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ACRONIS - Copy Disk (Vague process)


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#1 pinegum

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 04:59 PM

I have ATX tower with my decktop p.c. with two mobile racks/hard drives. The daily drive I use is the "C" drive. I only use the "D" drive for backing up the "C" drive. When I look at "My Computer" is shows both drive/disks, C & D and the available space left on each. When I run Acronis Copy Disk, the process shows Disk 1 and Disk 2, I'm suppose to pick the "Source" disk for the info I want copied and the "destination" disk for where I want the copied info to go. My problem is that I don't know which drive number, C or D relates to which Disk number 1 or 2?? It's all a guessing game and so far I've been lucky, BUT I sure would hate it if I copied my old data over my new.
 
I'd really appreciate any help on explaining exactly what I should do.
 
Pinegum


Mod Edit: Moved from AII to All other Applications ~~boopme


Edited by boopme, 05 September 2014 - 07:08 PM.


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#2 Scoop8

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 09:15 AM

Hi

 

I use Acronis (2011) for cloning.  You pointed out one of the potential issues that can occur when one is cloning near-identical HDD's.

 

Here's what I do, to eliminate the possibility of cloning in reverse and to make it easy to identify the Source and Target HDD's when using Acronis (or other cloning/imaging software tools):

 

- While in Windows, I connect my Target HDD before launching Acronis or other cloning software.  I use an "Enclosure", which is a SATA/USB Adapter device.

 

In your case, your "D" HDD is already connected to your PC.

 

 

- Launch "Disk Manager" in Windows.  There are a couple of ways to launch the DIsk Mgmt Console.  I like to use the "run" dialog since it bypasses Control Panel or the Start Menu (multiple mouse clicks, etc).

 

 

To launch the Disk Mgmt Console using the "run" dialog,

 

<win>r      (hold down the win key, and press the r key) 

 

You should see the Run dialog box appear on your screen.

 

- In the Run dialog field, enter this:        diskmgmt.msc

 

 

When the DIsk Mgmt Console appears, you'll see all of your attached storage devices listed in the Console.

 

Before proceeding, double-check that you're identifying your "D" HDD in the Console screen before proceeding.  It should be easy since Windows will display your same HDD assignment letters for "C" and "D" HDD's.

 

Note on the left-hand section of the Disk Mgmt screen, you'll see disk numbers assigned to your HDD's.  For example, your "C" HDD will probably be numbered as "disk 0".  Your "D" HDD will probably be numbered as "disk 1".  This information will be a reference if you decide to use "Diskpart"  (mentioned in this post).

 

 

- Right-click on you "D" HDD partition area.  In the right-click menu, click "Delete volume". 

 

If there are other partitions on your "D" HDD, do the same, right-click on that partition area, and delete the volume. **

 

You will see that your "D" HDD now appears as "unallocated", since it contains no partitions.

 

- Exit the Disk Mgmt Console.

 

- Boot up on your Acronis CD.

 

- When you navigate the Acronis Cloning dialog, you'll be able to identify the Source and Target HDD's easily since your Target HDD contains no data and will appear in the Acronis CD software dialog as "unallocated".

 

- Select your Source and Target HDD's.

 

 

With my Acronis 2011 version CD, Acronis will automatically select the Target HDD since it sees that HDD as unallocated. 

 

You'll still see the "verify" screen, allowing the user to cancel before starting the cloning process, if something's not selected correctly.

 

- Start the cloning process.

 

 

** With some PC's, the "recovery" partitions are protected and Windows won't allow you to delete those partitions (volumes) within the Disk Mgmt Console.  If you'd like to delete those partitions prior to cloning, you can use "Diskpart" in CMD mode.

 

DIskpart is a disk utility where you can delete protected or hidden partitions.

 

I use this method with my Toshiba Laptop PC before cloning.

 

Here are a couple of ways to access "Diskpart" :

 

-  Open the Run dialog  <win>r          In the Run dialog field,  enter     diskpart

 

or

 

- Open a CMD window.  One way to do this is to press the "Start" button, and enter   cmd   in the search field.

 

You'll see a black-colored CMD icon among your search results in the Start dialog field.  Right-click on the CMD icon and select "Run as Administrator".

 

Once the CMD window launches,  enter   diskpart

 

 

You should see this appear on your screen:

 

 

Microsoft DiskPart version 6.1.7601
Copyright © 1999-2008 Microsoft Corporation.
On computer: Your_PC_name

 

The system info is in black.  You enter what is in blue :

 

DISKPART> list disk

 

  Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
  --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
  Disk 0    Online          931 GB      0 B
  Disk 1    Online          465 GB      0 B
  Disk 2    Online          465 GB   100 MB

 

DISKPART> select disk 1  (this assumes that your "D" HDD is disk 1.  You can use the DiskMgmt Console screen to verify the HDD number identifications)

 

Disk 1 is now the selected disk.

 

DISKPART> list disk  (I recommend repeating this step to verify that Diskpart has selected your "D" HDD)

 

  Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
  --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
  Disk 0    Online          931 GB      0 B
* Disk 1    Online          465 GB      0 B
  Disk 2    Online          465 GB   100 MB

 

Note the * that indicates Diskpart is indicating what disk is selected.  This is important to verify at this time.

 

DISKPART> clean

 

The "clean" command marks all HDD content for deletion, including "recovery", protected, and hidden partitions.  Your "D" HDD will now appear as "unallocated" in the DIsk Mgmt Console.

 

DISKPART>exit

 



#3 pinegum

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 12:45 PM

Thanks Scoop8,

I'll get busy educating myself on your instructions. Probably going to take a while cause I'm nuts on getting things right.

Pinegum



#4 Scoop8

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 04:17 PM

You're welcome.

 

If your "D" HDD has only one partition with your files/folders, you can accomplish the same thing by opening your PC's "Computer" dialog ("My Computer", etc) . and right-click on the "D" HDD icon, and format the HDD.

 

I use the <win>e  shortcut to open my Computer screen, showing my storage devices.

 

I'm assuming that you are referring to using the Acronis "Copy Disk" as Cloning, but it's not important with regards to pre-deleting the contents of your "D" HDD before booting up on your Acronis CD.

 

The goal is to be able to easily identify your "D" HDD in your Acronis Disk-Copy (or Cloning) setup screens.  The fastest way to do that, in my opinion. is to format or delete the partitions on the Target HDD.

 

If you're using the "Disk and Partition backup" option in Acronis, it would be faster just to format the "D" HDD while in Windows (before you reboot to your Acronis CD).



#5 pinegum

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 02:43 PM

Hi Scoop, I thought I had a foolproof way to do this. I bought a 1T HDD since the the volume of this drive would always be larger that the 500GB drives I'm using now. (Total volumes always show during the disk copy routine.) Although the 1T HDD is a bit thicker than the 500GB HDD it seamed to go into the mobile rack just fine. During the boot process I got a message saying the device driver on the 1T HDD installed correctly,  After boot-up I went to "My Computer" and guess what. The 1T HDD doesn't show up????

Any ideas on what's going on??

 

Thanks for your patience..



#6 Scoop8

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 06:39 PM

Hi

 

From the description of your situation, I'd try this:

 

Open Disk Management Console.  See my earlier Post #2 on how to do this.

 

In the DIsk Mgmt Console screen, look at the left-hand column where your storage devices are numbered,  Disk 0,1,2 ,etc.

 

You should see your new 1Tb HDD listed in the left-hand column.   You may see where DIsk Mgmt is telling you that the HDD isn't initialized.  Whether or not that information is indicated, right-click on the disk icon, where it will indicate your disk # for your 1Tb HDD.

 

In the right-click pull-down menu, see if there's a choice for "Initialize disk".  If so, click on that choice.

 

New HDD's need to be initialized before Windows will recognize them in "My Computer" and before you can create partitions, etc.

 

Windows may have already initialized your 1Tb HDD since it installed the Drivers at bootup.  It's been a long time since I've installed and initialized a new HDD so I don't recall what my PC did at that time. 

 

I do know that I've not always had to do a manual Initialization from the Disk Mgmt Console.  Sometimes Windows does that automatically upon recognition of a new HDD.

 

I was helping someone out recently with the Acronis Cloning procedure and he had just installed new HDD's on 2 PC's.  With one of his PC's, his new HDD initialized automatically and with the other PC, he needed to initialize the HDD with the Disk Mgmt Console.

 

Another thing I'd check in the same left-hand column area below the 1TB HDD icon, is whether the HDD is "online".  That should be indicated in that area.

 

The HDD will appear in "My Computer" when there's a partition (volume) present on the HDD.

 

 

It sounds like you have the same mobile racks that I have in my Desktop PC.  They're sometimes referred to as "Hot-Swap" Racks.  They're one of the best hardware accessories that I've installed in my Desktop PC.  It makes Cloning and (test-restoring) Imaging very convenient for me.

 

 

I have a question since I'm curious as an Acronis user myself:

 

When you're using the "Disk Copy" function in Acronis, are you referring to the "Clone Disk" function or are you performing a different option within Acronis?

 

You're welcome for any help I can provide.


Edited by Scoop8, 13 September 2014 - 06:58 PM.


#7 pinegum

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:19 PM

The new disk is "0" unallocated volume 931.51. In diskmgmt screen No option is presented for formatting. What I do get is "Convert to dynamic disk", "Convert to GPT disk", "New simple volume". It shows the device is working properly but I can't find anywhere to format the darn thing. I'm using windows 7 and my Acronis is 2013. I'm going to try to attach a pic of the diskmgmt screen I get. It's too bad I'm such a dunce when it comes routine computer workings.

Any more suggestions would be appreciated.

Pinegum (maybe the attachment??) Guess Not..........:-(

 

 

 

 



#8 Scoop8

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:51 PM

Hi

 

Nope, you're not a dunce :)   Believe me, a few years ago, I didn't know a cloned HDD from a Star Wars clone :).

 

 

I'll try to help further.

 

In order to see your new HDD in "My Computer", you need to create a "simple volume".  You can do that in Disk Mgmt by selecting that choice.  Windows will ask you for a driver letter, D.E.F.G, etc.

 

Select a letter that you're not currently using for your other HDD's or storage devices.

 

Here's an example:

 

On the Disk Mgmt screen, right-click on the long rectangular section where it says "unallocated".

 

You should see a pull-down menu appear. 

 

In that pull-down menu, select "New Simple Volume".

 

You'll see the "Simple Volume Wizard" dialog box appear.

 

Click "Next".

 

You'll see the Volume Size dialog appear.  Use the automatic selections unless you want to customize the volume size.

 

Click "Next".

 

Assign an unused drive letter for your new HDD, a drive letter that you're not currently using.

 

Click "Next".

 

This screen is where Windows will format your HDD.  Use the default settings, NTFS file system, and "quick" format.

 

You're done.

 

Now, your HDD will appear in "My Computer" and you can add folders, files, etc.

 

 

If you're copying your "C" HDD to this new HDD, you don't need to create any volume (partition).  I'm assuming that you're using the Acronis "clone" utility to make a complete bootable spare HDD from your "C" HDD.

 

I haven't used a lot of Acronis's tools.  It's got a lot of tool options.  I use it mainly for cloning and imaging my HDD's.

 

I also run a twice-daily unattended specific-item backup using Acronis for a few items that I update or are changed frequently.


Edited by Scoop8, 16 September 2014 - 02:54 PM.


#9 pinegum

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 05:52 PM

Your instructions worked great! I did my backup to the new HDD and it all went fine. Acronis still doesn't make it easy. Changes drive numbers, volume numbers, disc numbers etc. Have to go very carefully to get it right. So far o.k.  I found out you can clone a larger HDD to a smaller HDD. Guess it all depends on the free space.

I am using the "clone disk" option in the Acronis 2013.

I used to use the "Hot Swap" mobile racks, Kingwin. After a while I had to replace them cause the fans or the tray covers started making noise. (Probably bought couple dozen over the years) I'm now using the Kingwin KF-1000-BK, trayless mobile racks. Just slip your HDD right into the door and the closing process snugs the HDD into place. Seems to run cooler as well.

 

Again, Thanks so much for your help, be well!!

 

Pinegum, (So. Calif)



#10 Scoop8

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 06:55 PM

You're welcome, glad you got it to work.

 

If you're cloning with Acronis, there's no need to create a partition, assign a drive letter, on the Target HDD.

 

If you have 2 identically-sized HDD's, and are using the "automatic" cloning option in Acronis, the process is fairly straightforward, with the exception of your point of identifying the Source and Target HDD's in the Acronis cloning setup dialog screens, which is a good point.

 

It can be confusing, when booting into the Acronis media, since the program, loaded into RAM, will assign disk #'s that can appear to be random.  For example, as you pointed out earlier, your "C"  HDD may be assigned as Disk 2, and the Target HDD may be DIsk 1.

 

If you pre-delete the partitions on the Target HDD, then the Source and Target HDD recognition will be easy since your Target HDD will be empty (unallocated).

 

I think some of the confusion may be due to not being aware of the following point:

 

- It's not necessary to pre-format, or create a driver letter, on the Target HDD before cloning.  The cloning process will copy all content, including partition tables, file format system, and the Master Boot Record to the Target HDD.

 

This is the reason I always prepare my Target HDD by deleting the partitions before booting onto the Acronis CD and cloning.  You can clone without doing that step but with an "Enclosure" or hot-swap rack, it's easy to pre-delete the Target HDD partitions which will eliminate any confusion when the Acronis CD boots up and you're selecting the Source and Target HDD's.

 

Since I'm cloning periodically (every 2 weeks on my Desktop PC) with 2 identical  1tb Seagate HDD's, I prefer to make it easy (pre-deleting the Target HDD data) instead of looking at the HDD Serial # information in the Acronis cloning dialog screens.

 

 

The main thing is to avoid booting into Windows with 2 identical HDD's attached to the PC.  That can cause "Disk signature" conflict issues which can get complicated to resolve.

 

 

Kingwin KF-1000 racks: I have 2 of those installed in my Desktop PC as well.  They're working very well for me after 3 years of use.

 

Hope you stay well too :)






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