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Question about setting up outlook to receive webmail


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#1 ammobake

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 04:04 AM

So my company uses a webmail server and anyone on the domain has an easy time setting up outlook.

But anyone at remote sites not on the domain have two options. Webmail through the browser or on our outlook in a secure Citrix session logged on to the server.

Basically no one at remote sites can use outlook? It didn't make sense to me so I experimented setting up outlook through the webmail server manually.

But it wouldn't work. I tried a variety of different ways but I couldn't get it to work. Is there a way to make this work if you aren't logged in to a domain?

The only thing I haven't tried is setting up outlook to treat the webmail server as an internet email account like pop2. But I doubt it would work.

I'm trying to get outlook working to save people the hassle of going through a slow Citrix connection. And our webmail can be frustrating through the browser. Especially since the remote sites use slower internet connections than our main office.

But when I try to set up outlook manually nothing works.

The machines I'm working with are brand new HP pro book laptops on windows 7 and outlook is the 2010 version.

The way our email works on the domain is through our exchange server.

Anyone using iPhones or iPads can easily set up an exchange account that gets email through the webmail server which is why I'm confused about it not working on a laptop through outlook 2010.

Any help is appreciated. I hope I explained it we'll enough.

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#2 AngryRaisin

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 09:02 AM

you don't happen to be working for San Bernandino do you? Anyway to set up outlook you do automatic detect account type and hit next when it prompts for a username with your email address filled in change that to   domain\username    like  sbcounty\johndoe  and check the save password box. That should do it.



#3 ammobake

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 03:08 PM

First, thanks for the response.

 

To your question - No, I'm actually in Alaska.

 

I'm going to try and set it up in the way you described and I'll let you know how it goes!  For whatever reason they've made people use webmail or citrix for years.

 

For anyone familiar with Citrix, it can be slow even on a fast broadband connection - just because of how the client session is created and how it communicates to the server and shared drives.

 

Webmail isn't difficult to access but anyone whose used it on a daily basis - it is SO much slower than on a locally installed Microsoft Outlook.

 

Plus people want to be able to use Outlook for it's other benefits (easily accessible contact information, calendar for scheduling to name a couple).

 

Just something as simple as making an attachment on webmail can take 10 times longer than on outlook.

 

It's like every time you click on something in webmail it asks you permission if it's OK.

 

Trying to help our people out, you know?

 

-Chris



#4 sflatechguy

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 11:28 PM

I take it the IT folks won't give you the server info to configure your Outlook. However, you should be able to obtain the server address in Citrix. In Citrix/Outlook, go to File and select Account Settings. Click on the email account and click Change. The mail server address you are connected to will appear in the Server field.

 

Once you have that, you may be able to use Autodiscover to connect Outlook to the Exchange Server, by simply typing in the email address and password, if you are set to use single sign-on for both the domain and email. You would choose the Microsoft Exchange option when setting up Outlook. If autodiscover fails, you will have to manually set up the Exchange connection.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/add-an-email-account-by-using-advanced-settings-HA010371264.aspx

 

Depending on how the Exchange server is configured, you may have to go into More Settings and set the proxy server that is being used. Determining that is a bit trickier; you may have to try using the Remote Connectivity Analyzer, and run the Outlook Autodiscover and/or Exchange ActiveSync Autodiscover test. It will fail; but if you review the logs you'll find an entry or entries beginning with msstd: That will be your proxy server.

Then, follow these directions, substituting your Exchange server and proxy server names for the ones used in this tutorial: https://help.1and1.com/e-mail-c37589/exchange-2013-c85122/exchange-and-outlook-c85144/manually-set-up-an-exchange-2013-account-in-outlook-a792415.html

 

Failing that, you may have to use POP or IMAP to configure Outlook to connect.



#5 ammobake

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 04:17 PM

So this is the latest..

 

I'm told that the the network isn't configured for "Outlook Anywhere" because it isn't set up yet on the server.

 

This helps to explain why I couldn't get it working last week and why autocomplete wouldn't work.

 

My hunch is that they are trying to avoid an excess of server traffic by keeping "Outlook Anywhere" disabled server-side.

 

But all of our office ipads and iphones easily have email set up through the webmail server without any problems. It seems odd that we wouldn't be able to figure out an option for using locally-installed Outlook on a laptop (or at least some kind of locally installed program) when all those other devices work great without needing "Outlook Anywhere".

 

Does anyone know of a way to configure Outlook 2010 on a Windows 7 laptop without needing to go through "Outlook Anywhere" (not logged in to a network/domain)?

 

Is there some kind of other program we could use to link up to a webmail server?

 

Thank you!



#6 sflatechguy

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 04:31 PM

The problem is Outlook Anywhere uses RPC over HTTPS, while phones connect using ActiveSync. It's two different protocols. Outlook clients don't use ActiveSync, so without Outlook Anywhere enabled, there's no way to connect the Outlook client to the server. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2859522

 

You might be able to use POP or IMAP, if those are enabled on the Exchange server -- they are disabled by default on Exchange servers. The problem is you won't get the full functionality out of Outlook if you connect this way.



#7 ammobake

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 10:03 PM

So it turns out POP or IMAP won't work because of the server config.

 

I tried configuring microsoft outlook to log in to the webmail server using HTTP.  Got everything configured via this link...

http://www.wikihow.com/Configure-Outlook-for-RPC-over-HTTP

 

The username and password prompt opens up, type in password, click OK but comes up over and over.

 

I have yet to find an email client for Windows 7 that can connect using activesync.  But I haven't tried using apple mail yet either.  Not sure yet if there is even an apple mail client that works on PC.

 

I tried to find an activesync plug-in for Thunderbird but didn't find one.  If there were, I guess you could theoretically set up Thunderbird with a workable config.  But no dice~!

 

More work on this tomorrow!

 

The reason I'm working on this solo is because our Network admins and our IT staff have been "uncooperative" I guess you could say with regards to making this easier on our users.

 

I don't think the server config is going to change anytime soon for a variety of reasons.  But that doesn't mean I shouldn't do everything in my power to make it easier on our users.

 

A local email client would just streamline things and we wouldn't rely on an extremely slow, third party utility just to check our email if we are working from outside the network/domain.

 

In my opinion, If it works and makes things easier without bogging down the server I don't see why we shouldn't at least try to make it happen.

 

I haven't given up on this just yet but I'm definately not expecting alot of help other than this website! LOL.



#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 10:26 PM

Because it's an on-premise Exchange server, HTTP won't work -- you'll need an encrypted connection, like Outlook Anywhere. That's why it keeps prompting you over and over -- it's trying to set up an encrypted connection and can't.

 

Not sure how much luck you'll have finding email clients that connect using Exchange ActiveSync. I've seen Thunderbird plugins for connecting to Exchange servers, but they don't use EAS, which was designed more for phones. Like POP and IMAP, EAS doesn't support everything that MAPI and and RPC over HTTPS support, so even if you did find a client that uses ActiveSync, you'd find some Outlook features unavailable or they won't work as expected.

 

It looks like they've locked down your email access to just phones, webmail, and Outlook via Citrix. I feel your pain. If I run across anything that looks like it might help, I'll post back. Good luck.



#9 ammobake

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 01:15 PM

The latest is that IT saist here is no solution.

 

My own research tells me Outlook 2013 does include Activesync/EAS functionality and is compatible with Windows 7. 

So it may be workable client but it would depend on the software installed server side.

 

Davmail may also be a workable option.

 

Of course, our IT people see all of this as a waste of time.  Constantly sending me emails about stuff I already know or questions about stuff I've already explained.

 

But that's just the way it goes!  I can experiment with Davmail solo and see how it goes.

But I doubt they will give me permission to install Outlook 2013.



#10 sflatechguy

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 01:22 PM

I can assure you ActiveSync won't work with Outlook. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2859522

If your IT department won't cooperate, you will probablly have to explore another solution.

#11 ammobake

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 02:14 PM

Thanks all for your input.

 

I have found a solution - at least one that works on windows 7 and it doesn't require you to be on a network/domain.  This method works without outlook anywhere needing to be activated on the server.

 

This method also limits traffic on the exchange server because it communicates with the webmail server only - which is a huge plus.

 

This is kind of a matter of pride for me - because everyone told me it wouldn't work (even the IT people we pay hundreds of thousands of dollars every year).

 

The solution was Davmail.

 

I configured Davmail to communicate with our webmail server only (not our exchange server).  To do this, you need to configure davmail with "EWS" exchange protocol.

 

Keep all the ports in davmail as they are.

 

You need to configure davmail to communicate with the OWA (exchange) URL.  My URL was similar to this...  https://webmail.yourcompany.com/owa/auth/logon.aspx

 

Under "network" tab in davmail select "use proxy settings" and use proxy user "username" and type in your password.  No domain information is necessary (because it isn't involved).

 

Davmail autoconfigures the ports for you.

 

At this point davmail is configured.  Close it out - it will continue to run in the system tray.

 

Next, install Mozilla Thunderbird Mail.

 

After you install the email client, you will configure all server names to "local host" - which tells thunderbird to go through davmail to connect.

 

incoming mail - POP3         server: local host          port: 1110

outgoing mail - SMTP         server: local host          port: 1025

 

This link was helpful with thunderbird set up....

http://davmail.sourceforge.net/thunderbirdmailsetup.html

 

That's all you need to do.

 

Thunderbird will slowly, but surely, populate your inbox with all your current emails.  This portion of the process goes quicker with a broadband ethernet connection.

 

I should also note that Thunderbird may not populate your inbox all at once.  I've noticed that I've had to close it out a couple times and reopen thunderbird mail before it would continue populating.

 

Also - I've noticed that thunderbird initially shows all populated emails as "unread" but this is hardly an issue for me.

 

The fact that it works at all is pretty amazing.

 

For those who are trying to get an email client on their machine from outside their network - I highly recommend you to check into the latest version of Microsoft Outlook. 

 

Of course check with your IT staff first.  The latest version of Microsoft Office may not be compatible with your machine.  And even if it is, whether or not it would work from outside the network depends on the config of the exchange server.

 

However, the latest version of Microsoft Outlook has a feature called EAS (Exchange Active Sync) which allows you to set up an email account similar to apple mail on a mac (similar to how  you would configure an iphone).

 

The issue is that the latest version of Outlook isn't compatible with alot of operating systems still in use in the private sector.  Alot of businesses are still using Office 2010 - which obviously doesn't have Activesync capability.

 

Plus, the latest version of Outlook using EAS may not even work depending on the exchange server configuration - which is information most end-users may or may not be privy to.

 

If you are trying to get an email client installed on your computer without being on a network - my method will work but it's just easier to check with your IT folks first to see what options are available.  Some exchange servers have "outlook anywhere" enabled.  In that case you wouldn't need to set up thunderbird mail because Outlook 2010 would work fine whether on the network or off.

 

If they say it isn't possible though - follow my instructions and tell them you proved them wrong.

 

Thanks everyone for your input.  Hope this helps others in the future.

 

-Chris






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