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Updating to Windows 10 Technical preview installs Update for Windows (KB2990214)


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#1 Grinler

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 12:01 PM

If you are updating an existing version of Windows to the Windows 10 Technical Preview, do not be concerned if Windows Update immediately prompts you to reboot your computer because of a new update. It seems the updater installed the Update for Windows (KB2990214) update in order to allow you to install the technical preview.

Here is info about the update, which is not informative at all:

Installation date: ?10/?1/?2014 12:15 PM

Installation status: Pending

Error details: Code 80242014

Update type: Important

Fix for KB2990214

More information:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=2990214

Help and Support:
http://support.microsoft.com



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#2 purplekaycee

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:00 PM

Why is it called 10?

#3 Grinler

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:04 PM

I think they wanted to get as far away from 8 as they could :)

#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:22 PM

Only they know the real reason why they skipped a number, it is a bit misleading though. Actually was Windows 7 really the official 7th release of Windows?

 

Was Vista ever known as Windows 6? I ask because I never cared to own a copy of it.

 

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#5 shoot259

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:30 PM

i'm confused, does this mean that windows 8.1 isnt the newest version of windows out there????



#6 x64

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:34 PM

@MrBruce1959 "Was Vista ever known as Windows 6?"

 

Nothing between Windows 7 and NT4 used its program version number as a product name - See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/ms724832%28v=vs.85%29.aspx for the product name-to-versionnumber mapping.

 

Regards skipping Nine, err Nein err... 9 - If they were not worried about the mockery from a bunch of Bavarian penguin huggers, it's probably a marketing ploy .. We're talking about it, aren't we?

 

x64



#7 x64

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:44 PM

i'm confused, does this mean that windows 8.1 isnt the newest version of windows out there????

Windows 8.1 is still the newest version of Windows out there for general use, and will be for a number of months to come.

 

What was announced yesterday was the next version of Windows, which will not be publically released (or ready for general use) for another six months or so.

 

Whilst you may read about a technical preview program, that is only really aimed at very experienced users (really!). Those who participate in the preview, do so at their own risk (and it is a real risk). If it breaks their PC, they get to keep both pieces!... The preview should not be installed on an important PC, or a system containing important data.

 

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#8 MrBruce1959

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 02:34 PM

Thanks X64 for the link. I was relating to the version numbers, which I see Vista was 6.0. Been a while since I checked those version  against the OS release name, I remembered XP being version 5.1 but lost track since then.

 

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#9 NickAu

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 04:35 PM

 

 

If they were not worried about the mockery from a bunch of Bavarian penguin huggers

I am not Bavarian. My Grand Father was born there, So was my Father,   Ok so I kinda am .......  Never hugged a penguin.

 

 

Number 1 good,  Number 10 bad

 

15wsaf.jpg


Edited by NickAu1, 01 October 2014 - 09:34 PM.


#10 cat1092

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 10:22 PM

I like this Windows Technical Preview, which will eventually become Windows 10, the name for the reason Grinler has mentioned above (which is fact). It's extremely fast & in just the half day I've ran it, is everything Windows 8 should have been. Another cool thing, if one has a Windows 8 or 8.1 computer, many of the drivers for that OS will install to the Preview, at least (most of) the Dell ones. 

 

However, this is an issue that I've seen crop up quite often with the Windows 8 Consumer & Release Previews, which leads to my main point. 

 

Why would anyone take a preview OS, that isn't a Consumer Preview yet & will have to be re-installed in a few months, and overwrite their main OS with it? History tends to repeat itself, no matter how many times we urge folks not to, by the creation of a system image (backup) prior to installing, recovery disc set creation, anything that will allow one to get back to their main OS if needed. 

 

Microsoft places all of these warnings in plain sight (yes they do), but they tend to contradict their own warnings by making an .exe installer for the Technical Preview (as well as prior Previews) available. It's like giving candy to children. If that Windows customer has lost their OS, now they'll have to stick with the flow & purchase the OS, which really is what MS wants. I have no issue with the corporation wanting to sell licenses to use new OS's. 

 

Rather, I have an issue with how MS makes it too easy for it's customers to lose focus on the main things we try to teach. Backing up our computers, creating recovery media, safe computing practices. 

 

These preview OS's should be ISO only, for safety. Yes, for now these testers will be able to keep (most of) their installed software, documents, pictures, etc. But come late February/early March, those things are going to be gone, as the next Preview will have to be a clean install. That's right. Testers can then keep their documents & personal items, but the OS will be wiped clean. All of the software collection will be gone & some of it may not be permitted to be re-installed. 

 

If one has no other way to go back & wants to, the last gasp effort will be needed & that's to purchase recovery media from one's OEM. 

 

The other thing that I have against this type of install (upgrade installs), is that if these were to go as planned, all would be good. However, we have many ongoing Topics on the forum as I'm typing this post, customers upgrading from Windows 8 to 8.1 & having all sorts of troubles. Neither MS, nor the OEM's, has answers to many of these issues. One of my 8.1 upgrades had to be redone & fortunately, I had created a backup prior to the upgrade. 

 

As far as the Topic name goes, if one Google searches the KB, there are only three hits & the first is this Topic. Normally MS publishes these things, but they haven't this time. I only hope that it's not something to prevent users from going back to their prior OS, that it's an anti-piracy update. 

 

One thing for sure, for those who took the time to read the Agreement prior to installing, Microsoft will have lots of access to all of it's tester's personal information. Refusal to allow MS to collect further information will result in being booted from the Preview, which all goes back to the things of safety I mentioned above. 

 

Windows 10 looks like it'll be a good OS, I'm on it now, it's lightening fast, even after I disabled hibernation, System Restore, adjusted page file size drastically & a few other tweaks that SSD users performs. We shouldn't be throwing all caution in the wind, though, safety should be the first priority of any job. 

 

Enjoy the Previews! :guitar: We have a year's jump on the majority of the ones who will purchase the finished product. 

 

EDIT: Please Give Feedback!! MS are listening to us this time & have placed a Windows Feedback shortcut in your Start Menu, which BTW, is the old school one we loved with a new look.  :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 01 October 2014 - 10:26 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 BeckoningChasm

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:22 AM

I think they went with "Windows 10" because they wanted to break the "even numbers" curse.  (It's like the opposite of Star Trek movies.)



#12 rockysosua

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:45 AM

@ cat11092,

Although I have different perceptions than you, I certainly share your view on creating a system image before installing.

The exceptions being VM & dual boot installations.

I wonder if there's a need to have yet another Windows 10 thread with a title that warns our users to make an image first.

Something like.

CREATE SYSTEN IMAGE BEFORE INSTALLING 10.

It may save a few people from bad surprises.

What do you think?


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#13 softeyes

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 12:13 PM

@cat1092 ~ I really appreciate the way you drafted your post!  It was so easy to follow and gave great insight.  I'll never be a tester, however I really enjoy those of you that do!  Your post was just great..thank you!



#14 pcpunk

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:17 PM

cat1092:  Don't you guys use Virtual Machines for this in some cases, or is it not possible.


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#15 cat1092

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 10:48 PM

Excellent Idea, rockysusua!


 

 

CREATE SYSTEN IMAGE BEFORE INSTALLING 10.

It needs to be in bold. There's already some whom has torched their installs over a what was formerly known as a Developer Preview. Windows Technical Preview is not a consumer preview. 

 


 

 

I wonder if there's a need to have yet another Windows 10 thread with a title that warns our users to make an image first.

You're probably right, no one will listen anyway. I've been down this road for what will be the last three Windows releases. Does no good, and getting myself worked up over nothing. I'm getting older, less healthy and why die of a heart attack over silly mess as this. If testers can't read before taking the plunge, it's their backsides. not mine. 

 

My two Windows 10 Technical Preview installs are either dual boot or on a second PC with no other OS installed. The first was imaged, the latter was a PC acquired for less than $50 (after shipping), so with no OS on it, nothing to lose. Both runs great, so far, is shaping up to be everything that Windows 8 wasn't. Not that it was a totally bad OS, neither was Vista after a couple of SP's. Rather, it was public perception that killed Windows 8 from the (or before the) very start. Many minds were made up months before Windows 8 became reality & they were spreading the word, some by doctored YouTube videos. 

 

Great to interact with you again.  :)

 


 

@cat1092 ~ I really appreciate the way you drafted your post!  It was so easy to follow and gave great insight.  I'll never be a tester, however I really enjoy those of you that do!  Your post was just great..thank you!

 

softeyes, it's really not hard. The main thing to do is follow basic safety practices, as outlined above. If you have a spare drive laying around, you can temporarily disconnect your main one, please make sure the system has been removed from wall socket, and then press the power button for 30 seconds to purge the extra power as that residual power can be lethal. Once this is done, install your spare drive to the computer (many has a second bay with power cable, a Data one may be needed). 

 

Re-power & install the Preview, go ahead & update it & install a few of your favorite software choices. Repeat the procedure above & re-install the main drive. Note that if this is a Windows 8 or above OS pre-installed, extra steps will (or may) be necessary if Secure Boot is enabled. My instructions are based on a computer that was built to run Windows 7 or lower. 

 

Once back into Windows 7, here's where the fun comes in. EasyBCD 2.2 is what I use to boot Linux OS's & Windows. This is 100% Free software for Home users. There is instruction on the site & this is the Genuine site for the software. 

 

http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

 

It's really easy.  :)

 


 

 

cat1092:  Don't you guys use Virtual Machines for this in some cases, or is it not possible.

 

pcpunk, the only times I run virtual machines are on Linux installs & when I do, it's a final test to determine if the real deal is for me or not. As pre-OS tester, I cannot get a real feel for the OS in a virtual environment. Though for the ultimate in safety, it can be tested in a VM, the tester will miss out on some of the features. Rather, as I explained to softeyes above, this is where a spare HDD or dual boot comes in (after imaging what we have first). 

 

I'll go along with many in stating that VM's has a purpose in the IT industry. These has, along with newer versions of Windows, has allowed employers to have a single employee to do the work of 3 to 4 employees of the Windows 95-XP days & out government need to be looking at this valuable resource, to trim waste. No need to have 16 employees, making huge salaries & the costly perks that goes with the position (such as actually working only two out of every eight hours) doing many of these jobs, when 4 is all that's needed. If every governmental agency in the country took this approach, some localities may be able to balance the budget through employee savings alone. 

 

Same with corporations of all types, problem is, the "buddy system" is in place & isn't going to be broken to save cash. They'll cut at the low-skilled labor level, forcing more physical work onto the backs of low wage employees. I see things differently, it needs to be a top-down approach, rather than a bottom up. Virtual computing platforms from the top down, is the answer for huge savings. 

 

So I'm not going to call your plan a bad one, it may be perfect for many & is very much possible, as you've asked. It just isn't for me. I want my OS's to have the benefit of all of the computer's resources, something that no VM can do. Being that I don't have a payroll and cost savings isn't an issue for me, I plan to roll full steam ahead. 

 

Speaking of which, lets begin. Can VirtualBox in the majority of computers run this quick? 

 

1) Overall SSD Test. This is running the Windows 10 Technical preview, with custom drivers added, not what MS fed us, which left a few things in the Device Manager with question marks. 

 

as-ssd-benchCrucial_CT256M5510120143-20-

 

2) ASuperAntiSpyware "Quick Scan". On some machines this may, if the person is lucky, complete in 90 seconds, 2-3 minutes is typical. 15 seconds is in the elite class (of DDR3 era hardware). 

 

Capture.png

 

3) Resource Usage. My PC's first birthday was today! It arrived by FedEx & I first booted it on 10/03/2013. But at this resource usage, I have to wonder, is my PC broken in yet? Is the Thermal Paste cured? Normally, it takes some revving up the resources to do that, have had 3 virus or Malware scanners going at once, plus several browser tabs open. 

 

Am having a hard time getting either the CPU or RAM to bust the 35% mark, actually the CPU seldom sees 20%, the RAM gets used a little more. Every other computer that I've had has hit the 100% wall with CPU resources, with this one, can we compare it to the older Toyota's? They weren't considered "broken in" until after they cleared the first 100,000 miles. Looks like the i7-4770 is a cruiser. 

 

CapturePNGTaskManagerWindows10preview.pn

 

Yet, that is not enough & my eyes are already setting on the future, chips with DDR4 RAM are out. As I was advising others just 3-4 months back, was telling, just wait a bit, the good stuff is going to be here & any cash spent on that technology (at those prices) would be a waste & no remote hope of recouping 25% of the cash invested. There will be tons of promos on all of this DDR3 hardware, to force it to move, and get consumers on what will be today's bandwagon. Look for deep discounts come Black Friday of this year if you're a bargain hunter, but if one's an enthusiast, ship this event, it's not for you, don't bother. On the other hand, the new hardware is released, DDR4 is here! :guitar:

 

Moore's Law is about to take another step forward. Come another year, after Newegg & many of the other clearinghouses moves the hardware we're using at promo pricing & consumers are forced to purchase DDR4 based computers, we'll see it as as a favor. All of the above images will either be half of (resource usage), or will complete in half of the posted times (those who spends a bit of extra cash on enthusiast hardware). 

 

When Windows 10 is released, it's going to be on modern hardware, not on that what most consumers are running today. The DDR3 era was a great run, but greater things lies ahead for those who waits, today is just not the time to even think of purchasing a new computer & in the case one does, there's lots of haggling room. Paying sticker price is very unwise, maybe 60-70% of the price, if the hardware is highly ranked. Lower end stuff will be $25 yard sale bargains next year, or in the spring of 2016.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 03 October 2014 - 10:50 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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