Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

PC won't power on. Pressing power button does nothing.


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 signofzeta

signofzeta

  • Members
  • 420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:32 AM

Posted 08 October 2014 - 02:05 AM

I have this 8 year old desktop PC that worked 12 days ago.  I powered off the PC for 12 days, and within 3 of those 12 days, the house was at 13 degrees Celsius or 56 degrees Fahrenheit, so it is pretty cold.  I turned the heat on yesterday, and it is now at 73 degrees Fahrenheit.  I tried to turn it on today, and nothing happens.

 

The PC is plugged into a surge protector, which is connected to the wall socket.

 

I tested a few things.

 

I moved the PC plug to another socket in the surge protector, and the PC won't power on.  I know it isn't the wall socket's fault, or the surge protector's fault because I have the monitor, printer, modem, and router plugged into the same surge protector, and those devices are working fine.

 

Now to test the cord.  I know the cord works because when I unplug the PC, the green light near the power supply unit turns off.  When I plug the PC back in, the green light turns back on.  If the power supply unit is faulty, does the green light on the back of desktop PC's emit a solid green light?  Mine is solid green when the PC is plugged in.

 

I am not a PC hardware kind of guy, so I don't want to mess things up by opening the case.  I want to know a few things as to what could be causing this problem.  I know that the cold has caused the PC to not be able to power on.  I always power on this PC for 24 hours, leave it off for 12 days, then power on for 24 hours again, just so that I don't wear down the parts by leaving it on, and that the parts don't get all cold by powering on the PC every now and then, but apparently, the PC has been cold for a few days, and now the PC won't power on.

 

I want to know what could cause the PC to outright not power on?  Power supply unit?  Motherboard?  Hard drive?  Something else?

 

If the cold has to do with anything, what does cold weather affect the most to cause the PC to not be able to power on?  Power supply unit?  Motherboard?  Hard Drive?  Something else?

 

How do I extend the life of this PC?  How often should I leave this PC on, and how often should I turn it off?  As I said, I turn it on for 24 hours, then leave it off for 12 days, and turn it back on for 24 hours, then leave it off for 12 days.


Edited by signofzeta, 08 October 2014 - 02:10 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 bludshot

bludshot

  • Members
  • 657 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 08 October 2014 - 11:13 PM

Some guesses:

 

- condensation from when things were cold and then got warm again could cause moisture in the computer and then short it out or damage it.

 

- supposedly parts can wiggle loose over time from the computer being on (warm) and off (cold) as the metal is expanding and contracting etc.

 

- power supplies get old and die sometimes

 

 

A PC not powering on suggests a dead power supply (which could still put a green light on the motherboard as I understand it), or a dead motherboard. For example if there was a lightning storm during the 12 days it was off.

I would first re-seat all of the things in the computer (make sure everything it plugged in and stuck in properly). Then I would want to test the power supply. I use this this Ultra power supply tester but  without one of those all you can do is either try a new power supply or try your power supply in another computer (I guess).

 

I don't think there is anything you can do to make a computer last longer than your 12 day off 1 day on routine. Leaving it on all the time would remove the issue of having it left stagnant (which you could think it might "seize up" or whatever) but add the wear and tear of it running all the time - plus, I guess I am super paranoid but I don't like to leave a computer on unattended for a long time since I'm scared of fires...



#3 gavinseabrook

gavinseabrook

  • Members
  • 773 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:El Paso
  • Local time:02:32 AM

Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:33 AM

One thing you can try is unplug power completely to the power supply, press and hold your power button for 15-30 seconds, then plug the power supply back in and see if it turns on. Sometimes fully draining the power on the supply can help give it a fresh start, but it is a very old PC and most stock power supplies are only rated for 5-6 years. May just need a new one, but the good news is, it is probably a low power one which you can usually get one in the store for $20-$60...if you want to keep this old machine alive.


Gavin Seabrook

 


#4 signofzeta

signofzeta
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:32 AM

Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:57 PM

Ok I got the worst case scenario here.  A couple of capacitors on the motherboard was bulging out at the top.

 

Does this mean this PC can't be resurrected?

 

Due to some games I play that only run well on XP, I would like to keep at least one windows XP machine.  Considering the bulging capacitors, is the only fix to buy a new computer, or in my case, a used refurbished XP machine?

 

Power Supply is good, as it isn't too loud, and the green light in the back is solid.  When I turn it on, when it used to work, it sounds like as if nothing is wrong.  I don't really know how to explain it, but it sounds like as if you turned on a brand new PC, although at some times in the past, the PC when I turned it on was immediately loud, but not all the time.

 

The hard drive is OK, well according to SMART diagnostics.

 

I think everything else works except for a few capacitors.  I can't believe that a few blown capacitors can render the entire PC inoperable.  If you have a failed hard drive, replace it.  If you have a failed power supply, replace it.  Failed motherboard?  PC is done, and the fact that the OS is tied to the motherboard.  Can't even extract the data from the hard drive, because no other motherboard will boot up the OS.

 

The worst is when the PC seems to be working fine one day, and the next day, it dies on you.  It's like there is no warning signs.

 

I have an older PC and all capacitors are fine.  I guess build quality is much lower for newer PC's.  I expected PC's to last 20 years, but this isn;t the case, not counting the fact that hardware and software become obsolete.  At least with this older PC, I don't use it as much because the fans are loud, and at least there is warning signs that the PC is getting old.  This one that died on me?  No warning signs.

 

Well it would be cool if someone here could tell me if I could resurrect that PC with the bulging capacitors.  I don't even know if the capacitors are replaceable, or if someone has ever done it before.


Edited by signofzeta, 09 October 2014 - 03:06 PM.


#5 bludshot

bludshot

  • Members
  • 657 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 11 October 2014 - 12:56 AM

Ok I got the worst case scenario here.  A couple of capacitors on the motherboard was bulging out at the top.

 

Does this mean this PC can't be resurrected?

 

Due to some games I play that only run well on XP, I would like to keep at least one windows XP machine.  Considering the bulging capacitors, is the only fix to buy a new computer, or in my case, a used refurbished XP machine?

 

Yeah I think you actually can replace capacitors, but you need some skill with that (skills I don't have. I've watched videos of how it's done, and I would surely destroy the first few things I tried to solder). I forget what I was watching, maybe extreme laptop repair or something, But, basically they use a soldering iron to melt the bit where the capacitor goes in, pull the busted one out, and stick the replacement in with some extra melted solder stuff. They made it look real easy, and the replacement parts cost like a dime or something lol.

 

I'm not sure, but I think it's possible that the bulging capacitors could be a red herring. Maybe that's not why the PC isn't working, and those things would still work?? (I guess it's likely they are the problem though - dead motherboard was one of my first guesses.)

 

You could just buy a replacement motherboard - if you can find one used or something.

 

Power Supply is good, as it isn't too loud, and the green light in the back is solid.  When I turn it on, when it used to work, it sounds like as if nothing is wrong.  I don't really know how to explain it, but it sounds like as if you turned on a brand new PC, although at some times in the past, the PC when I turned it on was immediately loud, but not all the time.

 

While the power supply might be good, I don't think you can assume it is just based on it not being loud and having a green light on it. I had a bad power supply last year that was exactly like that, yet it was no longer giving full power to the motherboard.

 

 

I think everything else works except for a few capacitors.  I can't believe that a few blown capacitors can render the entire PC inoperable.  If you have a failed hard drive, replace it.  If you have a failed power supply, replace it.  Failed motherboard?  PC is done, and the fact that the OS is tied to the motherboard.

 

XP is old now, and support for it has ended. I assume the games are offline games. Retail windows is not tied to the motherboard, so you should look into that.

 

 

Can't even extract the data from the hard drive, because no other motherboard will boot up the OS.

 

Huh? You can plug the hard drive into any system and it will be able to extract data. Also, other motherboards *will* boot up the OS, and windows will even be somewhat useable for a while, it will just complain that you need to re-activate it. When it comes to just copying data, you don't need to boot to the drive though.

 

Also, as far as having an XP gaming machine, you don't actually need a whole dedicated computer just for XP. You can dual boot, or even do the lame-o version of it that I do (with no extra work to set up, or mess up, dual booting), which is I just change which drive I boot to in the bios.



#6 Ezzah

Ezzah

  • Members
  • 438 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:07:32 PM

Posted 11 October 2014 - 02:49 AM

Blown capacitors is a bad sign of a bad motherboard, and from the information given, and it would be strongly related to the age of your computer. (Eight years old is pretty old). 

 

Blown capacitors will definitely prevent your motherboard from working. A motherboard is complex circuitry, and generally breaking the circuit renders it inoperable (despite some built-in safes to the designs now). It would be more beneficial to replace your whole system (motherboard, CPU, PSU), but keep your HDD, since you want to maintain XP.


mYIGVc5.png


#7 signofzeta

signofzeta
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:32 AM

Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:10 AM

I have windows XP preinstalled on that machine, so I can't really move the hard drive to a brand new motherboard, unless it is that exact same style of motherboard.  I also can't find any copies of windows XP online either.


Edited by signofzeta, 11 October 2014 - 11:16 AM.


#8 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 21,650 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:29 AM

If XP came preinstalled on the computer, then you would have to activate it again and  Microsoft has said they will do it. If you called and explained the problem over the phone, saying your MB went bad and needed a new activation, they would do it for you even if the computer or XP was OEM. If you can find an exact copy of the motherboard from an OEM if it was something like a Dell or HP I don't believe you would need to activate it again. When activating by phone, you need to get a hold of a real person and talk to them. The automatic activation by phone would not work.

 

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_xp-windows_install/cant-activate-windows-xp-after-motherboard-change/02591067-78a9-435e-ab32-72c4e1e8c4ed

 

This is a pretty good site on bad capacitors. It gives a good explanation and there are videos as bludshot mentioned.



#9 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 21,650 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:33 AM

Edit: Not sure why the double post.

 

Try this phone number and see if you can get in touch with a live person and explain the problem.

 

Win (888) 571-2048


Edited by JohnC_21, 11 October 2014 - 11:34 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users