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malicious software?


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#1 Ftron

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 01:54 PM

I goofed up real bad.

 

I’m an eBay seller and I received an email telling me that to sign up for global listing I had to click on a link that was attached to this email. I should know better, but without thinking I clicked on it. Then I started thinking that eBay never sends me any emails to my Yahoo account, they always send emails to my eBay sellers account on the eBay website. So after realizing this, I called eBay, and they confirmed that they did not send me this email, and that all the items I have for sale automatically get put in global listings.

 

So now I realize that by clicking on the link on that email, I probably let a virus, or worse, some kind of tracking software into my computer.

 

Can anyone tell me, how I can check my computer for malicious software. I did run MacAfee and Trojan hunter, and they came up clean.

 

I have an HP computer running windows 8 64 bit.    


Edited by Orange Blossom, 03 October 2014 - 02:49 PM.
Moved from Windows 8 to AII. ~ OB


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#2 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:01 PM

It's virtually impossible to get a virus or malware in the way you described.

If the link brought you to a virus installer, you'd still have to accept to install it and if you didn't do that, then you shouldn't have any worries.

In the meantime, for your peace of mind, you could scan with Free Malwarebytes and free Superantispyware {careful to not accept trial versions),


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#3 Ftron

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:05 PM

Thank you, rockysosua. You said careful not to accept trial versions. Are you referring trial versions from Malwarebytes and Superantispyware 



#4 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:10 PM

Yes, during the installations, you will be asked to accept trial versions, so just say no.

On malwarebytes, it's on the last page of the installation and there are two checkmarked boxes.

You have to uncheck the top one to not accept the trial version, otherwise, they will soon be asking you for money.


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#5 QQQQ

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:18 PM

Hey Rocky whats wrong with the trial version? Not sure about Superantispyware but Malwarebytes trial is a good thing, it is the full version which can protect you, not just scan after you get infected. After 14 days the trial ends and you can either buy it or discontinue the trial at that point. Malwarebytes can still be used to scan after the trial has expired, it is just no longer going to block infections.

If you are/were infected and the trial version is running it can block infections from trying to "dial home" and get you reinfected. You will see a popup stating it has blocked an outgoing attempt. Of course if you see it doing this it probably means you still have a trace of malware still on your computer that needs further attention.



#6 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:25 PM

Nothing wrong at all with the trial versions, in fact, the company has to make money to be able to offer the wonderful service that they do, but I would be remiss in my duty to not mention that if people choose the trial versions, they might get pressured to pay X amount of money at a later date.

As these installers to do not warn users that choosing the trial versions will eventually cost them money, it would be easy for a user to get "sucked in" to the trial version, without a clear understanding of the financial implications.

Those affairs are between the software manufacturers and the users, but if I put myself in the middle of it, I feel the need to be a bit more explicit than they are, so as to not place any BC posters/readers into an uncomfortable position.

IE: Yo Rocky. You told me to install such and such software and now they're asking me for money!


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#7 quietman7

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:32 PM

Can I get a virus by reading my email messages?
Most viruses, Trojan horses, and worms are activated when you open an attachment or click a link contained in an email message. If your email client allows scripting, then it is possible to get a virus by simply opening a message. It's best to limit what HTML is available in your email messages. The safest way to view email messages is in plain text.

US-CERT Virus Basics FAQs



Opening HTML or plain-text messages from unknown senders is just as dangerous as opening e-mail attachments from strangers. While most people may know not to open e-mail attachments, many don't realize that dangers can lie in the body of an e-mail as well.  HTML e-mail or messages that contain embedded photos are just as dangerous.  Embedded images and PDFs can contain malicious code that is harmful.

The 10 Most Dangerous Things You Can Do Online!
You can now get infected by opening an e-mail

Although it is possible to get infected by opening an email, doing so is not as prevalent as it used to be. Emails are essentially text or HTML documents (web pages) and opening them to view it's content is generally safe. The danger primarily lies in opening attachments, embedded photos (images and PDFs) containing malicious code, and links that redirect to malicious websites which are dangerous. If you accidentially click a link in a suspicious email be aware of drive-by downloads. When you open a malicious or compromised web page, malicious code can download in the background and be installed on the computer without your knowledge. To learn more about this method of infection, please read Anatomy of a drive-by download web attack.


Email & Attachments: Resources for How to Protect Yourself:


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#8 quietman7

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:35 PM

A 14-day trial of Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Premium is available as a pre-selected default option when first installing the free version so all users can test the real-time protection component/features for a period of two weeks. When the limited time period expires those features will be deactivated and locked. Enabling the Protection Module feature again requires registration and purchase of a license key. If you continue to use the free version, there is no requirement to buy a license...you can just use it as a stand-alone scanner. Users who have previously completed the trial will not be prompted to start the trial upon upgrade or reinstallation.
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#9 Queen-Evie

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:43 PM

Malwarebytes does not ask for money when the trial ends if you choose the Premium trial when you install MBAM.

You will be told on the user interface that the Premium trial license has expired and license is no longer valid.

If you want to continue using Premium, all you have to do is click one of the Buy Premium links.

I have used MBAM Premium trial several times and have never had MBAM nag me to purchase Premium.

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#10 Ftron

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:51 PM

Rocky, I noticed this below your last reply.  He say Trojans horses and worms  are activated when someone clicks on an attachment in an email. Is an attachment the same as a link.

 

posted by  quietman7

 

Posted Today, 05:32 PM

Can I get a virus by reading my email messages?
Most viruses, Trojan horses, and worms are activated when you open an attachment or click a link contained in an email message. If your email client allows scripting, then it is possible to get a virus by simply opening a message. It's best to limit what HTML is available in your email messages. The safest way to view email messages is in plain text.



#11 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:52 PM

Well I'm the newbie here, so y'all tell me.

Would you prefer that I don't mention anything about the trial versions, when recommending Malwarebytes and Superantispyware?


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#12 Ftron

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 04:58 PM

Don't know if you missed the last post I posted. so here it is again. Thank you.

 

Posted Today, 05:51 PM

Rocky, I noticed this below your last reply.  He say Trojans horses and worms  are activated when someone clicks on an attachment in an email. Is an attachment the same as a link.

 

posted by  quietman7

Can I get a virus by reading my email messages?
Most viruses, Trojan horses, and worms are activated when you open an attachment or click a link contained in an email message. If your email client allows scripting, then it is possible to get a virus by simply opening a message. It's best to limit what HTML is available in your email messages. The safest way to view email messages is in plain text.



#13 quietman7

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 05:00 PM

...Is an attachment the same as a link.

No. Did you read the links to the articles I provided which explains in detail? And yes they are safe links.
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#14 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 05:03 PM

 

Rocky, I noticed this below your last reply.  He say Trojans horses and worms  are activated when someone clicks on an attachment in an email. Is an attachment the same as a link.

An attachment is a file that is included in your email.

It could be a picture, a document, etc, and no, it's not the same as clicking on a link.

I have heard multiple theories about drive by virus' and stories of people getting a virus just by clicking on a link or an attachment, but I have yet to see one.

I've had many a cllient come in with an infected machine, telling me that they just clicked on a link or an attachment in their email, so I would ask them to show me.

I have yet to see one as they describe.

It's possible that they download an attachment which is disguised as a picture and it is actually a .exe file (an installer) and the client accepts to run it, then presto, they have a fully functional virus going.

I guess nobody wants to admit that they went the extra mile and installed the darn thing.

 

Over and above taking my job as a tweaker and repairman, quite seriously, my hobby is beating up virus',

When time allows, I'll go in and do battle with the virus, without scanners, just my secret weapon, an unlocker app that allows me to delete files that would be otherwise protected.

It can be tricky at times, but I won't bore you with the details, as the point of mentioning this is that I have a wee bit of experience with virus and malware, and some of the scariest unavoidable virus that are rumoured to be out there, must be really scarce, as I ain't never seen one (pardon the red neck in me).

 

PS: Yes I had seen your question, but I'm a long winded slow typist.


Edited by rockysosua, 03 October 2014 - 05:05 PM.

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#15 quietman7

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 05:12 PM

CryptoLocker, like other forms of ransomware, is typically spread through social engineering...by opening a malicious email attachment (usually from an unknown or unsolicited source). CryptoLocker is disguised in email attachments which appear to be legitimate correspondence from reputable companies such as banks and Internet providers or UPS or FedEx with tracking numbers. US-CERT advises there have been reports that some victims encounter the malware after clicking on a malicious link within an email or following a previous infection from botnets such as Zbot/Z-bot (Zeus) which downloads and executes CryptoLocker as a secondary payload from infected websites.
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