Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

What is the best anti-virus/malware software? Disillusioned with Malwarebytes


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 fullhse

fullhse

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:00 AM

Hi, I have been using Malwarebytes for several years after having had some brushes with nasty malware on previous computers. My son recently spilled water on his laptop keyboard, and had to get it replaced. The diligent repair shop also ran virus checks, and found over 1900 registry keys as well as one nasty root virus. He runs Malwarebytes every couple days so I am wondering what we could have done better? He really does not surf the net except to run Steam and to log into his school's secure sites like Blackboard and WebCampus. Any advice would be great (he is running Windows 7 on a dell laptop).



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 kokomodrums

kokomodrums

  • Members
  • 202 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indiana
  • Local time:10:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:03 AM

Do you know what software the repair shop used?


-- Matt


#3 fullhse

fullhse
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:12 AM

I do not - but will call them and ask.



#4 fullhse

fullhse
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:19 AM

They used PC CLeaner and Malwarebytes, and then manually went into the registry to remove files and programs that did not belong.



#5 fullhse

fullhse
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:25 AM

Sorry, CC cleaner (typo)



#6 Queen-Evie

Queen-Evie

    Official Bleepin' G.R.I.T.S. (and proud of it)


  • Members
  • 16,485 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:My own little corner of the universe (somewhere in Alabama). It's OK, they know me here
  • Local time:10:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 11:47 AM

What, if any, antivirus is/was he using?

If none, Malwarebytes is not an antivirus.
 

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is not meant to be a replacement for antivirus software. Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a complementary but essential program which detects and removes zero-day malware and "Malware in the Wild".

https://helpdesk.malwarebytes.org/hc/en-us/articles/201861736-Does-Malwarebytes-Anti-Malware-replace-antivirus-software-

 
As for the "best" antivirus, everyone has his/her own opinion.
 
There is no size fits all when it comes to internet security. Sometimes a program won't play nice with a system. What works for one person may not work for you. I've tried security programs that made my computer crawl slower than a turtle. One of them made the computer so slow I could not get to add remove programs to get rid of it. I ended up reinstalling Windows to make it go away.
 
For the past 2 or 3 years I've been using Eset Smart Security (for purchase program). It works well for us.

Do you want a free program or do you want to purchase one? If free, there are some good ones available. You might have to try several of them to find the one that works best for you.

Do you want only an antivirus or a suite that includes a firewall?

IF you decide to purchase an antivirus or security suite do this first:

Go to the website of the program. See if it has a free trial-most of the major products do.  Install the free trial on all computers (only if you there is an option for multiple license if you want to possibly use it on all computers). This will give you a chance to see if it works well with each system and if it is user friendly. Trial versions are fully functional.

You would not want to find out that it doesn't play nice with one of the computers after your buy the product.

Sometimes there is a bonus when using trials: if you give them your email address they may send you special offer close to the end of the trial. Also be aware that you may get a "purchase nag" screen which is worth putting up with in order to find out if works for you.

Free programs may also have a nag screen meant to entice you into upgrading to a paid version of the program.

I urge you to read this which may help you decide which product to use Choosing an Anti-Virus Program
It includes a list of free programs.
 
Whatever you do you can keep Malwarebytes and he can continue to scan with it when he runs a virus scan.
Malwarebytes is an excellent program but it has to be used in addition to an antivirus.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 26 September 2014 - 12:12 PM.


#7 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,900 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:10:31 AM

Posted 26 September 2014 - 04:10 PM

While CCleaner is safe and useful for removing these temporary and junk files, I do not recommend using the built-in registry cleaning feature unless you have a good understanding of the registry. In fact, Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons.

Why you should not use Registry Cleaners and Optimization Tools

It is not uncommon for registry cleaners to find thousands of "so-called issues" with registry keys so I wouldn't be concerned about those kind of findings since most of them are not actually harmful to a computer system. Keep in mind that some Tech support folks and scammers will use such findings to scare customers into thinking their computer is infected or has major problems when that is not the case. Showing issues and errors from Event Viewer is another method they use to scare folks and make them believe the computer is in need of repair. These are common tactics scammers use in order to goad people into paying for unnecessary computer repairs so they can make money. Since most folks know very little about Windows registry or Event Viewer, they are easily alarmed and therefore willing to pay.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users