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can hard disk circuit board be replaced?


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#1 panthera0404

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 07:11 PM

i have one older seagate disk, and its connectors are destroyed beyond repair.
on ebay I found the same circuit board, same model and everything, its not expensive, but im interested if it will work if you just replace circuit board or do I have to replace the rom chip as well


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 07:51 PM

I have done it several times with success.


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#3 Platypus

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 07:52 PM

If the board is the same revision level, there's a good chance it will be successful (assuming the ebay drive is sound). As OldPhil indicates, this technique is used for situations like recovering drive contents when a board has suffered other faults like failed servo controller or the like. If the board is a different revision then it may not work, and swapping ROM, even if you could manage to do it, can't be expected to help, as a board revision level implies more than a firmware variation.


Edited by Platypus, 12 September 2014 - 07:54 PM.
Allowing for OldPhil's post

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#4 Philip_Booth

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 02:10 AM

In many instances from component failure to corrosion to faulty construction methods a PCB would fail leaving you scratching your head on what to do to recover your data. Many people purchase identical hard drives on online marketing in the hopes that they can simply replace the PCB and all will be good in the world, but unfortunately many cases doesnot match. I suggest you plese go to the trustwothy company to solve the problem for security issue of your valuable data.



#5 OldPhil

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:06 AM

Won't argue the issue, I had very good success even with mismatch in volume size.  Well worth trying as opposed to professional costs. 


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#6 Platypus

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:37 AM

I had very good success even with mismatch in volume size. 

Yes, that is not usually a problem, reasonably modern drives with a significant portion of the firmware stored on the platter means the board reads the correct info from there. IMO there's no doubt panthera has a worthwhile chance of success.


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#7 rotor123

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 11:55 AM

Hi

FWIW I concur with Platypus, I have done the circuit board transplant when I had two identical drives. One had many bad sectors and the other had the SATA Power and Data connectors broken. It worked with no problems after the transplant.

 

You said it wasn't expensive, I would say it is worth a try.

 

I have also have a drive that had a broken off plastic center for the SATA Data Connector where I had the broken piece and the little connector fingers were still OK. I was able to Place the plastic piece back where it belonged, Plug in the data cable. Test the drive, success. Then I used a little epoxy to secure the cable permanently. That drive is still in use by me in a small home server.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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#8 panthera0404

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 07:22 PM

thank you all for answers
I ordered a circuit board. I have nothing to lose, €20 is worth the risk. Its an old drive, I have no idea what is on that drive, and im just curious, this disk is 7, 8 years old.
i will report results in a week or two


#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 07:49 PM

This is the main reason I never throw out a hard drive, working or not.  I've resurected many older dries that users kept but didn't know they could be fixed.  Quantum, Seagate, Maxtor, Western Digital and Samsung have been of the many that were recovered with equivilent board swaps.  Power connectors get the most abuse and board edge connectors get jammed and cracked easily and repairs are simple with available parts.






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