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Think the drought in California is just a lot of media hype?


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#1 Animal

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 06:08 PM

See for yourself.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/california-drought-before-after-photos-show-falling-water-levels-lakes-reservoirs-1461928

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#2 cat1092

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 07:47 PM

No, it's not hype, Animal. It's for real. 

 

This has been going on for at least two years & on the opposite side of the US, we're seeing & feeling the effects, in rapidly rising food prices. 

 

I've also seen videos of dry orchards in California being bulldozed over, the trees dead from the drought. 

 

This is a serious issue & measures should have been taken many years ago to prevent, or lessen the effects of this. Such as the piping in of water from where it's less needed, or diversion of runoff water to these rivers. These projects takes years to complete, however both short & long term solutions needs to be implemented. It's not like there's a labor shortage in the country, rather a shortage of collective minds to take action & the misuse of tax dollars, which were collected here & should benefit it's citizens first & foremost. 

 

Of course, the real solution is to get some much needed rain, unfortunately we have no control over that. We felt the effects of that one summer in the very early 2000's & lake levels drastically dropped, many ponds to half their levels. Fortunately, things rebounded for following year. 

 

The situation isn't looking good for now, that's for certain. 

 

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#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:00 AM

California goes through these cycles and NEVER has been able to store enough water to last more than two years with reduced rainfall/snowpack.  Many large dams have lost their major hydroelectric power due to low water and drinking water reserves are in short supply and reducing quickly.  Consumers started two years ago to ask for conservation, the consumers complied and were struck with a rate increase. Repeat again this year and NO ONE has any grass anymore and we still need to cut back MORE, AGAIN.  The shoe drops in January when they raise the rates again.  Much of the drinking water goes to the sewer and after treatment, should be returned to the ground water via surface storage instead of pumping offshore.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 03:11 AM

It doesn't help either that the state is over populated, very much so & though California itself is inside the top 10 economies globally, their finances are terrible. No, that's not going to produce rain, but still, the state is in a mess on all sides. Recently, the state's prison system has been under the threat of forced takeover, they're well over populated, yet they've closed prisons. How's that going to improve conditions? Seems that building new ones is the way out, plus utilize house arrest more for low level offenders. 

 

California also has one of the most generous welfare programs in the nation. For these folks, is there really any incentive to return to work? 

 

And I agree with mjd420nova, another year of this, it's going to be much worse, not only for those residents, but further higher food prices for the entire US. And they're actually selling water to other states? Yes to the sewer water idea, a similar plan is used here, treated water flowing back into streams to be reused. 

 

It's also time to look at the population issue. How many more immigrants are they going to take in? If the current trend continues, the state is going to be in a dire emergency & will have no choice but to stop the taking in of immigrants & possibly even asking some to move elsewhere. Some may voluntarily move to get away from the issue, but I guarantee it won't be those on welfare. 

 

Rather than building pipelines across the nation to supply oil to foreign nations (why otherwise is the proposed Keystone pipeline going to the Texas coast?), it may be a better idea to consider a couple for California that carries badly needed water. Surely there's areas that has an abundance of water that needs the money, plus there's areas with high runoff rates, surely some of that water can be diverted to where it's needed. 

 

And finally, speaking of California selling water to other states, Las Vegas, if their water situation is that bad, why the growth? A bad situation is only worsening & California needs to put their feet down....no more developing, if they're supplying the water that they don't have for themselves. 

 

It's time to come up with some solutions, both short & long term, and fast. Time isn't on California's side. Nor the rest of the nation, whom is affected by higher food pricing & eventual availability. Washington needs to come together for the good of the people & with a plan of immediate action. This situation cannot be ignored. With all of the technology & resources we have, there has to be a way to improve the crises. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 rp88

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:42 PM

The definition of drought is "less rainfall and water stored in reservoirs THAN USUAL for the area". A few years back there was a drought in northern england, this being england all the pictures from the north during he drought showed reservoirs with some water in them, damp fog and light rainfall, it was still a drought because it was less rainfall and lower reservoir levels than usual. One can have a drought, as we sometimes do in britain in spring, where it is raining heavily but reservoirs are extremely low thanks to having snow not rain the previous winter (snow containing far less kilograms of water per unit volume than normal rain). Ofcourse when it is raining the drought will begin to revert to normal but it can take months to make up the water levels that would usually have been present at the start of the period when drought was declared.


Edited by rp88, 01 September 2014 - 05:44 PM.

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#6 cat1092

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 07:22 PM

I have a feeling it's going to take many months to bring the California out of the drought. It's going to take more than one winter or rain too, more like a couple of years of above average amounts of rainfall. These lakes & riverbeds are getting dry, some smaller creeks are dry or just a trickle, plus add in the fact the the state is the largest in the US, population wise. The next closest state to it is a distant 12,000,000 back in Texas, which in itself (the gap), there's only four more states above that number in total US population & the majority aren't close. These are 2013 Census numbers. 

 

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/usa/states/population.shtml

 

That's a lot of folks on their scarce water supply, and until I seen that chart, wasn't fully aware of how large California is. Yes I knew it was the largest, but not by a almost a third more (percentage wise) than the next on the list. Plus all of the produce grown there, that takes lots of water, there were orchards being bulldozed over last year. It's only getting worse now, and every year that passes like this, the further damage is going to be two or threefold more. 

 

My guess is that some folks has to be considering moving by now, and likely many already has. To where there is an ample water supply. 

 

Though part of this couldn't be avoided, some could had, although years ago, by placing the needs of the existing population in front of massive business growth. The state needed lakes more than big business & now the population is paying the heavy price for poor future planning in the 60's & 70's. Just as one major city (Greensboro) in the state where I live did. Airport expansion & heavy business growth on the western side of the then heavily wooded side of the county, which the city later took in, could have been a place for a massive lake, that would have served the population needs. There were already plenty of jobs, the city just got too greedy in trying to compete for being large. 

 

Now the city is paying high premiums for extra water from surrounding communities & is in turn passing the cost onto the residents, not only in steep water bills (they also charge for rain runoff), but city taxes also. Charging for rain? Yes, it's true. And the fact is, the city is heavily dependent on others, whom can cut the valves off should it come to push or shove. Included in those city taxes are the expenses for several large loans that will likely never be repaid in full. All for the sake of big business, the city in recent years was inside of the top five of most abandoned. 

 

That's just one city. It would be virtually impossible for an entire state to pull off the same feat, plus some of the neighboring states has their own water issues. 

 

May be time for some Californians to take matters in their hands & consider digging wells. 

 

Cat


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#7 Plug 1

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 11:40 PM

This has truly been a fascinating and informative discussion.  Although I don't have anything substantive to add, I would like to thank the posters above for their insights. 

 

And yes, the link is striking. 

 

As your average East Coaster, those drought headlines are difficult to fully put into perspective.  Now I have some.  Thanks to all.



#8 cat1092

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 12:12 AM

 

 

As your average East Coaster, those drought headlines are difficult to fully put into perspective.  Now I have some.  

Yes, it's really hard to put into full perspective, being we don't live in the area, both of us living on the East Coast. 

 

One reminder of this though, is at the grocery store. Skyrocketing food prices, in particular beef & most any grain products. Some produce native to California is not available to us. And because some farmers see they can make more profits in selling to California food distributors, some will choose that route, as really, they can call their own price. These folks has to eat & some farmers from other states are exploiting this by doubling prices. In turn, some local produce is higher in cost, have already heard one farmer at a market refer to their drought as the reason he "has to" charge $3 per pound for tomatoes & some other locally grown veggies. Even though these farmers may not sell the first thing to the folks in California, it's being used as an excuse to raise prices. 

 

Some of this may be true, but some is also smoke & mirrors. If one isn't a supplier, then there's no need to jack up pricing for that reason. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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