Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Itís external data storage replacement time.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Ponzio

Ponzio

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:39 PM

Posted 21 September 2014 - 02:31 AM

Well my 3 redundant 2 TB external hard drives are ¾ full …. 80% is music (MP3 & FLAC files) … and one of them is acting up, so I figure it’s time to replace them all before the other 2 go south too.  I’ve done some superficial research so far and I’m looking at the 4 TB Western Digital My Book units …

http://www.amazon.com/Book-USB-Hard-Drive-Backup/dp/B00E3RH61W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411214993&sr=8-1&keywords=4tb+my+book

… or the more expensive Drobo.  Advantage is that it’s pseudo-RAID unit but the disadvantage is that there is another outlay for the hard drives.

http://www.amazon.com/Drobo-4-Bay-Storage-Array-DDR3A21/dp/B00JLR8IZ2/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1411215069&sr=1-1&keywords=drobo

 

Any and all opinions appreciated.

 

I was also wondering, is there a maximum amount of external data storage that Windows 7 (64-bit) will recognize? I know on Windows XP there was a 2 TB volume limitation.

 

Thanks


Edited by Ponzio, 21 September 2014 - 05:24 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 gavinseabrook

gavinseabrook

  • Members
  • 773 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:El Paso
  • Local time:01:39 PM

Posted 21 September 2014 - 02:52 AM

Why don't you get a good NAS drive and fill it with high capacity drives with a RAID Lvl 5 or 10 configuration? This way you can effectively get up to 16 TB of storage space.

 

I recommend the Seagate NAS 4Bay STCU100. It handles every type of Raid Lvl and if you have the money to do it, you can get the full 16 TB of drive space and not have to worry about it for years!

 

Gavin Seabrook

 


#3 Ponzio

Ponzio
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:39 PM

Posted 21 September 2014 - 05:20 AM

 

Why don't you get a good NAS drive and fill it with high capacity drives with a RAID Lvl 5 or 10 configuration? This way you can effectively get up to 16 TB of storage space.

 

I recommend the Seagate NAS 4Bay STCU100. It handles every type of Raid Lvl and if you have the money to do it, you can get the full 16 TB of drive space and not have to worry about it for years!

 

 

I've been running my current setup (three 2 TB USB 3.0 Fantom external HD's) for 9 years, which seems to me to be a pretty good run and that's why I'm trying to emulate it.  I realize that Fantom isn't considered in high regard in  the computer world but for the $360 I spent for the 3 units, I have no complaint and it does what I want and my data is redundant, should a failure occur in any of the units.  Previously I owned a 2 TB Buffalo NAS RAID unit which I was relatively happy with until 1 of the HD's failed and the replacement cost ($350) I thought was exorbitant, there was the occasional network down time and since I use it as my main repository for my music collection I need the files to be readily accessible and I want to avoid any issues with jitter and whatnot for my music files.  I currently use my PC based DNLA to access files anywhere in the house thru my Verizon FiOS router, via a hardwire LAN setup.  Even with a hardwire setup there seems to be a lag anytime I access a music file remotely thru the network which doesn't occur when I access them directly thru my PC, connected via the USB 3.0 cable.  Obviously the diskless units weren't available in 2005 at this price point, so now it gives me something to think about. 

 

I have a budget of $500 for 4 TB's or more for the whole shebang ... thanks.


Edited by Ponzio, 21 September 2014 - 09:58 AM.


#4 gavinseabrook

gavinseabrook

  • Members
  • 773 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:El Paso
  • Local time:01:39 PM

Posted 25 September 2014 - 01:02 AM

Well the Seagate NAS 4Bay STCU100 is only about $280.00. Spend the rest on hard drives after that. You can do 2 drives running Raid 1 for your mirroring or you can run 4 drives in raid 5 or 10 for performance, but you have the threat of data loss as Raid 5 is vulnerable with drive failure. If your doing a lot of multimedia access/media streaming, I would recommend getting a Netgear Nighthawk 3200 as it has its own media server, usb port for hard drive access (and just keep a backup drive handy to back it up manually ever so often) and it has its own dual core processor. That and combined with 6 Wifi antennas (tri-band) you get a combined 3.2 Gbps wifi signal. It is what I currently use and I can tell you it is a great setup and is within your budget.


Gavin Seabrook

 


#5 Ponzio

Ponzio
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:39 PM

Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:04 AM

yeah, the more I research the diskless units, the more I'm leaning that way

 

thank you ... you've been very helpful..  I think it comes down between the 3 stand alone's or the diskless in RAID 1 ... 'probably.



#6 Ponzio

Ponzio
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:39 PM

Posted 15 October 2014 - 06:04 AM

Decided to purchase one 4 TB WD My Book 3.0 USB external desktop HDD last week for evaluation purposes based on the sale price of $130 (including shipping) at NewEgg and in a worst case scenario, I could use it to portably transport my data to another PC, if needed.

PROS:
Price … extremely quiet, even during massive file transfers (1.7 TB) … 2 year warranty … good air-flow design, felt cool to the touch even after transferring 1.7 TB of data, in a continuous 12 hour period … WD reliability, based on past ownership of WD HDD’s for PC’s and installation in external desktop enclosures … fast read/write functions, as compared to my existing 3.0 USB Fantom units … averaged about 48 MB's a second transfer speed.

CONS:
Glossy black plastic exterior is a fingerprint magnet … no power button, which totally baffles me (power is handled by connecting/disconnecting the power adaptor). You can enable the sleep function, thru the provided WD software suite, which I’ve opted not to install, for various reasons … subjectively the unit doesn’t feel too sturdy (plastic vs. metal enclosures of the Fantom’s) and I doubt it could handle a fall beyond 3 inches and I’m not about to test it to find out.

I have no regrets whatsoever about purchasing the My Book, since I feel you always need a backup to all your data which is independent of your PC/network but it has crystalized how I will handle data storage/backup in the future. I’m in the middle of having a custom PC built and I plan on installing two 4 TB eSATA HDD’s in the drive bays, besides the main two 1 TB RAID 0 (mirror) HDD’s for the OS and programs, dedicated to storage/backup for faster read/write abilities and to save space on my desk. A single spare HDD would suffice but my paranoia runs deep after my first HDD failure in the mid-90’s, which still haunts me to this day, and I haven’t been caught flat-footed since. I’ve probably jinxed myself. All it would take is one massive lightning strike to wipe all of them out ... must remember to disconnect the My Book when not in use
... I told you my paranoia runs deep.  :crazy: 


I want to thank everyone for their input and advice ... take care.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users