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Win 7 won't boot, BSOD error code c000021a


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#1 stantech

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 03:49 PM

I have a win 7 pro sytem that won't boot. It goes to the BSOD, error code C000021a,
status codes 0xc0000001 and 0x000010ad8.  I have tried booting to safe mode and running
"Last know good configuration", Running a system recovery disk and trying suystem restore and
Startup Repair.  I also tried running bootrec.exe /fixboot and fixmbr from command prompt.
I can acces the drive when connected to another computer.  I ran dskchk /f/r/x in this
confguration and in ran good.  I also tried a win 7 disk and ran SFC /scannow. 
I also verified that the computer hardware is good using another hdd that booted good. 
Not sure what to try next.  Hope you can help
 



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#2 rockysosua

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:07 PM

Geez,

I don't think I have anything else to suggest, but I just had to take a minute out to say how impressed I am with everything you did.

I can't even train an apprentice tech in my shop to rationalize the way you did and cover all those bases.

Kudos to you.

I will look your post over again, in case I think of something else to do.

 

PS; Does your machine try to boot Windows at all, and if so, how far along does it get before it fails?

PS2: In amongst those MBR commands, there is one that actually builds a new MBR. Did you see it while you were in there?

I remember a computer that wouldn't boot and nothing was working and I had tried the fixmbr and one or two others, to no avail.

When I used the command REBUILD a new one, that worked like a charm. Perhaps the MBR was too badly busted to be repairable.


Edited by rockysosua, 12 September 2014 - 04:20 PM.

All is well in Paradise.

#3 stantech

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 06:52 AM

The computer does boot to the windows screen and stays there for a minute or 2 before the BSOD.



#4 Jared44

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 07:38 AM

Interesting.

Is there a possibility of uploading a Kernel dump file so I can identify the cause of the crash?

 

Go the Start
Right click My Computer
Select Properties
Click Advanced system settings
Click on the Advanced tab
Select Settings under Startup and Recovery
Then under Write debugging information select Kernel memory dump.

Once a dump is created go to:

C:\Windows\memory.dmp

Copy the file to the desktop, zip it up and upload it to a file sharing site like Onedrive. After the upload is done post the download link in your next reply.

#5 rockysosua

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 08:37 AM

If I had your computer in front of me with the same resources you have, that is to say the capacity to hook your hard drive up to another computer and access to a Win 7 installation disc, there is no doubt in my mind that I'd be backing up the data and installing a new system.

You've gone the distance. Beyond what you have already done, is not time or cost effective.

Unless you have a costly program on your present system that you can't possibly get again without paying a ghastly fee, then it's time for a fresh install.


All is well in Paradise.

#6 Jared44

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:14 AM

Due to the nature of 0xc000021As and 0xF4 bugchecks they can be very difficult to analyse as we can't normally get access to the dump files.

In my experience with these bugchecks there are usually two main causes.

 

A failing hard disk which is stopping the critical process (usually the Windows Subsystem) perform work and terminate when it can't get resources or we have severe OS corruption.

I have seen cases where a program is leaking memory causing the critical process the crash as it can't use any other memory and hence the 0xF4/0xC000021A.






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