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Oem Version Of Office


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8 replies to this topic

#1 I_am_CanadianEh?

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 01:38 PM

Hi,
I'm hoping I can get some feedback on this:

- I bought a new computer and needed to put Office 2003 onto the system. Retail prices are expensive so I tried a search online. I ended up finding a site that sells the OEM version of the software which is much cheaper than retail.

After reading up a bit on many sites saying OEM software can ONLY be sold with a computer piece of hardware I am now very worried that I did not buy a genuine version.

I bought Office 2003 Professional OEM version which comes with the CD and COA, so I guess it is legit? I ordered it a few days ago and should get it in the mail this week.

The online store has a section saying that they only sell authentic software. They DO have a mailing address in CA.

Do you think I have a non-genuine version? If so, what can I do....they will not take back opened copies of OEM. There are many of these companies online.

Help, I'm very smart and careful with these things, but I have a feeling I got duped. :thumbsup:

Thx.

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#2 jgweed

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 02:48 PM

You can check the firm out on ResellerRatings which provides costomer feedback and comments.
Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#3 I_am_CanadianEh?

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 11:24 AM

Well....
After checking out the site, this online reseller got 2 out of 10. :thumbsup:

Most of the complaints were in regards to no one available at customer service and materials often received in poor condition.

I guess I'll have to wait and pray :flowers:

But, if anything good comes out of this - please check out http://www.resellerratings.com
It is an excellent resource to finding legitimate sources for all your computing needs. Just go to "Store ratings" and enter the info in the appropriate field.

Thanks, John for the info. :trumpet:

#4 jgweed

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 04:30 PM

Push comes to shove, you can easily download and install OpenOffice.org, a free open source office suite almost totally compatible with MS Office. Good luck.
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#5 Andrew

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 07:01 AM

Or, if you're daring, you can download the beta version of Office 2007 for free from Microsoft. I've been using it, and it's pretty OK. No crashes or anything. But it's kind of a big download (440MB) especially over a dial-up :thumbsup:

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 18 June 2006 - 07:02 AM.


#6 I_am_CanadianEh?

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 09:03 AM

I got the CD from the online supplier. I inspected it....it appeared authentic. I then called Microsoft and they verifyied that it was authentic by the product Key. :thumbsup:

So, I dodged a big bullet here. :flowers:

My advice to everyone is if you're shopping online for software, you get what you pay for. You can pay top retail price at a reputable store and get excellent service (you walk home with the product) and a genuine product or you can pay a cheap price but no guarantees you'll get the real thing or the best support.

If you wish to purchase software online from a reseller, here's a couple very good and reputable resellers which only offer genuine software.

http://www.viosoftware.com
http://www.newegg.com

Good luck and happy surfing! :trumpet:

#7 Im2smug

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 04:08 PM

What you have purchased is referred to as grey market software -- the person who sold it to you is in violation of the law. Technically the version you have is illegal.
Full Package Product purchased at retail establishments, though more expensive initially, gives you certain rights like the ability to transfer the license from one box to another.

OEM software is to be sold installed on a new box and dies with that box. OEM software that is sold on the open market is illegal and is not authorized for service packs, patches and upgrades.

I am a Microsoft Certified OEM System Builder and as such I can purchase OEM software. I can not ever sell the software separate from a box.

It is unfortunate that some companies violate their agreements with microsoft and sell OEM software this way. The consumer will get an inferior product that cant be patched or upgraded and will badmouth Microsoft, but never badmouth the idiot that sold them the procuct and wont even badmouth themselves for buying an inferior product.

'nuff said

#8 I_am_CanadianEh?

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 08:59 AM

Im2smug,
You are correct in what you say.

After I purchased an OEM version I felt a little guilty, but I was lucky that the install worked fine. I'm a little wiser today, after reading up on the MS website. :thumbsup:

However, I couple things that you mention did not actually occur.

1) After installing Office and the SP2 disc that came with it, I was able to activate & register the product. Then Windows Update notified me of 8 patches for Office. I downloaded the ActiveX, it checked for an authentic version and the patches installed no problem. So technically, I may have received this product "illegally", but it is 100% genuine. If I gave this exact CD pak to DELL and they installed it on a system and sold the system to me, it would have been legal. But the end result and performance of the product would have been exactly the same.

2) I did some research on the Microsoft website for legitimite re-sellers. I looked at one of the sellers' website and they were selling OEM software on the open market. Some of them were using a "loophole" by including a non-periferal piece of hardware with the OEM CD rather than a full system. And these are re-sellers that were on the "approved list" from Microsoft. :flowers:

An OEM CD does not know whether a system builder at DELL or Joe Average in Apt. 415 is installing an OEM version in their computer (at least I don't think so). So if Microsoft wants to stop you & I from buying OEM software as a stand-alone, maybe they should put some code on their CD's to only allow a system builder to install it. How, I don't know....but MS is a multi-billion $$ company, I'm sure they can figure it out.

I won't buy OEM software again. As I said before, I agree, it is illegal and the risks can be too great. I was lucky this time. However, MS Office is way overpriced on the Retail market and no retailer wants to dare undercut anyone even by $20. So, it's tough finding a really good deal on current retail software prices, even online. If anyone knows of a legitimate site, please let me know.

Finally, here's a very interesting article regarding the "first sales doctrate". Now, it's an old article but it basically talks about a court judge ruling that "if you never install the software, you can sell it legally regardless of what the EULA states, and I assume this involes OEM software as well.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/5628

I'm not sure if this ruling still holds as of this day.

I don't want to create an endless thread of back-and-forth debate over legal stuff, but just to show you that Im2smug is exactly right.....selling OEM software as a standalone product is grey market software

Cheers. :trumpet:

#9 Im2smug

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 01:46 AM

A piece of software, which is intellectual property and not technically a tangible good has a lot of history on its side in the legal system, and I am sure if you wanted to test out your legalese you could, considering all due costs lets say.

Microsoft is actively trying to get illegitimate software from being able to get downloads, and, eventually it catches up to some people who were ďauthenticĒ one day and not the next.

Software does indeed know whether a system builder at DELL or Joe Average in Apt. 415 is installing an OEM version in their computer and each copy that I install along with its unique PIDS and all others identifiers are branded by me and tweaked to work on my hardware, same as Dell. When you build your own box, I am sure there are things that just donít interact correctly with the system. Things you as a lay person would never be aware of and would blame on either the software mfg or the hardware mfg. When we build our packages they are subject to a battery of tests to ensure they work with the hardware as it leaves the factory. If the packaged image is not quite correct, we can inject software into the image before we flash it and seal it. Microsoft sells software, not boxes, but the calls that come in to the help desk are mostly people that say, yeah, your software doesnít work, because it keeps crashing when I install it on this box, or when I install this hardware or whatever. Microsoft has us OEMís and Dell stamp our names and telephone numbers on boxes for this reason, and also, we mark the software, so the client can call us and not Microsoft. A dell box, formatted by an end user, with say the video card and NIC swapped out and installed with an end users hardware and his own version of non Dell branded Windows software is no longer as it left the factory. It is a bastardized version which no longer should be called a Dell and should not warrant support nor any calls for help. People do this very often and it gives Microsoft a bad name and Dell a bad name or whomever the original OEM is.

What you have is genuine OEM software which is not identical to FPP product which you would get at a Staples or CompUSA or wherever retail product is sold. OEM software goes through a secondary process on our end and sometimes a tertiary process as well. As far as "loopholes" go, that is intended more for volume licensing schemas for all practical purposes, and again, OEM's that skirt the OEM licensing will eventually be charged and prosecuted. Computer records will be siezed and your anonymity will be blown

As far as price goes, people all over complain that Microsoft software is too expensiveóCOMPARED TO WHAT? Microsoft has fair market prices compared to the other choices on the market considering what you are getting, as well as an excellent level of documentation and support. Microsoft provides a standard of five years of support for the software they sell. I challenge you to find anything else that serves a function such as this and offers five years of support. As far as prices go, its not a matter of undercutting prices, software in general has profit margins that are razor thin, so you donít make money selling software or even hardware for that matter. I would suggest a course in business management concentrating on profit margins and product development with a dose of sales thrown in for those of you who think things should be free or next to nothing. The other whine is that Microsoft is the only game in town or that they are a bully. For every client that I have had since 1991 that asked for software other than Microsoft, they have gotten an alternative. Itís a matter of asking. There have always been alternatives. If you donít like what you are buying, or stealing in your case, then shut up and go buy something else.

nuff said

I dont want to get into a pissing contest over this. If I were you I would turn in your copy and get a legitimate copy if you still can

Pirates, Get Yer Legit Copy of XP Pro Here

Microsoft alerted me last night that it is modifying its Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program, which seeks to prevent software piracy by requiring that users validate their Windows copy online when seeking non-security updates from the Microsoft.com Web site. According to a representative of the company, Microsoft will now offer US customers who unwittingly purchased an illegitimate copy of Windows XP Professional a legitimate version of the OS.


As with any deal with the devil, the WGA XP offer comes with some strings attached. For starters, users wishing to obtain a legitimate copy of XP Pro are asked to first seek a remedy from the company that sold them the bogus version.

When that fails, Microsoft requires a proof of purchase, the counterfeit XP CD-ROM, and a detailed accounting of the purchase which includes information about the parties who sold them the software. Customers can also opt to obtain an electronic key for $150 that transforms their bogus XP copy into a legitimate copy. The qualifications for this version are less strict: Users only need to provide a detailed report and then pass an electronic scan that ensures their Windows version hasn't been tampered with in any way. I was unable to discern whether anyone's first born son would be required as well.

The XP replacement program will run through June 30, according to the company. For those of us stuck with unwittingly pirated versions of XP, it's a deal you simply can't refuse.




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