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Black screen: GPU or PSU


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#1 Benjamms

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 10:11 PM

Sorry in advance for huge block of text as this problem has been frustrating so I'm trying to give as much detail as I can.

So this problem actually started two weeks ago and has been gradually getting worse. I had built this computer about two year ago and it's been running perfectly for games and everything. Two weeks ago my screen suddenly went black saying "no signal" while gaming , the computer was still on, just not the monitor. The only way to get it back on was to turn off computer by switch and back on again. Now it has gotten to the point where I can't even get past the starting windows page without screen shutting off.

I was told it was prob the psu so I took the case apart today and connected the battery to only the GPU, CPU, HDD, and one fan. Wala! It finally kept my computer on for web browsing and what not. But once I tested running a game, the problem reoccurred again. I noticed that when the black screen occurs, the fan on the GPU also stops running, so I would assume not enough energy is going to GPU, or if the GPU has a problem..

Buying new parts and changing them is easy for me.. Only problem is I don't know which one of the parts is most likely the culprit!

Thank you'

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#2 kokomodrums

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 10:46 PM

True, it will be difficult to isolate what the issue is without first swapping in either a new GPU or PSU. Have you tried removing just the GPU and running the system for a few hours to see if the problem comes back (assuming you have onboard graphics)? If yes, it's more than likely the PSU. If you don't have any issues without the GPU plugged in, it still could be possible that the GPU is what causes the PSU to falter, but I don't think that's very likely.

 

My "gut" feeling is that this is a faulty or overworked PSU. And honestly, it's generally cheaper to replace a PSU, so if you were to pick one to try first, that would be it. Make sure you get one with enough power to handle all your components, there are some good PSU calculators online if you need assistance.

 

Although before you order anything, I would remove/reinsert the GPU and make sure it is seated nice and solid, and also re-plug in the power connector, and possibly swap power connectors if you have an extra.

 

One other consideration: have you considered overheating?? You may want to monitor your temps to see if they are excessive, especially right before the computer crashes.

 

Just some more ideas for ya!


-- Matt


#3 Benjamms

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 11:30 PM

I have thought about overheating, although I do not know what the "regular" temperatures are or what temperatures are considered overheating while running games and other things. What program would I also use in order to monitor it?

EDIT: So I usually play league of legends. I ran a heat check program, was stable at 57 degree Celsius throughout the game until monitor shut, so I'll rule out overheating.

Edited by Benjamms, 24 August 2014 - 10:49 AM.


#4 kokomodrums

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:59 PM

Did you try my other two suggestions? Running with onboard graphics for a few hours, and reseating the GPU etc?


-- Matt


#5 Wesker1984

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 09:22 PM

True, it will be difficult to isolate what the issue is without first swapping in either a new GPU or PSU. Have you tried removing just the GPU and running the system for a few hours to see if the problem comes back (assuming you have onboard graphics)? If yes, it's more than likely the PSU. If you don't have any issues without the GPU plugged in, it still could be possible that the GPU is what causes the PSU to falter, but I don't think that's very likely.

 

My "gut" feeling is that this is a faulty or overworked PSU. And honestly, it's generally cheaper to replace a PSU, so if you were to pick one to try first, that would be it. Make sure you get one with enough power to handle all your components, there are some good PSU calculators online if you need assistance.

 

Although before you order anything, I would remove/reinsert the GPU and make sure it is seated nice and solid, and also re-plug in the power connector, and possibly swap power connectors if you have an extra.

 

One other consideration: have you considered overheating?? You may want to monitor your temps to see if they are excessive, especially right before the computer crashes.

 

Just some more ideas for ya!

 

 

The only problem I have with your diagnosis of an overworked or failing PSU is that the PC is still running while there is no graphical output, surely an overworked PSU would simply cut out and the whole computer would be off? It is more like to be either a Video Card issue, or maybe the monitor cable/monitor. If I were you OP I would try replacing the Graphics Card. If you get a new Graphics card make sure your PSU can handle it though. It is unlikely to be your monitor seeing as it displays but you never know...


Edited by Wesker1984, 07 September 2014 - 09:27 PM.


#6 kokomodrums

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 11:36 PM

surely an overworked PSU would simply cut out and the whole computer would be off?

 
Not necessarily, PSUs have been known to cause intermittent issues. It could just be an issue with one of the rails (like the one providing power to the GPU). But, it most definitely could be the GPU. That's why instead of a diagnosis, I just said "my gut feeling".  :wink:
 
My "gut feeling" is that a GPU is more likely to be "all or nothing" than a PSU, which are known to cause flaky, intermittent issues like described. But again, the only way to know for sure is by swapping out parts (unless you have a PSU tester I suppose, or are handy with a multimeter...and even then...).


-- Matt





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