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First major update to Windows 10 Preview, delivered through Windows Update


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 01:20 AM

 

We've written before about Windows 10's new updating policy, and today we're seeing the real-world result for the first time. The Windows 10 Technical Preview, build 9849, is being updated to build 9860. That update will roll out automatically to members of the Windows Insider program, and it will be delivered through Windows Update.

The operating system upgrade is a little more heavyweight than a regular hotfix; systems will need to reboot to finish installation, and Microsoft says that the reboot will take longer than normal.

The major feature of the new build is that it contains the first iteration of Windows 10's notification center. At the moment, it's a simple collection of historic notifications. Microsoft says that future builds will add more capabilities to the notification center, such as the ability to take actions in response to notifications.

 

First major update to Windows 10 Preview, delivered through Windows Update

 

 

Some known problems:

Before talking about the new things, I will remind you that you are using a work in progress. As Joe said in his last post, we’re sharing things with you even though there are rough edges. This is the part of building Windows that you usually don’t get to see, since we work hard to smooth these out before it typically gets to you. There are likely many small bugs that you’ll encounter, but these are a few of the big ones that we think you should be aware of right away:

  • In some places the UI design has gone “backwards” temporarily while we’re working on the final experiences. For example in this build we know that it’s harder to join a Wi-Fi network. We’ll make changes to fix that later.
  • Another example of some UI “roughness” is sometimes Internet Explorer glyphs look garbled and items on the Start menu might disappear. Not everyone will see this, it depends on your display driver. We have a fix for this one coming soon.
  • Some machines may wake up and not go back to sleep properly.
  • Microsoft Solitaire and Mahjong games are broken in some cases and won’t launch.
  • When using 2 external monitors over Display Link, you may get a blue screen when you undock. This does not appear to be an issue when using just 1 external monitor. A fix for this one is in the works too.

http://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2014/10/21/were-rolling-out-our-first-new-build-to-the-windows-insider-program/

 

 

 

The download will range between 2GB and 2.74GB depending on CPU architecture and language.

Wow, that's like 2 or 3 complete Linux ISO's.


Edited by NickAu1, 22 October 2014 - 01:35 AM.


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#2 cat1092

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 01:54 AM

And they call this "slow" type updates? I'd not want to think what they'd be if these were on the fast track. 

 

One thing to keep in mind, that is if one has the chance, if there's installed security in the place of Windows Defender, remove it before upgrades. Otherwise, and was the case with me, it wouldn't work anymore, wouldn't repair, uninstall, nor could I enable Windows Defender until it could be fixed (I have an image, but am not going to bother). 

 

These early Technical Previews are the equivalent of Developer Previews of Windows 8 three years ago, which I knew existed, but never ran. I started on the Consumer Previews, and won't participate in the program anymore until these are available, hopefully by mid to late February. 

 

Windows has a tool called Disk2vhd, this may be a good time to install VirtualBox & test any installed Technical Previews out further, while they're still in running condition. Remember for this tool to create VirtualBox bootable VM's, the vdhx box must be unchecked, it can only use vhd files to make bootable VM's. Only certain virtual software can use the vdhx files. 

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415.aspx

 

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#3 Sirawit

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 02:25 PM

Hopefully this will fixed a lot of things. The size is very huge!

 

PS: My friend installed it on his machine and it BSOD on him in less than one day. :P

 

Thank you.


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 08:48 PM

Sirawit, the BSOD's came in less than an hour for me, and the worst part of it, there was nothing I could do. 

 

No warning to uninstall, then reinstall 3rd party security Before upgrading, or none would work. I suppose I could have 'reset' the install, but no way am I doing to self-destruct an SSD in that manner, The reset formats the drive, and I don't trust the installer (neither that of 8/8.1) to know it's environment & do the right thing. The reset option is encouraged when donating/selling a device also, so realize it's a powerful format. 

 

Participants should have been given the option do download in ISO form, or allowed to by-pass the Upgrade & create one. If this is the way that Windows 10 will ship to Windows 8/8.1 users, say if it's free, no thanks. At least I have 8.1 tamed now, and it will run until 2023. Windows 7 will run until 2020 (assuming no extension), 

 

That's all the time in the world for me to deepen my Linux knowledge, where none of this is going to happen. At least under Linux Torvalds' watch. 

 

Yes, and I mean it, thanks again.  :thumbup2:

 

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#5 badr0b0t

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:42 AM

I downloaded the update 2 nights ago and since I am running the native AV, I didn't have any issue at all.

 

And to avoid going through a lot of mess in the future, I created an ISO of the latest build by extracting Install.esd file from c:/RecoveryImage folder. This ISO can be used to install Build 9860 directly on VMs or regular hard drive. No need to start from scratch and then update again, etc.

 

Cat, if you want to install Build 9860, let me know.

 

 

ESD_decryption.jpg


Edited by badr0b0t, 23 October 2014 - 10:50 AM.

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#6 cat1092

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:24 PM

badr0b0t, I believe that I'll do as with Windows 8, just wait for the Consumer Preview to be released. Those, I had no troubles with, at least until near the end of the program, and these carried over into the final product. May have been the computer that I was testing with, as Windows 8 was getting finicky with hardware, all it took was a wireless card to throw the whole install off. Or USB card reader. 

 

It's my hope that there will be just a couple of releases for the Consumer Previews & that both will require clean install. No surprise upgrades, I had no idea that Build 9860 was coming until it was ready for install. 

 

I'll probably end up out of being curious, installing 9860 in VirtualBox, that way, no harm done to my boot order, at the moment have four OS's on the same computer & three on all of my others. That update threw everything out of whack, fortunately was able to fix. Have enough to do w/out worrying over an OS that so far, started out good, then began falling apart with the first upgrade, In a VM, there's no worries with this, at least as far as messing up bootloaders goes. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 badr0b0t

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 07:20 PM

Hopefully this will fixed a lot of things. The size is very huge!

 

PS: My friend installed it on his machine and it BSOD on him in less than one day. :P

 

Thank you.

 

The new build have some new nice features but the way it was delivered to everybody is a disaster. There may have been a lot of errors in the upgrade process and messed up a lot of things. The new build was not an upgrade but rather a replacement. Good thing I have a way to get the upgrade without really messing up everything on my PC. The Build 9860 broke a lot of stuffs that were working fine before the update. I created the 9860 ISO and did a clean install of it. Now everything is fine.


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#8 cat1092

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 11:40 PM

 

 

The new build have some new nice features but the way it was delivered to everybody is a disaster

Kind of reminds us of the Windows 8 to 8.1 Upgrade, doesn't it? 

 

There were many Topics in regards to this, and if this were a licensed version, customers would be screaming bloody murder, MS has struck twice! 

 

I'm hopeful that the licensed releases, when available, will perform better than the one we now have, and that MS has learned a major lesson as to how to install service packs. Through Windows Update & not through the reinstall of the OS. Windows 8.1 for purposes of continual support of Windows 8 after January 12, 2016, is considered a SP. It was that anyway, MS wanted to tinker with paying customers. They included new features with SP's in the past, Windows Firewall was a great example of this in action. No upgrade was needed. 

 

This next Windows release will be 'do or die' one for the corporation, as skeptical as customers are getting of MS, all it would take is another 8.1 like delivery of a Service Pack to spoil the whole show & sales will nosedive. They have to keep in mind that many of us has perfectly good running computers & that most of us doesn't need a new device. More customers are also aware of the ramifications of having a live account & it doesn't pass the smell test for many. Which is why as I covered in a previous Topic, MS & the OEM's will need to be very transparent with customers, giving us all possible install/setup options from the go, as well as train strongarming retailers such as Best Buy not to be automatically assume all users wants a Live account. 

 

Because once it's installed as such, the only way to get rid of it all is to backup contacts & emails & close the account. Otherwise, a Windows install will follow one's MS account everywhere, which will include lots of personal information, including bookmarks & other objects that one may not want all to see. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 27 October 2014 - 01:30 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 Winterland

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 06:35 AM

More customers are also aware of the ramifications of having a live account & it doesn't pass the smell test for many. Which is why as I covered in a previous Topic, MS & the OEM's will need to be very transparent with customers, giving us all possible install/setup options from the go, as well as train strongarming retailers such as Best Buy not to be automatically assume all users wants a Live account

 

Because once it's installed as such, the only way to get rid of it all is to backup contacts & emails & close the account. Otherwise, a Windows install will follow one's MS account everywhere, which will include lots of personal information, including bookmarks & other objects that one may not want all to see. 

 

Cat

 

 

Note: I added the Bold to Cat's post above.

 

This was and is the reason I got rid of the Win 10 Tech Preview I was running in my VM.

 

It looked pretty and ran fairly well (only gave it 3 GB of RAM) but the whole idea of a Live Account has been making me just a wee bit leery of this OS (as well as Win 8). I've got some concerns about this dynamic, which I've posted here and will be spending a lot of time making sure other Users know that you do not have to create a Live Account when setting up Windows 8, or in the future, Windows 10.

 

My guess is there is going to be quite a bit of "oh-no, if you don't set up a Live Account, sh*t might not work right" which really rubs me in the wrong way since it uses the Fear Factor to scare Newbies into doing something that isn't really required.

 

Arghh! 

 

OK,   *rant over*

 

Sorry about all that.


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 02:33 AM

This is just a suggestion. If one wants a Live Account for the syncing of Windows installs only, then create a whole separate Microsoft Account to keep bookmarks, apps & whatever else synced between Windows 8 & above OS's.. And then keep the one for emails to itself, it's as easy as that. Do not use the email service for anything except that for Windows installs, along with the other MS mailings. 

 

It would be an alternate solution for those who wants their computer data in order, but doesn't want their personal emails as a part of Windows (as it is with a traditionally installed Live Account). I have two MS accounts, one has never been linked to Windows in any way, shape or form & never will be. And can create a 3rd if need be, though that probably would do me little good, as the first has already been infected with 4-5 Windows installs & it would do little good & too much work to sort the OS components from the mail account to transfer contacts, etc. 

 

That one will likely be converted to a GMail account at some point, where it'll be email only, the rest won't follow. Once I see what's going to become of Windows 10, if they decide to give those who endured the pains of 8 a freebie, however I purchased a Pro OS & would expect a Pro 10 in return, not a watered down Home OS. Many doesn't realize it, but for just a little more cash, one can have it all, rather than the crumbs tossed at Home customers. No encrypting file system, no BitLocker, now no Windows Media Center (though there are software choices that's better now). WMC went downhill before the Windows 8 rollout, by taking away Free Streaming Internet TV, one of the best features of the software, then charged $10 on top of a Pro installed for the leftovers. There are open source Media Centers that's better than WMC, as well as commercial versions, such as Cyberlink's offerings. MS is charging more for less with WMC. 

 

Anyway, for those who wants the best of both worlds, but wants to keep each separate, that's an idea. 

 

Though I still feel the best solution is to set it up as Windows 7 & by time of release, it'll be like that OS, only running supercharged. That is, if there's no issues to arise with the OS that will hold back performance, however I doubt that MS will release two Vega's on a row. That's the name of a GM auto that those of us that's 50+ likely will never forget.  :P

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 Q_view

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 07:15 AM

Linux is my primary OS, Windows is used only for messing around or helping fix something with neighbors/family over the phone.  I upgraded a couple days ago, uninstalled everything that autostarted (antivirus/malware/printer even), upgrade went fine.  Only noticed a couple brief graphical glitches but no issues as of yet.  This is the first update that I could actually get done lately.  8 to 8.1 required a clean install, and 10 wouldn't upgrade from 8.1, so clean installed that too.  So at least the first major upgrade to 10 actually installed, but the way it acted it was more of a major reinstall then import the settings than an actual upgrade, but it looks like the programs I left still work.

 

One thing, I know this isn't what the consumer edition is going to do, but it would be nice with ALL updates if they would say the file size beforehand, and even handier if they kept the progress meter, %, total done, left, etc.  I live in a rural area in the US, DSL doesn't work beyond 8 miles from the village.  Everyone has capped Internet, mostly satellite, some cellular that are in range.  But with 5-10GB monthly caps very common for daytime, knowing how much every single download is, is important.  Luckily, I have a regional GSM carrier that has a 100GB cap that I am barely in range of (had to buy a few hundred $$ booster to get a good signal), so I don't have to think about it much, and am able to test this.  It's not just this testing release, it's updates for programs, new installs, etc.  It's annoying to have to actually look up some of that stuff somewhere before I can tell people they are able to download it when the filesizes aren't listed.  Also, with all big updates, it would be nice to have offline downloadable service packs etc. again, without hoops to jump through to get it done to install on more than one computer.  Just a way to click, download, save.


Edited by Q_view, 27 October 2014 - 10:35 AM.


#12 cat1092

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 12:54 AM

Q_view, my primary choice of OS is also Linux, as evidenced by my avatar, and though I have some Windows installs, it's getting close to being 3 years since last making a transaction on those OS's. Linux Mint is much more secure, plus is very responsive, a lot to do with the much less overhead used. 

 

I also agree that SP's should continue to be delivered the by tried & true method, having a CD (or DVD) for this would be a huge plus. Though I upgraded both of my Windows 8 Pro installs to 8.1 by online upgrade, it was later, on Paul Thurrott's Supersite for Windows, that I learned how to create a 8.1 ISO for upgrading multiple computers, or for repair. But this cannot be used for refresh/resets, only to upgrade or repair files. One has to have an 8.1 key for this, yet it's not the same with Windows 7, Service Pack 1. There are no differences between the two, except delivery method, and chances are, MS requires a key to prevent piracy, or to make a double sale to have a clean install of 8.1. If the latter is true (really it's the only legit way), that's plain dirty business tactics. It's been known for years that the clean install is the best method, regardless of OS brand. 

 

For all of my prior Windows releases, even 2000 Pro, which few consumers used, I have the latest SP on CD or DVD, it was beginning with Windows 7 that a DVD was needed. 

 

There is no reason why it can't go back to the known working method, and for the life of me, cannot understand the concept of performing an upgrade to install a service pack. It was a failed experiment on paying customers computers. And as rebuttal that it was needed to add new features, it's baloney. SP2 for XP delivered a powerful component of Windows that we have today in the Windows Firewall & was what really turned the wheels in motion for that OS, as prior, many businesses were still on Windows 2000 Professional & paying for a Firewall. Once it was included as part of XP SP2, sales increased dramatically, and usage of W2K began it's free fall, though it remained supported until the summer of 2010. 

 

My question to this line of thinking is why change a SP delivery method that was working fine? Future SP's to XP, Vista & Windows 7 all rolled out nicely, and with each, there were some type of performance & experience enhancements. It's my hope that MS doesn't use it's stable release customers as testers & have learned a major lesson. Customers voted with their wallets with Windows 8 & will do the same with Windows 10, once released. If it's the same old song & dance, many whom purchases new computers that will boast DDR4 compatible CPU & RAM will just find copies of Windows 7 to install, or go to Linux. 

 

As to the delivery of the first major update to the Windows Technical Preview goes, what appeared promising turned to disaster for many testers, especially those who has 3rd party security installed. What a mess, couldn't install the 3rd party, nor could enable Windows Defender. I'll cut MS some slack here, because this isn't an official Consumer Preview yet, it's the equivalent of a Developer Preview. Once the Consumer Previews are out though, I & many will expect better, for starters some notice on upgrades. First time ever that I had any OS in upgrade process & not know what was going on, until there was a prompt to reboot to install, or delay. And if this was a 'slow' release, I sure don't want to know what a fast one will be. 

 

Which is why I'm testing on VM's until at least the first Consumer Preview has passed, inside of VirtualBox on Linux Mint 17. No more messing up the bootloader for all of my OS's on Preview testing. 

 

The next release will have to be better, or the propaganda that dogged the Windows 8 Previews will resurface, part of what killed the OS launch from the go. YouTube videos of virtual machines looking like the real thing will once again be seen by millions, and as we all know, word of mouth can be the best or worst advertising a product can have. 

 

Also, the Live accounts will still be an issue, unless MS, the OEM's & retailers who sets up computers for customers are 100% transparent with their communications. This issue won't go away, no matter how good or bad the OS turns out to be, as well as service pack delivery. 

 

Looks like the engineers at MS has a lot of work on their hands in the upcoming months. They cannot afford talk to circulate that the OS is upgrading badly, even in these early previews. Of course, experience is going to vary between testers, however some of the success or not is going to depend on what software is installed. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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