Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Dad Wants to Protect Computer From Son!!


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Smolenski7

Smolenski7

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:48 AM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 09:28 AM

Hi,

 

My 12 year old son likes to believe he is tech savvy, unfortunately, like most pre-teen middle schoolers he's not aware of the things he doesn't know.  He loves playing online games, watching YouTube videos, and Skyping with friends.  All of that is fine, he's a good kid and can be trusted as much as any 12 year old can be.  However, over the last several months he has started to download various games and other applications to our desktop.  Before this we never had issues with the computer, now we seem to have minor problems once a week, for example the computer will not shut down at night.  The grey shut down screen will appear and that bluish circle with move, but it will not shut down.  This has happened several times.  Once, the printer would not print, not sure why, but it is just another thing in the list of small little problems we've had and I've solved.

 

I'm worried that he's going to do something that will permanently hurt the hard drive, making it so that I loose all or most of the files I have stored on it.  I do back up everything, but I still don't want him to destroy the main hard drive.  What can I do so that he is still able to get on, play his games, download his applications, and Skype with his friends, but not be able to wipe out my important files?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 buddy215

buddy215

  • Moderator
  • 13,323 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Tennessee
  • Local time:09:48 AM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 09:37 AM

Seems you don't want to change anything. If you allow him to still do all that.

In that case the only solution is for him to have his own computer.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 7,011 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:03:48 PM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 05:12 PM

Buddy's suggestion is a good one - then he can be responsible for fixing his own messes ! 

 

However since you may wish to retain some control over his use at the age of 12, why don't you set up a password protected user acount for yourself and one for him. Make yours the lead account and his a secondary one with limited privileges. This will protect your files and the OS from him but still allow him to use his area of the computer.

 

Control panel - User accounts - Manage accounts - Create new account

 

Here you can set permissions and, if you wish, you can also set 'Parental controls'. Just DO NOT let him learn your account password !

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#4 Smolenski7

Smolenski7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:48 AM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 05:52 PM

Buddy's suggestion is a good one - then he can be responsible for fixing his own messes ! 
 
However since you may wish to retain some control over his use at the age of 12, why don't you set up a password protected user acount for yourself and one for him. Make yours the lead account and his a secondary one with limited privileges. This will protect your files and the OS from him but still allow him to use his area of the computer.
 
Control panel - User accounts - Manage accounts - Create new account
 
Here you can set permissions and, if you wish, you can also set 'Parental controls'. Just DO NOT let him learn your account password !
 
Chris Cosgrove


This is what I was thinking. Will this protect the computer from any malware or viruses that he may download? I assume it will protect my settings. Can I allow him to see files but not make changes to him?

#5 HackedBotato

HackedBotato

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:48 AM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:37 PM

No, it will not protect your files. The only way to protect them fully is to use a Virtual Machine, but they're really slow. (Kind of like running Windows on Windows, in a window. It has a separate virtual hard drive that doesn't affect your other files, but it may take up a lot of space and he can't see other files on your PC.).



#6 rockysosua

rockysosua

  • Members
  • 772 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Caribbean
  • Local time:10:48 AM

Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:59 PM

The only real 100% solution for sharing your PC with him, would be a dual boot system.

In other words, you'd buy another hard drive, maybe an SSD, clone your present system to the SSD and then have both installed.

When your son would want to use the PC, he would reboot into his own system that would be 100% isolated from your own.

 

In the event that you decide to get him his own computer, here's a good deal for a 16 inch Dell for $250 or a 12 inch touchscreen Asus for $285.

Neither is a powerhouse, but both work quite well. I've bought a few of each and I found them quite impressive for the price.


All is well in Paradise.

#7 Smolenski7

Smolenski7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:48 AM

Posted 08 September 2014 - 08:00 PM

I made a separate user account for him.  I like the different parental controls, however, I'm having a hard time getting Word to run.  I have Office 2010 installed on my account, but on his account it reverts back to Office 2002.  The product key on the side of the cpu is not it, then I ran a program to find the product key, which found a different key than was is on the sticker, but it didn't work either.

 

Any suggestions on getting Word to run properly on my son's user account?



#8 rockysosua

rockysosua

  • Members
  • 772 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Caribbean
  • Local time:10:48 AM

Posted 08 September 2014 - 08:29 PM

Maybe by uninstalling the old Office program.


All is well in Paradise.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users