I wanted to resell it, it's still worth $100-125 tops (Newegg is running a $95 promo w/ Windows 7 Home Premium), even with a full version copy of Windows 7 Ultimate (original price of $319) that's legally transferable to another computer, the copy of Office 2010 Standard (also transferable) I'm going to install may increase the value by $10, and with the other 4GB set of RAM on the way to stuff it to 8GB of DDR2 (to have all PC2-6400) RAM running in dual channel mode @ 800MHz, I'd be going backwards. The market price for a computer is what it is, the one that I have is for my personal use, will be soon dual booting Linux Mint on it. I wouldn't consider market value for it, not even twice (2x) it. Because it's running good, just a humming along, has ran all day. Speccy specs doesn't show it, but it's already dual booting with Vista Business, the OS it shipped with. Oh, the link to the Newegg promo & to another for $99. No way would I take that price, even w/out including the 4GB of RAM on it's way. That Lenovo is somewhere in the same ball park as far as value, with a supported OS and that's in good condition. 

 

http://www.used-pcs.com/store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=49057&idcategory=5

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883156591&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC-_-pla-_-All+Desktop+PCs-_-N82E16883156591&gclid=CL7Wgd-Cx8ECFVNk7AodvDwAzQ

 

Those CPU's are dirt cheap, the seller was asking $14 for that Athlon 64 X2 4850e, I offered $10, and the seller took it. I would have went with an Athlon X2 6000 for $20, but the GPU + CPU power draw would be too much on the PSU. Those older AM2 CPU's, most of them, have little value today, as does the other components. DDR4 compatible CPU's & RAM has hit the market (Moore's Law has struck again), and surely new Windows 10 computers are going to be on this hardware, MS may mandate it, and that's made DDR2 worth even less (maybe how I got mine that was nice & clean, inside & out, for $29), and will push DDR devices to collectibles, most probably already were. 

 

My main point in this otherwise long post is spend the cash if you plan to keep it & the computer is in good condition, otherwise, you'll lose huge. The cost of Windows 7 & the RAM would be $120 in US dollars alone (about the value of my Optiplex 740). Many of that Lenovo series sold for less than $400 new. If it's for your personal use, then market value means little, condition of the computer does. 

 

EDIT: The Optiplex 740 in those specs also shipped to me with an erased HDD. I just used a retail copy of Vista, installed using the COA on the side of the PC & phone activated it. No issues with activation. That OS is installed on the 3rd partition, after 7 Ultimate. 

 

Best of Luck,

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 25 October 2014 - 12:29 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 cat1092

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 02:54 AM

 

 

In my region, UK, its mainly amazon, ebay and computer stores.

 

There you go, and it's the 3rd option you want if you desire to proceed, computer stores. Surely there are online ones that have Windows 7 OEM versions. One issue that may or may not impact your area, will be the availability of Windows 7 Home Premium (& maybe Ultimate) media. Come October 31, these computers aren't supposed to be distributed by mainstream merchants, though 7 Pro is excluded from that. Costco & other retailers has long prepared for this by stocking mostly Windows 7 Pro computers. 

 

This could be different in the UK, though. Like with XP users, they got a year extension that's rapidly running out. Could be the same with this issue, seems like the North American market lacks the desire to stand up to Microsoft & other corporations, plus MS is deeply involved in politics. This helps them get what they want. 

 

One example. Some brands of encrypted devices have stood for what's right & not let the government have access to encrypted devices. Well, if one has a MS Account, and the device is tied to that account, even if it's locked down, MS will hand the contents over. This makes it all the more important not to have a MS account on one's computer or device, have a regular (pre Windows 8 type account) & use one's own form of encryption. Many SSD's now has this feature, as does many backup drives. Microsoft has to know nothing. 

 

However, I don't want to get carried away with that, like I stated, it's one example. 

 

You may as well do good & make that into a Windows 7 computer for yourself. It's the best option I can see, if you spend any cash on it. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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