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Left Half of Monitor Cloned


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#1 AmyBeddoes

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 10:08 PM

So, I am getting probably the weirdest error I have ever gotten. I put my laptop to sleep, and when I pulled it back up, the right half of my monitor had been replaced with my left, with a large white box in the middle. Both halves completely match each other down to mouse movement, and the computer otherwise functions. As this not only persists through reboots but affects the bootup screen itself, I think it is a problem with the monitor itself. Can I do anything to fix this, or is it just completely dead?

I have a Samsung running Windows 7, using the laptop's default monitor. It is a Samsung Ultrabook, model number is listed as System SKUNumber? I am not sure where to look for more information about my monitor but that the hardware properties calls it a "Generic PnP monitor" on the Intel HD Graphics Family. Driver is version 6.1.7600.16385 and attempts to update it have told me it is up to date.

I have literally no idea what could be doing this, so, uh, help would be great. Thanks.

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#2 ElfBane

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 12:11 PM

Try your lappy with an external monitor and let us know if the fault still happens. Be aware that when you hook up the external monitor you will probably have to make some sort of FN key stroke combination for the external monitor to work. That process can be found in your documentation.



#3 AmyBeddoes

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 04:40 PM

I was finally able to get access to an external monitor today. The external monitor is fully functional with no display issues - the issue seems to be confined entirely to the laptop's built-in monitor.



#4 ElfBane

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 06:41 AM

Now it gets complicated. I need the complete model #, and if available, the serial #, of the lappy. There should be sticker on the bottom of the lappy giving model and/or serial numbers. I need these to attempt to locate a teardown of the laptop, because you'll be doing that if you wish to attempt this repair yourself.

 

So you'll know what we're looking at, there are 3 or 4 things that could be at fault;

1. The screen itself.  They are usually around $70-$100 in price.

2. The inverter. A small part, not very expensive usually, but it's usually not the failed part. But it's in the signal path and must be considered.

3. The wiring harness. If it's crimped, bent or partially broken, it can cause odd problems.

4. The mainboard. Usually quite expensive, and very challenging to replace if you've never done it before.

 

A PC shop would charge $250-$400 to troubleshoot and repair this. You can do it cheaper, but it won't be fast. You'll be ordering one-part-at-a-time, changing it in the lappy, then seeing if it's fixed. If it turns out to be the mainboard, then you've ordered those other parts for nought.

 

So, your options are,

A. Fix it yourself. Cheaper in the long run and you'll get a wealth of experience tearing down a lappy, but it won't be fast.

B. Let a PC shop fix it, at the above mentioned estimate.

C. Apply any monies mentioned toward a new lappy, instead of trying to fix the old one.

 

Let us know.






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