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Heads up when buying and installing laptop internal jacks


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#1 zingo156

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 09:50 AM

I have never had any trouble in the past with buying and installing jacks using exact model/part numbers until yesterday. Generally you can tell if it is not the same part, it won't fit, the connectors are different etc. The solder in jacks are very straight forward, either they will fit and work or they will not.

 

This is more related to jacks that use a cord and plastic connector to the motherboard. I replaced a jack in a Yoga 13 Lenovo laptop with this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-POWER-JACK-w-CABLE-LENOVO-IDEAPAD-YOGA-13-TOUCH-MOCHA2-145500054-145500046-/400726901684?pt=Laptop_Adapters_Chargers&hash=item5d4d2f43b4

 

It was identical by part number, the connection piece was the same and it all fit perfectly. Unfortunately the wiring was reversed meaning whoever made the jack reversed the positive and negative leads, the wires were wrapped so you could not see what went where without unwrapping which I did do a little too late. Who would guess to compare a new jack to the original when part numbers match? Well me from now on. After I installed the jack and powered on the machine when the power adapter was plugged in, the computer instantly shut off and fried the charging circuit on the motherboard, meaning I will be replacing that now as well.

 

Just a fair warning: humans make mistakes, whoever wired this particular jack did it in reverse which ironically is very easy to do by accident, looking into it further, simply wiring with the connector upside down would cause the reverse wiring problem.

 

Double check all wiring before you install a jack even if part numbers match etc. Compare the new part to the original and make certain it is identical or you may end up replacing a motherboard.


Edited by zingo156, 27 August 2014 - 10:51 AM.

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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 06:04 PM

In the case of units with multiple repairs, I've had to resort to using the jack on a pigtail lead.  This eliminates the jamming and yanking of the plug when inserted into the jack, the number one cause for failure.



#3 zingo156

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 07:09 AM

I am not sure how the damage was done it is a clients computer. I am pretty sure it was dropped with the power plug in and landed on that corner. There was a missing screw in that corner and one of the brass fittings where the screw would screw into was torn out of the plastic.


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