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New EMAIL scam


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4 replies to this topic

#1 boopme

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 09:58 AM

If you get one....

##If you don't see it on the CFR website, forward a copy of the email to CFR at
and to the Federal Trade Commission at spam@uce.gov. See below for FTC online complaint forms.
##don't respond to the emails
##don't EVER pay any money or fees
##don't reveal your full identity
##don't reveal any financial or personal information, such as your bank account number, social security number, driver's license number, passport number or credit card details
##don't ever travel to meet them

>>>>>>>>>>>>

You will receive this letter....

Re: You got letter from Kathleen

Dear Sir/Madam,

My name is Kathleen Tierney, the chief operating officer (personal insurance department of the chubb insurance company of Europe S.E). I am writing in respect of a client by name Engr.William F. Abrahamson who perished in the US 9/11/2001 terrorist attack with other passengers aboard as you are aware of this fact or can confirm it yourself.

Since the demise of Engr.William F. Abrahamson i personally have watched with keen interest to see the beneficiary to his masterpiece policyholder but all has proved abortive as no one has reported to claim his benefit of [personal insurance cash accumulation masterpiece policyholder ownership] of total sum amounting to Ј15,860 000.00 [fifteen million eight hundred and sixty thousand British pounds sterling] only existing with the insurance company when added up the following bonus: basic allowance, waiver premium and accidental indemnity which has been with the insurance company for a very long time unclaimed.

On this very note; as no one has come to put up any claim report to our office as regards to the beneficiary to the masterpiece policyholder ownership and the insurance ethic here in UK regulated by the financial service authority (fsa) rules for the conduct of UK business, insurance code and business insurance code standards of which Chubb insurance company is a member of the financial ombudsman scheme does not allow such claim to stay for over more than many years because the company shall have power after a long period of time to discontinue the policy and terminate the insured masterpiece policyholder ownership benefits.

In view of the aforementioned, after i was convinced in my mind that your name can be used as the beneficiary to this masterpiece policy holder ownership claim and as a staff of this company i cannot stand as the beneficiary to this claim.

I therefore propose that 40% of this funds will be for you as a participant in respect of your involvement, compliance and full co-operation towards the successful claimant while 5% will be for any expenses that might be incurred in the process of procuring satisfactory proof documents to be issued in your name legally for back-up to enable Chubb insurance company of Europe S.E pay the lump sums and allowance benefits as set out under the Chubb personal insurance cash accumulation masterpiece policyholder ownership scale of compensation and the rest funds will be for me. Thereafter i will visit you for disbursement of funds. Upon the receipt of your positive reply, i will then inform you the next step to take.

I will not fail to bring to your good notice that this deal is 100% hitchfree as the whole required arrangement has been skillfully perfected for the masterpiece policy holder ownership claim.

My highest considerations and regards even as i await your swift response.

Thank you,
Kathleen Tierney.
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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 05:45 PM

For those of you who do not live in the USA, this is a classic example of the '419' or 'Advanced fee fraud' scam, if written in slightly less florid language than many.

 

And Boopme's advice is spot on, with, if you don't live in the USA, the exception of reporting it to the FTC.

 

The essence of all these scams is that you are offered a significant cash reward for doing some apparently trifling service. In fact, the normal consequence of replying is to rapidly find that your bank account(s) are emptied !  This is not a good idea !

 

As is always the case - don't click on links in e-mails, and don't download attachments if you are not absolutely certain who they are from. Remember - the delete button is your friend.

 

Why '419' scam ?  It is widely believed that this type of e-mail scam originated in Nigeria, and it contravenes Section 419 of the Nigerian Criminal Code - if you must know.

 

Reading e-mails like this will do neither you nor your computer any harm, and can provide some innocent amusement. There is even a web-site devoted to the subject of countering them :

 

http://www.419eater.com/

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 saluqi

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 11:03 PM

A super-classical example of the genre :).  The amusement value is considerable.  Most are less eloquent, and above all less literate :)

 

Over the years I've received many of these.  By what I suppose is pure coincidence one of them arrived bearing the name of a former employee of mine in Nigeria (I was a University professor there,1965-1967).  The man in question was a diligent and personally loyal research assistant who in spite of difficult conditions (the Nigerian civil war, which had driven me from the country) continued to collect and supply me with data, unpaid and on his own initiative, for more than two years after my departure.  Astronomically unlikely, I think, that he then became a scammer - but somebody borrowed his name. Or maybe pure accident - he had a not so terribly uncommon name in Yoruba-land.

 

I have to add, the "419 scams" are not harmless.  People have been lured to Nigeria to collect their supposed money there, and some of them have been murdered.

 

Things have changed in Nigeria.  I had a wonderful and productive time there . . . but I would not go back now.  Too dangerous.  Those who know my life history will probably laugh at that idea, but it's true.  I'm crazy, but not suicidal :).



#4 saluqi

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 11:11 PM

A super-classical example of the genre :).  The amusement value is considerable.  Most are less eloquent, and above all less literate :)

 

Over the years I've received many of these.  By what I suppose is pure coincidence one of them arrived bearing the name of a former employee of mine in Nigeria (I was a University professor there,1965-1967).  The man in question was a diligent and personally loyal research assistant who in spite of difficult conditions (the Nigerian civil war, which had driven me from the country) continued to collect and supply me with data, unpaid and on his own initiative, for more than two years after my departure.  Astronomically unlikely, I think, that he then became a scammer - but somebody borrowed his name. Or maybe pure accident - he had a not so terribly uncommon name in Yoruba-land.

 

I have to add, the "419 scams" are not harmless.  People have been lured to Nigeria to collect their supposed money there, and some of them have been murdered.

 

Things have changed in Nigeria.  I had a wonderful and productive time there . . . but I would not go back now.  Too dangerous.  Those who know my life history will probably laugh at that idea, but it's true.  I'm crazy, but not suicidal :).



#5 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 07:34 PM

 

I have to add, the "419 scams" are not harmless.

 

I couldn't agree more. I have heard of people being lured to Nigeria and other sub-Saharan countries and coming to serious harm but this is a consequence of replying to these scam e-mails. I have also heard of a Canadian citizen who was taken for something like $CA 100,000 before he wised up.

 

By all means, have a laugh at these e-mails, but DO NOT EVER reply to them.

 

Chris Cosgrove






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