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QoS/Bandwidth Control on my DSL Modem/Router


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#1 Invisigoth

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 03:11 PM

Hi,
 
I need somebody's guidance on setting up QoS on the DSL Modem/Router I have. The model is ZXDSL831CII by ZTE and it is controlling and supplying DHCP to wireless connected devices via a TP-LINK WR1043ND router set up as a switch so that all my devices are on the same network instead of two separate networks.
 
Honestly, I don't know how to truly set up QoS but I was able to tweak things around a bit on the TP-LINK to get the desired result when I was using its DHCP server. But then it was two separate networks and I couldn't look inside devices in both directions from the two networks so I had to switch to this current setup.
 
Long story short, could somebody help me setup QoS on my DSL router? I am attaching the screenshots of the QoS setup page along with all the drop down menus.
 
Thanks in advance!
 
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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:18 PM

What do you want to accomplish with the QOS?



#3 Invisigoth

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:04 AM

Yes. I never talked about that. Let me explain. I have more than 10 devices at home. Most of them being smartphones but the computers are still pretty significant. Somerimes somebody would put something on download like torrent on their PC and that sucks away all of the bandwidth making simple things like browsing the internet on a device very slow. And the impact on VoIP like Skype and streaming videos is tremendous.

So I want to be able to set it up to rectify this issue. When somebody is employing bandwidth intensive task on their PC (e.g downloading torrent) and say for e.g I want to talk to somebody on Skype, or somebody who's into gaming and doesn't get sufficient bandwidth, then the QoS gives the latter two the most priority of the bandwidth and decrease the bandwidth on the PC that is downloading the torrent until these important activities are closed.

My ADSL bandwidth is around 4mbps download speed and around 1mbps upload. The details I am attaching as a screenshot.

Attached Files


Edited by Invisigoth, 25 August 2014 - 01:05 AM.


#4 sflatechguy

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 01:33 PM

You would need to know what protocols these games use to set up the QoS properly.

 

In the case of Skype, it relies on UDP (protocol ID). Under applications, you would use RTP. Note that under the DSCP and 802.1p ranges, the higher numbers mean higher priority for that traffic.

 

I don't know enough about your network environment to be able to offer more advice than that. Given how many options you have under QoS, you may want to spend some time with the user manual and/or ZTE tech support on this one.



#5 Invisigoth

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 04:30 PM

Thanks for the response sflatechguy but could you spoon feed me through entering these values and I shall test it out. I mentioned gaming cause my brother plays online games but that doesn't affect the VOIP (Skype, Hangouts, FaceTime) and web browsing as much as torrent does. So I'd like to set the priority as 1. VOIP 2. Web Browsing and 3. Torrent bandwidth for the initial testing phase of the QoS engine.

Furthermore, one thing I don't understand is that on my TPLINK wireless router, I can set a range of IPs and then set the minimum ingress and egress and maximum ingress and egress for desired IPs and that's all and I can get the job done. All of these in reference to the DSL maximum bandwidth which in practice varies and is not ideal but it gets the job done easy as that. Here however, there are all these constraints that are beyond my concepts at the moment.

Edited by Invisigoth, 26 August 2014 - 04:31 PM.


#6 sflatechguy

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 07:02 PM

Again, I can provide some general guidelines, but without more info about your network environment, I can't get into too many specifics.

 

Google Hangouts uses it's own proprietary protocol (which I don't see listed), TCP and UDP. Facetime uses SIP and RTP, TCP and UDP.

 

Controling torrents using QoS is extremely difficult, as it uses both TCP and UDP and often hundreds of different ports. Your best options is to give VoIP and Web browsing the highest priorities, and leave torrents along.

 

So you could create one rule for VoIP, using RTP, TCP/UDP, maximize throughput and voice options; and another rule for Web browsing, using DNS, TCP/UDP, maximize reliability and video options. Typically, voice is the highest available 802.1p priority, followed by video.

 

Hope that helps.



#7 Invisigoth

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 12:50 AM

Hmmm... Okay if I may circumvent the required solution here in this topic post by adding a TPLink switch (non wireless) right after the ZTE modem and explore its QoS which I seem to have a feeling might be easier to set up. But before I get into that I have a concern about the hops. Would two hops over a setup of modem-router-WLAN affect the throughput speed for applications?

I will have to put in a good amount of time on the ZTE's QoS to learn about this, furthermore I found this data sheet for the modem http://www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/236452219

#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 01:24 AM

You would have to put the ZTE in bridge mode, and use the TPLink as the router so you can access its QoS features. Essentially, the ZTE would simply pass all the Internet traffic from your ISP straight to the TPLink, which you would then use to connect all your wired and wireless clients. You can't leave them both configured as routers -- that would double NAT your home network, which would create problems not so much with data speeds as with certain services not working properly. You'd have to set up port forwarding on both, which for some things like torrents would be a pain to try and configure. http://www.practicallynetworked.com/networking/fixing_double_nat.htm






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