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Hosting Webmail and need to make it available on the internet


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18 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 03:30 AM

Hi, 

 

I am running a mail server which has a webmail interface that i want accessible on the internet. The webmail interface can be accesses on the LAN by [IP Address]/mail.

 

example:

 

router: 10.0.0.1

server's IP: 10.0.0.132

webmail internal: 10.0.0.132/mail

webmail external (to be): mail.domain.com

 

I have registered a domain and have several virtual hosts running of the same server using ServerAlias to match the desired subdomain therefore not needing an internal dns server.  

 

I have tried installing a dns server on the same server but i cant see a way to direct the incoming http request mail.domain.com to 10.0.0.132/mail.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Simon Lehmann



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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 05:44 AM

I am assuming that you can send and receive mail from inside to outside and back? What email server software are you using? I'm thinking you need to forward some ports. 


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#3 Kilroy

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 05:46 AM

How are you connected to the Internet?  May ISPs block mail ports unless you have a business class account.



#4 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 06:51 AM

Hi, thanks for your prompt replies.

 

The mail service itself is running perfectly via port 25. its the webmail interface webpage i want to make available outside the LAN.

 

Thanks

 

Simon Lehmann



#5 Ivy74

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 08:15 AM

Hi, thanks for your prompt replies.

 

The mail service itself is running perfectly via port 25. its the webmail interface webpage i want to make available outside the LAN.

 

Thanks

 

Simon Lehmann

Two things. I assume you setup IIS. Also, make sure the necessary ports are open on the firewall.


***Note***

My job has blocked Europe by the firewall which means I can't access this site from the office anymore. So I will barely be here if at all. In case you cared.  :smash:


#6 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 09:00 AM

 

Hi, thanks for your prompt replies.

 

The mail service itself is running perfectly via port 25. its the webmail interface webpage i want to make available outside the LAN.

 

Thanks

 

Simon Lehmann

Two things. I assume you setup IIS. Also, make sure the necessary ports are open on the firewall.

 

As i said, everything to to with the mail functionality is working perfectly. it is the webmail interface webpage i want available on the internet.  



#7 Ivy74

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 11:48 AM

Try this.

 

http://www.abyssunderground.co.uk/beginners-accessing.php

 

But the key is to test the web face portion internal. If that works then it's just a matter of making a doorway sort of speak through your firewall. You will also have to do a re-direct of that doorway to the server hosting the mail. It's easy but requires additional steps but much like when I test RDP after configuring it, I always test internal access. I also assume you have a static external IP. 

 

You say the email server works but I am not clear if the OWA works internally. Technically two different things. For instance: http://127.0.0.1/mail <--just an example


***Note***

My job has blocked Europe by the firewall which means I can't access this site from the office anymore. So I will barely be here if at all. In case you cared.  :smash:


#8 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 09:22 PM

Thanks. I will give it a try.

Yes sorry. The web interface works fine internal (http://ipaddress/mail)

#9 Kilroy

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 05:53 AM

Are you using a business class ISP?  Many ISPs block port 25, so it will never work.



#10 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 10:14 AM

No. Fourth time saying now that the mail side of things is working fine. It's the WEBMAIL ISER INTERFACE that I want to make available on the Internet.

Think of it like any web app; http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/app

#11 CaveDweller2

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 09:33 PM

I only said it once but others have said it a few times -  FORWARD PORTS. I asked the name of the software but you never answered. So look up what port(s) the web interface of your server uses and poke that hole(s) in your firewall aka port forwarding in your router.


Edited by CaveDweller2, 01 October 2014 - 09:33 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#12 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 02 October 2014 - 05:36 AM

The server uses the following ports:

 

SMTP - 25

IMAP - 143

HTTP (Webmail) - 80/443

 

all ports have been allowed in the firewall and port forwarded. 

 

I may be understanding this wrong but i thought the problem here was the DNS. On the LAN you enter http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/mail to access the webmail interface. Just port fawarding port 80 and 443 doesn't mean entering http://mail.domain.com is going to work. I thought some sort of DNS record(s) needs to be in place to join the dots.

 

Am i wrong?



#13 Ivy74

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Posted 02 October 2014 - 10:30 AM

The server uses the following ports:

 

SMTP - 25

IMAP - 143

HTTP (Webmail) - 80/443

 

all ports have been allowed in the firewall and port forwarded. 

 

I may be understanding this wrong but i thought the problem here was the DNS. On the LAN you enter http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/mail to access the webmail interface. Just port fawarding port 80 and 443 doesn't mean entering http://mail.domain.com is going to work. I thought some sort of DNS record(s) needs to be in place to join the dots.

 

Am i wrong?

You can easily rule out DNS by doing http://publicip/mail that alone will tell you if you can reach the server past the firewall. But everything you mentioned screams firewall.


***Note***

My job has blocked Europe by the firewall which means I can't access this site from the office anymore. So I will barely be here if at all. In case you cared.  :smash:


#14 Guest_slehmann36_*

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 03:27 AM

 

The server uses the following ports:

 

SMTP - 25

IMAP - 143

HTTP (Webmail) - 80/443

 

all ports have been allowed in the firewall and port forwarded. 

 

I may be understanding this wrong but i thought the problem here was the DNS. On the LAN you enter http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/mail to access the webmail interface. Just port fawarding port 80 and 443 doesn't mean entering http://mail.domain.com is going to work. I thought some sort of DNS record(s) needs to be in place to join the dots.

 

Am i wrong?

You can easily rule out DNS by doing http://publicip/mail that alone will tell you if you can reach the server past the firewall. But everything you mentioned screams firewall.

 

Yes, http://domain.com/mail does work but i need http://mail.domain.com.

 

I have set up the subdomain in the DNS management system from my domain name provider but there must be something inside the LAN listening for http://mail.domain.com. Thats why i thought DNS. 

 

I have tried setting a server alias for the mail server but it does not support that functionality. 

 

Is there anything else I can do.



#15 Ivy74

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 08:11 AM

 

 

The server uses the following ports:

 

SMTP - 25

IMAP - 143

HTTP (Webmail) - 80/443

 

all ports have been allowed in the firewall and port forwarded. 

 

I may be understanding this wrong but i thought the problem here was the DNS. On the LAN you enter http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/mail to access the webmail interface. Just port fawarding port 80 and 443 doesn't mean entering http://mail.domain.com is going to work. I thought some sort of DNS record(s) needs to be in place to join the dots.

 

Am i wrong?

You can easily rule out DNS by doing http://publicip/mail that alone will tell you if you can reach the server past the firewall. But everything you mentioned screams firewall.

 

Yes, http://domain.com/mail does work but i need http://mail.domain.com.

 

I have set up the subdomain in the DNS management system from my domain name provider but there must be something inside the LAN listening for http://mail.domain.com. Thats why i thought DNS. 

 

I have tried setting a server alias for the mail server but it does not support that functionality. 

 

Is there anything else I can do.

 

Isn't that where C-Name comes into play. Where you are hosting "external" DNS you can create C-Names. So for instance my companies domain lets say is XYZ.COM and I wanted Remote Desktop access but not have to remember the public IP. So I created a C-Name where it associates RDP to the public IP and I would type rdp.xyz.com and I would get there. Similar concept to email. You associate mail to your public IP for that domain and then it becomes mail.xyz.com. Makes sense?


***Note***

My job has blocked Europe by the firewall which means I can't access this site from the office anymore. So I will barely be here if at all. In case you cared.  :smash:





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