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Microsoft account security alert( Is this a scam)


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 05:42 PM

I just got this email and am wondering if its real. Yes that's my email address, However I do not have a Microsoft account, Why would I?

 

No I did not click anything.

 

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#2 Didier Stevens

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 06:33 PM

It's fake. Google for "microsoft account team" (with quotes) and you'll find several examples.

 

You could also look at the sender.

 

If you post the source of the e-mail, I'll show you other signs (warning: this source contains data you might not want to disclose).


Edited by Didier Stevens, 13 September 2014 - 06:33 PM.

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#3 NickAu

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 07:37 PM

Figured that as I have never set up a M$ account. I have deleted the email.

 

Thanks Dider for your time.

 

At last somebody tried to scam me, I felt like even the scamers didn't like me because this is a first for me, Only other time was from "Tech support"  they said something about scanning my Windows pc and that it was infected, I played along for a while, Got bored hung up.

 

Hm , My windows pc? I do not use windows.


Edited by NickAu1, 13 September 2014 - 08:04 PM.


#4 quietman7

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 07:43 PM

The Microsoft account Security alert is a phishing scam has been around for a couple years now. Here is another example from the "so called" Microsoft account team. This type of bogus email is used by criminals to steal your personal information in order to access your account.

Cybercriminals often use the names of well-known companies, like ours, in their scams. They think it will convince you to give them money or your personal information. While they usually use email to trick you, they sometimes use the telephone, instead....We do not send unsolicited email messages or make unsolicited phone calls to request personal or financial information or fix your computer. If you receive an unsolicited email message or phone call that purports to be from Microsoft and requests that you send personal information or click links, delete the message or hang up the phone. Microsoft does not make unsolicited phone calls to help you fix your computer.

Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently

For more information and additional helpful links, please refer to these Microsoft articles:
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#5 rp88

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 10:57 PM

I would assume one could detect if this sort of thing were a scam simply by hovering over the "make your account more secure" link. If the email is a scam then when you see the url appear at the bottom left of your browser (this happens in chrome when one hovers over a link) it will be one that is not a microsoft domain, if it were a genuine email then you would see a URL which clearly belonged to microsoft. Also one would think that if microsoft sends out emails they will be addressed to people by whatever name the individual gave to microsoft when they signed up for an ms account, emails that only refer to the intended reader by their email address are almost ( well we might as well omit the "almost", i can't imagine any reason a legit email from anyone to anyone else would not refer to the reader by some sort of name, even if that name was just an alias that the reader uses somewhere online) guaranteed to be scams. "view original text" as it is called in gmail, or equivalents also give one a way to see if an email is a scam, just search the long garbled original text for web  and email addresses if any of them are different to who the sender claims to be that is a sure sign the email is a lie.


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#6 Didier Stevens

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 03:46 AM

Here are some signs for this e-mail that it was not from a large corporation that has a QA-cycle for e-mails:

 

"Microsoft account team": account and team are not capitalized.

"Thanks": would be Thank you

 

Large corporations spend a lot of money on their communications, they don't make such mistakes.


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#7 quietman7

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 08:05 AM

Here are some signs for this e-mail that it was not from a large corporation that has a QA-cycle for e-mails:
 
"Microsoft account team": account and team are not capitalized.
"Thanks": would be Thank you
 
Large corporations spend a lot of money on their communications, they don't make such mistakes.

Unfortunately many in the younger generation cannot spell correctly or use proper grammer so they seldom notice such mistakes and easily become victims.
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#8 Crazy Cat

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 09:46 PM

Here are some signs for this e-mail that it was not from a large corporation that has a QA-cycle for e-mails: "Microsoft account team": account and team are not capitalized."Thanks": would be Thank you Large corporations spend a lot of money on their communications, they don't make such mistakes.

Unfortunately many in the younger generation cannot spell correctly or use proper grammer so they seldom notice such mistakes and easily become victims.
Since I used "Thanks" twice in my lastest PM too you, does that mean I'm young again? Smiley-ROFL.gif

And it also comes down to American English "grammer" and Queens English "grammar".
 

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. ― Albert Einstein ― Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

 

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#9 styler001

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 11:18 PM

Actually, I have to disagree with the part regarding them replying as "The Microsoft account team" with the last two words in lower case, and them saying "Thanks" instead of "Thank you".

 

I just got one of those Microsoft account security alert emails on my Yahoo account.  I couldn't remember signing up with my Yahoo account, but after logging in on MS Live's site (without clicking on anything in the email), it appears that I really did.  I changed my password (figured it couldn't hurt to do that anyway) and got a notification back ending with...

 

 

Thanks,

The Microsoft account team



#10 Sintharius

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 12:15 AM

A Microsoft account security email to someone with a fear of windows? (or is it Windows? :P )

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#11 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 04:25 AM

Just because you have a Microsoft account does not mean such an email is legitimate.
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#12 Aura

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 06:29 AM

Just because you have a Microsoft account does not mean such an email is legitimate.


This. Otherwise, every emails for every accounts you have "would" be legitimate and there's no such things. There's so many phishing emails for Paypal alone, imagine if everyone was falling for them, over half the people using Paypal would lose their account.

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#13 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 07:37 AM

Social Engineering has become on of the most prolific tactics for distribution of malware. The attacker relies heavily on human interaction (the weakest link in security) and often involves tricking people in order to achieve the attacker's desired result.
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#14 Aura

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 07:53 AM

Not only social engineering is used to infect people, but it's also massively used to steal from websites, companies, etc. A lot of people uses social engineering to get "refunds" or "returns" from websites like Ebay, Amazon, etc. despite the fact that they never ordered anything or if they did they say that they didn't receive it and ends up with paying once to have two copies of the item. When it comes to the Internet you should be even more mefiant than you are in real life since anything could be malicious or a scam.

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#15 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 07:59 AM

Whatever works for the cybercriminals, they will use...especially if it is something easy and reaches a large target audience.
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