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Fried PSU?


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#1 sanpt7777

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:25 AM

I just joined the forum as I plan on building a computer from scratch as a learning process and with a good performing PC as a result, but I had to chime in earlier due to a problem with a computer I have.
I lend my dad this PC because he needed a computer for a new employee of his about a year ago.
A couple of days ago I was at the office and saw it lying there unused, so I asked the girl (the one my dad gave the computer to) if she didn't needed it anymore. She told me she didn't because the motherboard was dead, or at least that's what the guy who fixes the computers there said. It seemed mysterious to me since I gave them the computer working perfectly.
I took it anyway and at one point realized the red switch in the back was set to 230. I recall setting it to 115 when it was new (where I live we use 120V outlets) and I'm pretty sure the computer failed due to human error (stupidity).

What are the chances of making it work again? Maybe the motherboard is indeed dead, but the root of this problem I'm pretty sure was the PSU. Maybe more components are damaged? I'll share a pic of the setting I found the PC in when I got it back.

Thanks on advance everybody.

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#2 ElfBane

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 04:19 AM

No bad power should have gotten past the PSU safety circuits. And you may just be able to set it back to 115 and have it work. Also, inspect the PSU for a popped circuit breaker or blown fuse. Be CAREFUL, dangerous voltages are present!!



#3 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 09:07 AM

Many cheap OEM power supply's might not have any safety circuits at all.

A while back there were some Gateway pc's with the Bestec power supply, it was notorious for frying the pc's motherboard.



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 09:22 AM

If the power supply was set to 220 most likely no damage was done and the machine works just as it did when reconnected.  I'd suggest plugging it in and testing to see if the computer works and then proceed from there.



#5 dc3

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 10:53 AM

The bottom line here is if the receptacle has 110V AC @ 60Hz it will not matter which voltage the PSU is switched to.  It will only see 110V.

 

In the United States you need two separate busbars with 110V on each to produce 220V.  In most European countries the line voltage is 230V, this is where you need the 220V switch position.


Edited by dc3, 01 September 2014 - 10:59 AM.

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#6 sanpt7777

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:04 PM

image_zps0a6d4467.jpg

Thanks guys that's exactly what I considered doing, switching it back and trying to turn it on but wasn't sure.
I attached an image of the position of the switch as I found it. I'm pretty sure that a visible 230 means it's set to 230, but just to double check, isn't it the other way around? (Visible 230 means it's set to 115?)

#7 dc3

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:45 PM

The voltage you see is what is running.  In the picture you posted it is set to 230V.


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#8 Kilroy

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:47 PM

In the power supplies I have worked with, they operate exactly as you describe.  If you see 230, that is the voltage it is set to accept.



#9 sanpt7777

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 01:28 PM

All right, I plugged it set to 115V. The "ASPIRE" logo lit up and the fan started running. The computer started doing loud intermittent sounds (like a hard disc drive working) but nothing showed up on the screen. I got to tell you though, all of this the computer did on its own. I never pressed the 0/I button to start it. It started on its own. It finally stopped and I decided to unplug it.

#10 Kilroy

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:57 AM

You can set a machine to automatically restart if it loses power, this is most likely why it started when you connected it.  The sound may be either the hard drive or an internal fan.  Does the machine have more than one VGA connector?  If this is the case, move the monitor connection to the other connector.



#11 sanpt7777

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 05:02 PM

Yes it sounded like a HDD but way louder. I'll start it again and see what happens. I haven't updated info because I had no time, but as soon as I get home I'll check it out. Thanks man

You can set a machine to automatically restart if it loses power, this is most likely why it started when you connected it.  The sound may be either the hard drive or an internal fan.  Does the machine have more than one VGA connector?  If this is the case, move the monitor connection to the other connector.



#12 sanpt7777

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 04:54 PM

I tried again a couple of times, I think there is no problem with the PSU. The computer stays on and is no longer making noises, but nothing appears on the screen. I think it will not be an easy task to replace that motherboard, maybe I can use the old components that are in good shape (DVD, hard disc drives, RAM, etc, etc) on the build I'm planning on doing and just get new components and case. Maybe use an APU to lower cost?




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