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Router connected to UPS reboots on power failure


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#1 w411

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:12 PM

NetGear WNDR3700 is directly connected to an APC Back-UPS XS 1300:

 

https://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BX1300G&tab=documentation 

 

Every time the power fails, the router restarts but all other devices stay up.

 

All I can think of is the highest selectable low voltage (low range goes from 77 to 88 volts) is too low for the router and the router loses functional power before the UPS kicks in?

 

Anyone else have any ideas?



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#2 Animal

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:29 PM

I know this is stating the obvious, but experience tells me I need to get it out of the way. Have you confirmed that the router is plugged into one of the 5 outlets on the left side as you look at the rear panel. Which are the only 5 that are battery backed up outlets. Not one of the 5 on the right which are surge protected only?

And yes I have in the past had the same experience with a Bay Networks router that rebooted with power blips that didn't drop enough to kick in battery backup. So your theory could be correct. It's also possible one of the outlets could be wonky. Try changing the outlet for the router with something less susceptible to power fluctuations. If you have all 5 backed up outlets in use. If all 5 are not in use use a different outlet for the router.

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#3 w411

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 03:27 PM

Definitely was connected to a UPS outlet, and tested more than one outlet.  This is a new UPS that replaced a previous UPS, and the same issue happened with the old UPS but it was about 4 years old and wasn't holding much of a charge anyways so thought the new UPS may fix the issue.



#4 Animal

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 07:12 PM

Interesting. Unfortunately I don't have a clue other than what appears to be an issue with the router itself now.

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A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


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#5 technonymous

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 08:55 PM

Devices like a router are more sensative to power outages. A computer's power supply has a little more leeway there as far as voltage and time goes. They have a lot more components and capacitors in their own power supply that don't die as quickly as a device with just a power adapter coil.






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