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Computer shuts off after a few seconds... but there's a quirk...


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7 replies to this topic

#1 translunar

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 08:56 PM

Hey guys, it's either been years since I've posted here or this is my first post, I can't remember. Hoping you can help with a unique problem I haven't been able to solve.

 

I built a computer 3.5 years ago with a friend and it has treated me amazingly over the years. I had set up a backup hard drive (which may have been USB 3.0, but was 2.0 compatible) and got frustrated with having the unit humming and flashing lights near my desk. It took up space. So I eventually took apart its enclosure and set it up with my given available cables, and then suddenly the computer flipped out. I didn't unplug any cables, I had turned off the power source before doing this, and I even unplugged the drive but the computer continued to have this problem. It worked amazingly (just as well as when we built it) right up until this moment. Now that I've given a background...

 

The Problem: The computer tower will start up for a few seconds. This could be from 3 seconds to maybe even a minute or two. However it always abruptly powers off before the two minute mark. I toyed around with some wire configurations, etc. and found that if I unplugged the cable that powers the CPU, the computer will "run" indefinitely (and by "run" I mean it will have power, run all the lights and fans, but the monitors will remain off). I bought a power supply and it showed up today, it's an upgrade from the previous one so I was excited. I installed everything as efficiently as possible and yet it still shows the same problem. Even if I switch the power cable to the CPU to the extra one, or load either into the other spot, it won't stay powered (however it does provide visuals). It still seems that the computer will run indefinitely if I leave the CPU cable unplugged.

 

My Computer Specs: (Copied from my profile)

  • Operating System
    Windows 7
  • Antivirus Software
    Microsoft Security Essentials
  • Firewall
    Windows Firewall
  • Computer
    Custom
  • CPU
    Intel Core i7-940
  • Motherboard
    MSI X58M
  • Ram
    DDR3 6x 1gb
  • Storage
    Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 72K SATA
  • Video Card
    EVGA GeForce GTX 460 SE
  • Soundcard
    M-Audio Fast Track (through USB)
  • Power Supply
    Cougar DX600
  • Case
    Raidmax Smilodon ATX-612WBP
 
Can anybody give any insight on what is happening? Maybe ideas on a part that has gone bad that needs to be replaced (since replacing the PSU did not fix it)? I'm desperate. I'm a college student and I have online classes, so not only am I broke, but working on this old laptop is taking a strain on me (the keyboard I am using actually sort of hurts my fingers and stresses me out). I should start having money soon to fix this, though (hopefully I won't need any!), so I would love to hear opinions.


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#2 ElfBane

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 04:00 AM

See post#4 of this thread ... http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/545295/serious-hardware-issue/?hl=%2Bbreadboard#entry3455482 .

Start at the second paragraph (though the entire thread is informative).

 

But it appears you have already troubleshot it,,, unfortunately a CPU isn't usually friendly to the wallet.



#3 Wesker1984

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:40 PM

Sounds like the CPU is overheating, is there a lot of dust buildup in the heatsink? If so I would get a can of airduster and give it a good blowout (along with the rest of the PC), if the build is 3 and a half years old as you say then that is likely the problem. I would also get some Thermal Paste and IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol), then remove the Heatsink/Fan assembly from the CPU and using the IPA and a lint-free cloth, clean the old paste away and apply new paste. This will not be a large expense (around £30-40) and if it doesn't work then yes, it's probably your CPU itself, but this is unlikely due to modern (2005 onwards at least, probably earlier than that) CPUs having built in temperature monitoring, hence they cut out (like yours is) to avoid damage.


Edited by Wesker1984, 07 September 2014 - 08:41 PM.


#4 translunar

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 04:02 AM

Thanks for the replies everybody. I have done the breadboarding and it leads to the same problem, either the mobo or the cpu. I was thinking about getting thermal paste, it looks like I can by it from my close-by chain store for $15 so it would definitely not hurt to put a few pennies down on that. My only question is would the cpu really heat up that much in a matter of 30 seconds? And I did check my heatsink, there's really hardly any dust in there. Either way I'm still going to purchase some thermal paste, and if that fails I plan to just buy a more universal chipset cpu/mobo combo since it would only be just a little more money than buying a replacement mobo that will take my cpu.



#5 ElfBane

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 05:18 AM

 My only question is would the cpu really heat up that much in a matter of 30 seconds?

Oh yes! Sometimes the protection circuits will shut it down in 3-5 seconds. I'm surprised it's been lasting a minute!

 



#6 translunar

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 07:15 PM

So I gave the thermal paste a try and it worked! Computer is up and running, and it stays running (which is absolutely incredible to me so thanks for the help guys, saved me possibly hundreds of dollars). Now she's running on a different problem, won't go past the boot-up screen, but I can start a new thread for that if necessary.



#7 ElfBane

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 03:31 AM

So I gave the thermal paste a try and it worked! Computer is up and running, and it stays running (which is absolutely incredible to me so thanks for the help guys, saved me possibly hundreds of dollars). Now she's running on a different problem, won't go past the boot-up screen, but I can start a new thread for that if necessary.

Start a new thread.



#8 jasmeencress

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 06:25 AM

If your CPU overheats, your computer will shut down, not restart. A good indication of if its your CPU is to check your CPU usage under the task manager. If you notice it hits close to 100% before your PC shuts down, then you're right- its your CPU.






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