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Windows 10


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5 replies to this topic

#1 cincycomputerguru

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 01:20 PM

Im going to go ahead and install windows10 on my slave drive, because I don't want to replace my current OS. Is there anything I should be aware of with windows10? I know that it's beta and there is going to be problems. Are there any found so far that might be a deal breaker?

 

My configuration:

HP Computer

Dual Core Pentium 4

4GB RAm

Installing x86 version

500GB HDD

 

Thanks guys, and I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. So nice to meet everyone.



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#2 noknojon

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 06:37 PM

Is there anything I should be aware of with windows10? I know that it's beta and there is going to be problems

Note : This was only a 6 month "Sample" when released, and not meant to replace your current system .... It is not like moving from Vista to a retail version of Windows 8.

Do not expect it to be a final, free, download of Windows 10, as it may even be renamed when it ever is released or re- engineered.

 

Your specs are just about minimum to install this sample test version.

 

The Main Item - It is NOT a BETA version, but just a "Test Sample" of what the next version MAY be like ........



#3 badr0b0t

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 07:12 PM

Im going to go ahead and install windows10 on my slave drive, because I don't want to replace my current OS. Is there anything I should be aware of with windows10? I know that it's beta and there is going to be problems. Are there any found so far that might be a deal breaker?

 

My configuration:

HP Computer

Dual Core Pentium 4

4GB RAm

Installing x86 version

500GB HDD

 

Thanks guys, and I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. So nice to meet everyone.

 

 

1. You just need the 32-bit installer.

2. Make sure your "slave drive" does not contain any data that's important to you.

3.. Pull-out your main drive before installing WIn 10. Your main OS may not boot up after installing Win 10. Although it's an easy fix but if you don't know anything about fixing boot problems, just pull out the main drive.

 

As long as you installed Win 10 SEPARATELY, you should not worry about anything.

 

Enjoy!


Edited by badr0b0t, 25 October 2014 - 07:32 PM.

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#4 cat1092

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 02:50 AM

 

 

As long as you installed Win 10 SEPARATELY, you should not worry about anything.

As I learned the hard way, this is sound advice & should be done in this manner. 

 

What you don't want to happen, is for this thing to self update & mess up your main bootloader, and it will do so, by surprise. The upgrade won't be seen until it's ready to install. So it will be best when this happens is perform a forced shutdown, rather than reboot, if not, your original bootloader is toast.

 

Once shutdown, disconnect the main drive, fire the computer back up and allow the update to complete.....alone. I don't know how fast MS is rolling out updates, but mine was set to 'slow', wouldn't have wanted to know what it'd have done if it was a 'fast' release. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 wNieds

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 09:50 AM

Maybe you should think about installing it on a virtul machine, as that would not take up a lot of hard drive space (maybe 25GB)

Here's a link to a decent virtual machine software: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/virtualbox/downloads/index.html


Edited by wNieds, 01 November 2014 - 09:51 AM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 02:36 AM

wNieds,  :welcome: to BC Forums! 

 

Yes, VirtualBox is indeed great VM software, is what I use & recommend to others. Even for those with 8.1 Pro where Hyper-V machines can be setup, this may still be a better option, as Hyper-V can be buggy on home desktop or notebook installs. The worst part being some type of funky playing around with my CPU, rather than a dual core, 4 thread CPU, in the Windows Task Manager with Hyper-V enabled, it was showing as one core with 2 threads, on both the 8.1 Pro install, as well as the 7 Pro install in the same drive. 

 

While on the other drive, Linux Mint (version 16 at the time) & Vista on the other drive were reporting the CPU as should, two cores & 4 threads. 

 

It's also obvious that Microsoft doesn't aim their VM solution to home users, otherwise there would be a far more friendly interface, as well as some helpful hints for the home/student user. Normally when a Web page of Hyper-V exists, Windows Server 2012 is the OS being spoken of. They act as though their 8.1 base doesn't exist & always has. I also get lots of MS Springboard email, and again, when Hyper-V is mentioned, so is Windows Server 2012. The only time that MS boasted about Hyper-V capabilities on Windows, was during the Windows 8 Pro promo launch, when they were trying to sell the OS's for $40. 

 

Windows Virtual PC w/XP Mode was the best that MS offered home/student & enthusiast users for VM software, however now XP is unsupported & at best, this software supports 32 bit VM's. Not sure if it'll run the Windows Technical Preview or not, haven't heard anyone say. At any rate, it's not as robust & much less control.

 

VMWare Player used to be good, but haven't used it since before the Windows 8 Previews came along, that's been sometime back & don't know how the product stacks up today. One way to get it w/out filling out a registration form, is by getting it from the File Hippo site. One of the few software selections left that still supports install on Windows 2000 (click onto the Technical tab for details). 

 

http://filehippo.com/download_vmware_player/

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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