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HD failure - your opinion?


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#1 LynnBR

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 11:36 AM

Working on a laptop for a friend. HP G72, Windows 7 Home Premium. 3 GB RAM. Said his wife was using it, stepped away, when she came back there was a 'different screen, blue with lots of text'. BSOD error is 0x00000050, indicating ntfs.sys. Parameters vary slightly with each crash. I swapped out RAM, same BSOD. Tried booting to DVD for recovery, gets so far and then same BSOD. Removed HD, connected to Win XP3 system via USB, locked up system. Connected HD to Win 7 Pro SP1, 64 bit - got dialog box that there were errors in some files with options, but before I could even read the entire box, that computer crashed, again with 0x50 ntfs.sys BSOD.

 

Is there anything else I can try, or do you agree that their HD is toast?

 

Thanks for the input.



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#2 zingo156

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 11:47 AM

I would test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility such as seatools, MHDD, or spinrite. I will post instructions for MHDD below in a new post. I would recommend having only that 1 disk connected to the computer (directly not USB) and then running the test. Just put the disk back in the laptop and create the bootable disc.

 

If MHDD or bios do not recognize the disk, you may be out of luck. As far as data recovery goes, if data is important, try to recover data first before running diagnostics. Diagnostics can potentially cause a failing drive to completely fail, it would be rare but who knows...

Since you have already tried to view the drive on windows xp and 7 with no luck, you could try a bootable version of linux something like linux mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php and then try to copy data to an external hard drive from within linux

 

If windows nor linux can copy the data from the drive then potentially running MHDD with re-map enabled could fix the disk enough to get some of the data. I can go into this later if data is needed and linux fails.


Edited by zingo156, 27 August 2014 - 11:50 AM.

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#3 zingo156

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 11:49 AM

Here are the instructions for MHDD, I am not sure if you can even change the bios sata operation in that laptop, if you can not, you will have to pull the drive and put it in a computer that you can change bios sata operation options.

 

If a hard drive has a smart status warning or the drive is questionable this test may be of use NOTE this test does not work with AHCI or Raid sata operation. It must be done with IDE, ATA, or compatibility mode:

 

Before running this test it would be a good idea to backup any data that you cannot afford to lose. This test uses the hard drive at 100%. If the drive is failing or has problems it is possible for the drive to fail suddenly especially during heavy use as this test will do. It is unlikely but still I recommend backing files up to be safe. Here are the instructions to run the test:

 

The first step will be to burn MHDD to a disc as an image (cd preferably). MHDD Can be found here: http://hddguru.com/software/2005.10.02-MHDD/  Click the Last version of MHDD, CDROM iso-image download and burn this file directly to a disc.

 

TO CHANGE SATA OPERATION: (You may need to use your keyboard arrow keys and enter key if you can not click to change settings).

After burning the disc, restart the laptop and start tapping f2 or f1 or delete right away to get into the bios. There you should see System Configuration, expand that by clicking the + button (or using your arrow keys and enter key). In that list there should be something called Sata operation. (Sata Operation may also be by itself in that first screen list)

Click on sata operation and take note of the current setting to the right it will probably be set to AHCI it will need to be switched back to this after MHDD is done running. Select ATA, compatibility or ide mode and then click apply. Save and exit the bios, or if apply was the only option you can use Ctrl+Alt+Delete to restart.

COMMON BOOT MENU/BIOS keys: https://support.fixmestick.com/hc/en-us/articles/201577043-How-to-get-to-your-Boot-Menu-or-your-BIOS-settings

 

Now with the burned disc in the drive after a restart, start tapping (F12 Dell, Toshiba, Lenovo), (F9 HP), or (Esc HP, Samsung, Sony) on the keyboard (or change your boot options to boot to cd/dvd first). This will bring up the boot options menu. Select cd/dvd/cd-rw drive and hit enter.

If this worked correctly and booted to mhdd you should see a screen that says Microsoft windows 98 startup menu. You can let the timer run out or just hit enter on option (2 . Start computer without SCSI support).

 

Now you should see a screen with numbers, most of these will not have any device listed behind them but one number should for example on my dell computer number 6 has WDC WD1600BEVT-75A23T0… and at the end a number in white which is the size of the drive.

Example: If your drive is a 500gb I would expect that number in white to be somewhere around 500,107,862,016 or close to. Find the correct drive to test then on the keyboard type the number in front of the drive (in my case it was 6) and then hit enter.

 

Now you should have a screen with MHDD> and a blinking cursor.

Now hit F4 on the keyboard 2 times and this will start scanning the hard drive.

You should be able to see the computer start scanning, each block represents 255 sectors (130560 bytes) on the hard drive. What we are looking for will show up on the right side of the screen.

There is a list on the right which shows numbers:

<3

<10

<50

<150ms

Etc…

 

Anything below the <150ms is a slow sector or a problem sector. Slow sectors <500 or >500 will slow down the computer. If there are a lot of these one after another (several 1000 or more) the drive should probably be replaced. Also if you have any at the end that were marked as UNC this means the drive has uncorrectable errors and the hard drive should probably be replaced.

Basically if you have any sectors that are below <150 (green) let me know and if possible the total number of them.

 

If all of the sectors were ok and fell within the range of:

<3

<10

<50

<150ms

Then the hard drive is ok, if there are only a few that are slow <500 or >500 the hard drive should be ok to use.

 

NOTE: that if there are many slow sectors one after another or you start having error after error the drive is in bad shape and I recommend ending the test. To end the test hit the Esc key.

 

After you are done testing you will need to go back into the bios by restarting the computer and tapping F2, F1, Delete (or whatever key gets you into bios). Go back to Sata Operation and change it back to the default which probably was AHCI.

Then restart and the computer should boot again.

(If you are getting a blue screen and the computer restarts go back into the bios and confirm that Sata Operation is set to what it was before changing it to IDE, ATA, or compatibility).


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#4 LynnBR

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 11:36 AM

Zingo156,

Thanks for the info. Sorry for delayed reply, didn't get a chance to go back in and check yesterday. Never received notification of reply but have edited my profile, hopefully for the better. I won't have a chance to try this today and then will be offline until next week. Didn't want you to think I was ignoring you! I do appreciate the input. I'll let you know after I have a chance to try things.



#5 Wesker1984

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 09:51 PM

You could also try burning and using a Hirens disc, which contains many useful utilities including HDD health checks, download link: http://www.tomsguide.com/us/download/Hiren-s-Boot-CD,0301-51033.html



#6 LynnBR

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 11:21 PM

Zingo156, I finally made time to deal with the laptop. I was able to boot to Linux and save files, a good start! As you suspected, there was no option in this BIOS to change SATA setting. However, there was a hard disk diagnostic test in BIOS. It came back as good hard drive. Hmmph. When the system booted, one of the options was to repair startup files.  Figuring I had nothing to lose, I started it on its merry way. When I came back a while later, it had booted to Windows and was waiting for login. It had previously blue screened immediately after POST. Don't know what finally woke it up, but it now seems quite happy. And so am I!

 

Wesker1984, I will keep that in mind.

 

Thanks to both!






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