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I wonder what will be the minimum requirements to run it .


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#1 herbman

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 11:27 AM

I have a Sandy bridge  Intel i5 processor with plenty of ram ,  just wondering if upgrading from Win 7 SP1 64 bit to Win 8.1 or Win 10 is worthwhile.



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#2 rockysosua

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 11:38 AM

You have ample power to do so.

I find that some of the processors that are below the Intel i3 processors, can have a bit of difficulty, in that they might hesitate here and there, but an i5 is the bomb and it can run just about anything.

 

Officially speaking, MSC says that these are the minimum requirements for 8.

  • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with support for PAE, NX, and SSE2 (more info)

  • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) (32-bit) or 2 GB (64-bit)

  • Hard disk space: 16 GB (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver

Those specs are ridiculously low, as 20 gigs of hard drive is way too little for even the most bare naked standard installations, once you start using it, and 1 gig of ram is just as bad. It'll run on 2, buit it'll run a lot better with 4 gigs.

As for the processor, you can look for any CPU that scores over 2,000 on the Passmark CPU page, and you'll have ample power to handle any Windows system.


Edited by rockysosua, 06 October 2014 - 11:40 AM.

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#3 herbman

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 11:55 AM

Thanks for the info , i have a feeling that most will skip Win 8 and opt for 10 when they do decide on a new computer or to upgrade from 7.   I also think since 7 will get security updates for a few years to come many may stick with it. 


Edited by herbman, 06 October 2014 - 11:56 AM.


#4 rockysosua

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 12:04 PM

I don't know what the general public will do, but as it stands right now, 8.1 is the best system I have ever used.

The tiny changes that we've seen in the Win 10 Preview, are minimal and not that appealing to me.

If nothing radical changes, it looks like running 10 or 8.1, will amount to the same.

Of course, MSC has ample time to make a zillion changes to 10 before releasing it.


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#5 KRAZY KEV

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 03:58 PM

My computer is around 5 or 6 year old.  I'm using the 32 bit version of W10

MOTHERBOARD = ASROCK P43D 1600 TWINS 1394

CPU = Core 2 Duo E8400

RAM = 2GB

HDD = A total of seven drives ranging from 320gb to 2tb (all over four years old)

VIDEO = ATI HD3450 256mb

SOUND = ASUS XONAR D2X (No driver available as yet & Windows 8:1 driver wont work)



#6 rockysosua

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 04:17 PM

That E8400 is a nice processor, near identical in power to my laptop's i3.

That system would have no problems running, 8, 8.1 or 10 Preview,

 

Intel Core2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz       Scores  2166

 

Intel Core i3-3217U @ 1.80GHz      Scores 2297

 

PS: Adding 2 more gigs of ram wouldn't hurt.


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 10:29 PM

The Windows Technical Preview will run on much less CPU than the E8400 (score well below 1000), though I've since removed it from the computer (Dell Optiplex Enhanced 740 DT), here's a couple of snapshots of it while there. 

 

CapturePNGTaskManagerOptiplex840.png

 

CapturePNGTaskManagerUnderLoad2.png

 

 CapturePNGTaskManagerwithLoad.png

 

CapturePNGOptiplexInformation.png

 

Here's the GPU I added, which helped greatly, was the one included with my XPS 8700. AMD would only download 8.1 drivers, probably has no Windows 10 ones yet, but MS had a lesser version of the CCC installed. 

 

CapturePNGGPU-ZAMDRadeon7570Optiplex840.

 

Since then, the RAM & CPU was upgraded & Windows 7 Ultimate is running on it nicely. Not bad, considering what I have in the PC (initial cost of less than $50 shipped). 

 

CaptureWEIOptiplex740.png

 

CaptureOptiplex740Windows7Ultimate.png

 

It would have been great for MS to have kept the WEI in place, and have left my opinion on this & other issues. That WEI is a key score & great for the economy too. Think about it, all of the cash spent chasing that perfect 7.9 score. MS raised this number with Windows 8 to a max of 9.9 & there's a cmd option of how to run it on 8.1. Several sites has posted instructions, so I'll include one. If interested, a Google search may prove invaluable, and who knows, this may work with the Preview. 

 

http://www.myfavoritegadgets.info/tipstricks/WEIwin81.html

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 darth lord

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 08:56 AM

hi everyone,

 

thats my experience:

 

i ve upgraded from win8.1 pro to win10 tp 64bit enterprise

 

running on a new basic laptotp (200$) with intel atom n2820 @2ghz and 2gb ram. works really fine! also with 8.1 i had no problem and mailing, video, internet are pretty good. the system turn on/off quickly and for basic operations its really good.

 

im sure that an i5 runs win8/10 without problems



#9 cat1092

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 10:42 PM

darth lord,  :welcome: to BC Forums!

 

 

 

im sure that an i5 runs win8/10 without problems

 

That's the next computer that I'm going to install it on, an MSI i5 powered notebook. It's handled everything else, so the Windows Technical Preview should coast on it. 

 

If it'll run on that AMD Athlon 4050e posted above with 2GB RAM, which has since been replaced by a 4450e that was on hand & 4GB of added RAM, it should run on anything. Though I just found a 4850e for the PC for $10, I'm tempted to try a 3250e, one of the smallest of that series of CPU's, using half the wattage (22W), just for kicks. It was leftover from an HP PC I once had. 

 

My only issue with being able to run on most any CPU, as long as meets the specs (the NX security feature), is that this will give CPU OEM's reason to downgrade, rather than upgrade, their CPU's. It was looking as recent as 2012 that 4.0GHz CPU's would be mainstream, but, another of Windows 8 accomplishments, that was shot out of the sky, as it was lite on resources also. So 4.0+GHz CPU's will be mainly for enthusiasts & not for the masses. 

 

On many notebooks, there are no true quad core i7's, and some runs under the 2.0GHz mark (in standard mode, Turbo can be activated), most all i5's are also under 2.0GHz, and again, this shows a reverse in progress for CPU power, guess I better be glad that my i5 was from 2011, a 480M & runs at 2.66GHz with a Turbo boost of 2.9GHz. Even my i3 powered Toshiba of 2010 origin runs at 2.4GHz, but am getting ready to find & drop in the same i5 that's in the MSI, while they're available. 

 

Many says the downgrading is for battery life. May very well be true, but did anyone think of the possibility of having two batteries? Back in 2007, my Dell Latitude had an extra battery, simply through an optical bay adapter, that doubled my runtime. As for the optical drive, and those of today, there are $5 USB cables that will power these perfectly fine, as all three of the notebooks that I currently have has an SSD+HDD combo, due to these $12 adapter bays. The OEM's could have taken that route, and this was an optional configuration on some of years back. 

 

My suspicion is that many of these under powered computers that are running Windows 7 will be great candidates for Windows 10 upgrades, once released, if MS will allow for a clean install, as with Windows 8 Pro in 2012. However, I'll not give up my Windows 7 installs, will give up a Dell OEM Windows 8 OS, but the 8.1 ones are of the Pro version, these will only be replaced if Pro is offered as an upgrade with Media Center option, of which I have. I'm not downgrading from a Pro to Home type OS, these are watered down versions of Windows. Pro became popular with XP, having several features that the Home version didn't, and these options has increased since. 

 

Once released, Windows 10 should have no issues with running on your hardware. Adding an SSD that's low in cost today (many under $100) will make it run like a new one that has another 1GHz in CPU power. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 muzramp

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 11:07 AM

The requirements between 7/8/8.1 have all been pretty much the same. There was not a huge gap like xp-vista.



#11 HatchiNZ

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 05:36 PM

Not sure about others,but I went from 32bit Windows 7 Ultimate to Win10, on this Toshiba A660 with Intel Core i7, 3Gb.. 

 

Likey,likey so far... there have been a couple of niggles, but nothing I can't get around ;-)



#12 cat1092

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 10:40 PM

HatchiNZ, as our first encounter, please allow me to extend you a late    :welcome:      to BC Forums!

 

And yes, your leap and further can be achieved & beyond, as one of my PC's were designed for Vista, as you see above, it began with a low spec one, that's been upgraded some since. However, the fact is, and will be, that as each version passes, it's run smoother, and quite possibly on lower spec computers. Though we're in the midst of historical moment, not just with Windows, but even more, a brand new generation of computer hardware is already here in limited amounts for enthusiasts.....but when Windows 10 is released to retailers, a new Windows OS on new-gen hardware will be here. 

 

Which between the blend, should make Windows 10 to be a interesting, if not very successful & powerful release, one to top all prior in history. For the record, the final version of Windows 10, while will be available for licensing on current devices, and that's perfectly fine....not everyone can afford the keys to a new computer, and many will have them, literally, in one form or another. Newer devices, especially portables of all types, will be loaded with Anti-Theft Technology, an optional feature with select Intel computers of today, and AMD APU's that has an A-6 through A-10 has several capabilities built in (sorry, A-4's are left behind), there's a page on the AMD site to explore these options. 

 

Your Intel Core i7 will carry you a long way, though between now & the final release, if you desire to take full advantage of your hardware, an upgrade to 8GB or so (today's "sweet spot"), you should be able to run 64 bit Windows 10 quite well. If that's what you want in the end. 

 

One difference that began with Windows 8 in early 2012 for those who participated in the first Consumer Preview of two, was that during the Setup phase of the computer (this can be applied to a new, out of the box Windows 8, 8.1 & 10, when released), for maximum privacy, it's best not to be connected to the Internet. That way it'll setup like a Windows 7 that's supercharged, especially the final version of Windows 10, which will have everything right there in the Windows Start Menu, back by demand of the customers. 

 

We voted with our wallets, and though on many levels Windows 8 was a success, the one that counted the most, sales, is where it hurt the most. In large part, because there was no familiar Start Menu, and in many of the packages, there were no detailed explanations of how to run the OS. Maybe 10 more releases from now, customers may be willing to flip between screens, but not those of 2012 (nor in 2015), many whom are retired pre-Boomers, and never had a computer until they retired, to pay the bills (most still shopped at B&M stores). A wave of low cost XP devices made this possible, though many were desktop PC's, in the early 2000's, notebooks were still a costly item. 10 years later, it's now a wave of mid to later Boomers dominating the market, and we don't care about the junk that came with Windows 8 either. Microsoft and the OEM's could have better prepared the customers, through TV ads and mailings, from device registrations, but chose not to, a setup for long lines for returns of Windows 8 computers the days after Christmas. Devices are supposed to be easy to use out of the box, w/out taking a week to learn how to use them, or enough to get by. 

 

Though I also realize there's another group, many of whom are Millennials, who will be the largest towards the tablets & other ultra portables, along with some late Boomers, who will need these devices for school, employment, doing many of the other things that we all do on computers & on the go socializing. This first group may not be the largest target in numbers today (in later years will be), but if a 20 to 30% of long term Windows 7 consumers makes the leap, that just may be enough to declare Windows 10 a success, even if usage doesn't immediately, or ever break Windows 7 customer share. At this point, I'd call 35 to 40% of the Windows usershare of version 10 a success to propel future releases, and to prevent another purge of MS's headquarters. No one wants that, and if it weren't for the one person who has his idea of the "perfect" Windows 8 for everyone, with no input from Preview testers, that OS may had been more embraced & many careers would have been spared. 

 

In regards to Service Packs, what in technical terms Windows 8.1 is, as support will drop for those with Windows 8 come January 12, 2016, MS will need to go back to delivering these as in prior releases, to avoid the end result. Which was an upgrade install & many components, in particular, wireless cards, would no longer work. In the end, many consumers were stuck with USB wireless, which at best is buggy, these generates a lot of heat, and the hotter these gets, the more flaky the connection. Did I mention that BT was totally knocked out as a result of this type of wireless connection? It has been proven time & time again, that upgrade installs aren't the best way to install an OS. Bare metal installs are best, and MS could have done better, but chose not to. It's their product, yet they tried to throw it off on the OEM's. 90 days of support isn't enough. The warranty was one year (for upgrade licenses that could be cleanly installed), and for many, 8.1 fell in this time frame. 

 

However, for Windows 10 to succeed, more than a rejuvenated Start Menu & hardware will be needed, there will need to be more transparency between MS, the OEM's, and the end users of these devices. For starters, those who plan to upgrade, all options needs to be laid on the table, and not three hours before release via 3rd party journalists. Customers needs to know how to install Windows to suit our needs, not those of MS. This means not having a "live" account, rather a supercharged Windows 7 one. Many will cling to Windows 7 to the end because of this alone, and many will have Recovery Media to go back, if desired, The same will apply to those who purchases new computers, MS will need to step in and have reality talks with retailers such as Best Buy, about their tactics, who normally too eagerly offers to setup the OS for the customer, in too big of a hurry, the end result not being what's wanted, but what the less than optimal skilled store associate wanted customers to have. 

 

In other words, the kickoff will have to be a success on all ends, as was proven with Windows 8, word of mouth advertising can be the very best (or worst) advertising a business can have. Hopefully MS has learned some other things, other than the non-Start Menu of Windows 8, that will better enable them to launch a successful product in what will be Windows 10. There also needs to be more Pro devices in all retail centers. Why pay another $100 to upgrade a watered down OS. It's been known at least since XP, that the Home version was a watered down Pro one, and in later years, more customers chose Pro over Home. Where I do much of my shopping, at Costco, only a fraction of the computers are Home (or Core), or in the case of 7, Home Premium. 60 to 75% of their computers are loaded with the Pro version of the OS. Some mass retailers has no Pro computers, this is by design, if anyone will notice, the Pro Pack kits for Windows 8/8.1 are sold separately. Am I the only one who gets it? Demand better of the retailers, to carry both configurations, or at a minimum, of the Pro isn't available, then a discount for the Pro Pack kits. All these amounts to, are a key and a downloaded update after successful entry, followed by a reboot. An easy $100 as it gets........

 

I appeal to all to not ignore Preview feedback, and to let MS know these things, the horror stories of the 8.1 upgrades, that if there's a 10.1, to make it a conventional service pack install, if not, it's going to be the same old song & dance. 

 

HatchiNZ, enjoy the Previews, and as I asked above, please give feedback.  :) And make sure you have a Recovery Media set for Windows 7. That OS may need to be there for the final release. Or in the end, the forfeited privacy may be too much to give up. 

 

Our Windows future may very well hinge on giving Feedback. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 October 2014 - 10:41 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 candle_86

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 09:50 PM

Honestly I virtualized it on a my I5 with a single core, 2gb of ram, and at 50% of my chip so right around 1.3ghz, it was slow but useable



#14 cat1092

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 11:14 PM

Did the same on one of mine (i5-480M @ 2.66GHz, 2.90 Turbo Boost), and at first lent 2GB RAM. Slow as molasses, and who are they in saying these will be more efficient than XP? Which runs well on the same specs, and yes, the 64 bit version at that.

 

Finally, after bumping the VirtualBox settings for the OS up to 3.5GB RAM, it became usable, but by no means rocked the world. Due to the way that the initial Windows Technical Preview's first upgrade rolled out, am glad that I physically installed to just two machines, unfortunately one of those were my best. The upgrade wiped out my custom bootloader's settings, and had to go into msconfig just to be able to boot to another drive or OS. I was thankful trhat wasn't messed up, and at the same time vowed that no more of these on my main PC, except for the Final Consumer Preview.

 

I'm finally beginning to agree with some of those who are stating that never versions of Windows, while more features may be offered, this comes at a price. More resource usage, and the engineers of the CPU's are moving in reverse, with releasing lowered frequency chips, which is going to mean on today's notebooks, it'll take an i7 to perform the work that my i5 does, and except for the high performance gaming models ($2000 & up), it'll still be at a lower frequency. Not close to 2.66GHz, except maybe in Turbo Mode.

 

There has been an entire line of new CPU's introduced, along with the introduction of the DDR4 RAM era, and the newer versions of Windows will need the newer hardware to compete. Miscosoft will likely mandate that this new OS is distributed on the newer hadware through retail PC sales, though I've yet to hear of AMD's answer to Intel's DDR4 compatible chip line. Could be out there, but AMD is sure being silent on it, I get their emails, not a word, just the latest GPU's. At the same time, also realize that at a time when a major OS is coming out, many OEM's that has to do with computing is beefing up staff, AMD is cutting. Not a good sign for a corporation that has to answer to the latest Intel CPU technology, or face sure doom. They can't make it on their GPU's alone, many of which are rebranded & those OEM's plus the retailers are making the dough, not AMD.

 

At any rate, the downscaling of computers won't provide the same effect as that of the auto industry & OEM's must start thinking in big numbers again, as in GHz, and it wouldn't hurt to deliver a true mobile quad core CPU, possibly in the i5 line, at a price the mid-level (or mainstream) user can afford. $1000 would be a good starting price for these, with an added graphics card at an extra cost. If mobiles are going to deliver the knock out punch to the tower PC, then the power will have to be packed in there, otherwise forget the same old "the PC is dead" talk. The PC is Not dead, and many Windows 10 OS's will likely land on tower & other desktop PC's.

 

If Windows 10 rolls out on some respectable hardware, the OS just may stand a chance, the watering down of computers also hurt Windows 8 & 8.1 sales. Many users, while they do want longer battery life (hey, I do too), but not at the expense of power. Make the optical drive a portable option & pack a backup battery in there, it's not by any means a new idea, the option was there for my formerly owned Dell Latitude D610 (2005-06 model).

 

Windows 10 has lots of potential, but no one likes the equivalent feeling of pulling a big ski boat behind a 4 cylinder truck. That's what the OEM's are delivering to mainstream customers today & another reason they're keeping their trusty Windows 7 powerhouses. The more apps used, the more power needed. There is no substitute for capable powered computers for the upper mainstream class of users (where the money is) & enthusiasts. We're not settling for wimpy, sub-2.0Ghz CPU's, nor less than 12-16GB RAM.

 

There are minimum requirements of every published version of Windows, some of may remember that the minium for XP was 64MB RAM, though 128MB was recommended, and 1.5GB of drive space. It's not supported today, but try to run the OS on that amount of RAM & HDD & see what's ended up with. Wouldn't have the room for SP2 nor a browser, and would probable run as fast as a snail.

 

More later, MS published that 2GB RAM was the minimum for Windows 7 64 bit, with 20GB drive space. It would barely run on those specs in 2009, let alone today. Windows 8 had similar specs as 7, but again, try to manage on 20GB of storage. These minimums are for lab testing, not that of the real world, nor allows for any extra software to be installed, not even future service packs. It's good that the OEM's are ignoring these, at least on the storage end anyway.

 

I'd call for for the minimum specs of Windows 10 to be a dual core 2.4GHz CPU, 8GB RAM, and around 100GB for storage for a budget computer. That's not unrealistic, and really is a middle of the road biuld as far as specs goes. Perfect to drop in a SSD & retain recovery partition & reinstall functions to work.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 smink

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 08:43 AM

Going by the old adage "if it isn't broke...don't fix it", I would never buy a new OS, by the time Microsoft Windows 10 is ready for prime time you will need a new computer anyway, and it will come with windows 10 and a new warrantee. 






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