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I deleted all of my partitions


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#1 Raphs

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:29 PM

A few months ago, I had Windows 8 as the only operative system on my computer and I wanted to install Ubuntu, having both operative systems on my pc (dual boot). However, after supposedly installing Ubuntu, I wanted both Ubuntu and Windows 8 to appear on the screen when booting (so I could choose which one I wanted to work with), and that's when the problem appeared... in the terminal, I followed a tutorial that could make the dual boot work (I don't remember what I wrote) and, all of a sudden, all of my partitions were gone. I initiated the computer again and it would go straight to the BIOS. Then, after several tries, I somehow installed Ubuntu and have been working on it since. However, I know that all of my partitions are messed up and now that I need both Windows and Ubuntu on my pc, I want to delete the current Ubuntu that I have and start working on the computer like it didn't have any operative systems (install both Windows and Ubuntu from scratch). I really appreciate any help that you can give.

I attached a print screen of gparted, which shows all of the partitions on the computer.

 

KG9kqBw.png?1



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:40 PM

 

However, I know that all of my partitions are messed up

Yes all your partitions are gone. Ubuntu is installed correctly including the efi partition and swap, Congratulations on a perfect Linux install.

 

 

need both Windows and Ubuntu on my pc,

 

 

 

You will need to start again, Make sure you install Windows first then Ubuntu . Please read the tutorial on how to dual boot windows 8 and Ubuntu.

 

Guide To Install Ubuntu 14.04 In Dual Boot Mode With Windows 8 Or 8.1 UEFI

 

If you have any other questions please feel free to ask

 

:welcome:  to BC


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 05:41 PM.


#3 Raphs

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 05:57 PM

Thank you so much for the help. I do actually have another question... Before installing both Windows and Ubuntu (following the tutorial you suggested), I want to erase everything from the computer (I just transfered all the files that I need to an external disk, so it doesn't matter if I lose what I currently have on the pc). On some other forum, a person suggested I should write the following on the terminal of Ubuntu:
 
Spoiler

 
Should I do this?

Edit: Potentially damaging command hidden by spoiler. Do not attempt to perform them unless you are sure of what you are doing or can afford a catastrophic system loss.~ Animal

Edited by Animal, 11 September 2014 - 06:13 PM.


#4 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 06:04 PM


 

Should I do this?

No. That command will just overwrite your hard drive with useless infornation Its a format command.

 

I have never installed Windows 8, However It's just another operating system so I assume that if you place your Windows 8 install disk in your DVD drive and reboot your pc that Windows 8 installer will take over and do all the partitioning and install Windows for you.

 

 

Members are advised to not run any Linux commands if they do not know what it will do regardless of who tells you to run that command

 

 

 

EDIT

 

Thank you Animal


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 06:18 PM.


#5 Raphs

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 07:19 PM

Okay, thank you so much for the help.

 

I have another question, which may seem a little ignorant, but I really need to understand what those partitions mean. For example, what does /dev/sda1 mean? And fat32? And so on... It's just that when I look at the image I posted, I sincerely don't understand what I'm seeing/analyzing. Sorry for the total ignorance, but I really need to have those concepts clear.



#6 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 07:26 PM

 

, what does /dev/sda1 mean? And fat32? And so on.

/dev/sda1 is the first partition on your Hard Drive or the Boot partition, In Windows speak its the MBR.

 

BootPartition - Community Help Wiki

 

/dev/sda2

This is where Linux is installed. In windows speak this is the C Drive.

 

/dev/sda3

This is the Linux swap partition.

All about Linux swap space | Linux.com

 

fat32?

 

Comparison of file systems - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Confused yet?


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 07:29 PM.


#7 Raphs

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 07:39 PM

So, if I want to install Windows, I should install it on /dev/sda2, right?

 

And as you know, I want to reinstall Ubuntu from scratch (because it's quite slow). What should I do on the partitions before starting the installation of both Windows and Ubuntu (through the tutorial you previously suggested)?



#8 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:01 PM


 

So, if I want to install Windows, I should install it on /dev/sda2, right?

Do not worry about any of that the Windows installer will delete all that and create its own partitions. Just follow the prompts. Then install Ubuntu along side like in the tutorial I gave you above. I am just assuming this for Windows as all decent operating systems( Linux being the only OS) will do the same if you do a clean install and use the whole disk.

http://youtu.be/21cJv5GQlHo

 

 

 

OMG I am helping somebody install windows BC will never be the same again :hysterical:


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 08:08 PM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:40 PM

 

 

So, if I want to install Windows, I should install it on /dev/sda2, right?

 

And how do we fix the Linux install to boot if the Windows install overwrites GRUB?

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:46 PM


 

And how do we fix the Linux install to boot if the Windows install overwrites GRUB?

You cant, Using 1 HDD. The Op has Ubuntu installed on the HDD, The first thing the Op needs to do is install Windows 8, During this process the entire disk will be formated deleting the Ubuntu install and the boot partition, Windows will then create its own as needed. After Windows is installed, You install Ubuntu along side Windows as you like , There is no other easy way to do this. Its a total format and start again. It's also the best and fastest option.

 

EDIT

 

Windows must always be installed first in a dual boot with Linux Using 1 HDD.  I have read of ways to install Windows second however  I do not understand some of it.( most to be honnest)


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 09:32 PM.


#11 cat1092

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 09:22 PM

It can be done if there's two drives in the computer, simply disconnect the Linux one during install. 

 

And EasyBCD 2.2 actually gives the Linux install an option in the Windows bootloader.

 

 

 

For example, what does /dev/sda1 mean? And fat32? 

 

Raphs, Welcome to BC Forums!  :)

 

The FAT32 partition is one required by Windows on OEM Windows 8 installs, there's two or three small ones before the actual install, to include one which is totally blank (wonder who thought of that one?), all of which are needed during the reinstall. If by chance you are reinstalling by recovery media ( :thumbsup: for creating it, many doesn't), all of this will take place. 

 

Ubuntu can then be installed after shrinking some space from the Windows partition, though I recommend to update the Windows install first, making sure that drivers are updated before the OS, if there are any to update. As I understand it, the latest Ubuntu LTS releases has a key so that Secure Boot can be retained, though I haven't personally tried this, as I also have Windows 7, which doesn't work with Secure Boot. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 NickAu

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 09:27 PM

 

It can be done if there's two drives in the computer, simply disconnect the Linux one during install.

Spot on Cat,

 

Ubuntu can then be installed after shrinking some space from the Windows partition, though I recommend to update the Windows install first, making sure that drivers are updated before the OS, if there are any to update.

Also a defrag is needed before shrinking the partition. We all know how windows is with fragmentation

 

I am working on the asumption that there is only 1 physical drive in the pc due to the screenshot in the first post.

 

Sorry if there was any misunderstanding.


Edited by NickAu1, 11 September 2014 - 09:55 PM.


#13 cat1092

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 10:19 PM

Yes I forgot about the defrag, my bad. It's better than it used to be. If needed, one can always download & install the 30 day trial of Perfect Disk by Raxco, this will really organize the drive good. I recommend it to anyone who gets a new computer & intends on keeping the OEM HDD, to get it in top shape. 30 days is plenty of time. Uninstall when the Trial time is up. I do the same with Revo Uninstaller Pro to totally remove junk software the OEM's installs. Note that the following link is for a Trial, no obligation to purchase anything. 

 

http://download.raxco.com/perfectdisk-pro

 

It may be best to check for driver updates only, then defrag & shrink space, before a lot of files are written. Though for Windows, there's a neat, power tool in Mini Tool Partition Wizard that can be downloaded & installed, this will shrink a partition where the built in Windows Disk Management can't. There's also a bootable CD or Flash drive available, though Secure Boot *may* need to be disabled for these to work. But the installed software should, regardless. Choose how much to shrink & click Apply, a reboot will be needed & it'll do it's thing. Though if a lot of space is needed, spread it out over two times. Ubuntu doesn't need a ton of space, unless one intends to run virtual machines. Even so, 100GB should be plenty for most anyone. 

 

http://www.partitionwizard.com/free-partition-manager.html

 

Use this only if not enough space can be gained through Windows Disk Management. It does work, I can vouch for that, and Windows will still boot fine. It's still best to defrag first, regardless of option chosen. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 11 September 2014 - 10:20 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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