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To add RAM or not to add RAM that is the question


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#1 NooseLadder

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 06:06 AM

Hi,

 

I hope I have got the right section to post in?

 

I have a desktop pc that is running slowly generally. It's mainly used for internet and the web pages load slowly. There is also a problem with playing videos eg from YouTube in Chrome - the CPU maxes out at 100%, but in IE it does not and videos play ok.

 

I am not sure if additional RAM will help. Here is the basic spec:

 

CPU - AMD Athlon 64 3500+ (single core)

OS - Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1

RAM - DDR2 4 slots total, 1 free, total physical 2GB, available physical 1.05GB, total virtual 4GB, available virtual 2.31GB

GRAPHICS - NVIDIA GeForce 210

HARD DRIVE - 149GB, free space 107GB

 

Please let me know if you need any more info.

 

Thanks.

 

 



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 07:21 AM

Adding more RAM would probably help.  It would reduce the amount of virtual memory in use and is likely to make the PC feel a bit quicker overall.  The CPU 100% in Chrome is not likely to be anything to do with memory, IMO and could have a number of causes.  Chrome uses a proprietary plugin to handle Flash video's and this might be why you are seeing different behaviour in Chrome compared to IE.

 

Against performing a memory upgrade, the PC is quite dated now.  The single core Athlon64's have not aged well and IMO are likely to struggle with even basic desktop duties with modern software.

 

Here's a basic benchmark comparison between a couple of current low end (sub $60) processors against an Athlon 64 3500+.  Clearly it is way behind.

 

So the question I would have is do you put more money into it for a small improvement or would it make more sense to upgrade more substantially.


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#3 Scoop8

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 07:30 AM

Hi,

 

My experience with RAM is that generally, "the more, the better" but that's not always possible to expand RAM as it will depend on your Mother Board and CPU's capacity for RAM expansion.

 

I have a component-built Desktop PC that was built with 8G RAM and I figured that would be all I'd need as I'm not a PC "gamer" and am basically an average PC user, e-mail, browser, etc.

 

However, I use my Optical Drives frequently for burning media and I found that adding another 8G RAM to my PC made a significant difference in overall PC speed and response times.

 

With Windows 7, you're at the minimum requirement for Win 7 x64 operation 2G so, if you can expand your RAM capacity, I'd recommend 4G minimum with 8G preferred but that's just my opinion based on my experiences.

 

[edit]

 

I just read jonuk76's post.  That's a good point, whether it's worth investing additional funds into your Desktop PC with the older CPU.

 

If you can expand your RAM, it may be worth it vs the expense of a new PC.  RAM prices have decreased over the past few years so that may help with the decision.


Edited by Scoop8, 11 September 2014 - 07:33 AM.


#4 NooseLadder

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:03 AM

Ok Thanks you both for your input. 

 

@jonuk76 What do you mean by a substantial upgrade. What options are there; new pc, change motherboard etc. What would the most economic option be?



#5 jonuk76

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 08:54 AM

Either of those options could apply really.  It depends on what you have now, like whether it's a proprietary system (Dell, HP etc.) which may be difficult to upgrade, or one that uses standard parts.  And of course whether you like the idea of opening up a PC and replacing components.

 

For example, assuming it's a standard system, keeping the current video card, HDD's, case etc (making the assumption they are all in decent condition and don't need replacing) you could fit say a Pentium G3258 processor, a motherboard, and 8gb of DDR3 for about $170-180 in parts.  It would cope a lot better with current software.

 

A new PC is fair bit more money but will get you all new parts, warranty etc.


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#6 NooseLadder

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 03:19 AM

Thanks for your help guys. I'm looking into the options.

 

BTW as a bit of fun here's a quote from member Condobloke to compliment the OP title: :cool:

Whether 'tis more efficient in the mind to suffer
The malware and adware of outrageous online malcontents,
Or to take extra ram against a sea of slowness,
And by opposing end them? To die: to bsod;

lolll.....Sorry mate....I just could not resist !!

 



#7 ElfBane

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 04:18 AM

Jonuk76 hit it on the head. With 8GB of RAM and a multi-core processor your bottlenecks would be gone, but your MB may not be upgradable to multi-core.


Edited by ElfBane, 13 September 2014 - 06:38 AM.





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