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Where to Open and Where to Install Apps.


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#1 ohgee

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 03:53 PM

I have just this week clean- installed Windows 7 Pro on a 250GB drive, and have not, as yet, installed any applications.
    
In the past, on another system, I had divided a drive into (2) partitions; a (C:) 'WinXP' partition, and a (D:) 'Application'
partition.  I placed.each application in its own folder in the (D:) partition, and opened it there.  During the installation
process some files, of course, get automatically placed in (C:) Program folders.  The (D:) drive held approximately
(30GB)- worth of application files.

A computer repair professional told me, since during the installation process the Program files automatically get
installed in the (C:) drive, that I can, in theory, get rid of the (D:) drive altogether, along with its application files.  This
sounds scary to me.  I would think, at least, that the Application folders could be placed in an external drive.

As a result, my being a Win7 newbie, I certainly could use some help as to:
    1)  Where to download and open Application files.
    2)  Where do the resulting Program files automatically get installed (in what folders).

 

Oddly, I've spent days on Internet search, and Win7 tutorials, with none treating Items 1) and 2).  Your help will certainly

be appreciated. 

 

Thank you.



 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 04:54 PM

Opinions vary...but, for a Win 7 install, I install Windows and all applications on the same partition, which is created somewhere between 50-60GB.  That's more than large enough for installed apps, critical updates, and programs.

 

I would (after Win 7 is installed) then create a second partition, using the rest of the drive.  On this partition would go all data files (backups, docs, graphics, videos, etc.).

 

The location of downloads...depends on which browser you are using.  Firefox creates a Download folder and they will go there by default, unless user changes the preferred location.  IE operates differently, see http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/find-a-file-you-have-downloaded .

 

Louis



#3 ohgee

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 05:41 PM

Louis, thank you for replying.

 

Actually, I put all data files and backups in an external drive.  I plan to dual boot the Win7 with

Ubuntu 14.04.

 

I'm not sure I explained myself well.  Let me give a typical example; say to install Acronis.  I

would do the following:

     1- Download the Acronis zip file and put it in a folder.

     2- Extract the zip file in the same folder

     3- Open the extracted file and install Acronis in the same folder.

     4- During the installation process, some Program files automatically get installed in some (C:) Win7

         Program folders.

 

My question is; Where do I put the folder noted in 1), 2), and 3) above.

                           Where does Win7 put the Program folders noted in 4) ?



#4 hamluis

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:48 AM

I'm not understanding still...I seem to have a mental block on whatever it is that you are asking.

 

FWIW:  Zip files do not install in the same manner as program files which use an installer.  That's why some programs give users the choice of the .zip format OR the installer format.  See Answer for a better explanation than I can offer.

 

Louis



#5 ohgee

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:56 PM

It does sound confusing, and for that I must apologize for the following lengthy explanation.

When I want to get an application I perform the following steps:
     1- Download the application file and temporarily save it to my Download folder.
     2- I then make a new folder, give it an application name, and date of download.
     3- Transfer the unopened downloaded application file to this folder.  This is now my application folder.
     4- I then take this application folder (which is holding the unopened downloaded  
         application file) and place it in my (D:) Application partition.
     5- This now is where I first open the downloaded application file for installation.
     6- During the Step 5) process I am asked where I want the application installed.  I choose
         to have it installed in the same application folder.  As a result this folder now contains
         the opened installation files.
     7- Also, during the Step 5) process, the application's Program files, of course, automatically
         get installed in the (C:) Windows partition.

To summarize; the downloaded application is opened and installed in its own application folder.
This folder is located in a separate (D:) Application partition.  This partition holds approx. (126)
applications for a total of (29GB).

As I noted in my first submission I am told, once the application Program files automatically get
installed in the (C:) Windows partition, as noted in Step 7), that all of the application folders (located
in the (D:) application partition are useless, and they can, in theory, be discarted- that Windows
doesn't use them in order to run the programs (since it already holds the essential Program files).

I have the following questions:
     1- Is what I was told true.
     2- If yes, could I relocate all of the application folders (residing in the (D:) partition) to an external
         drive
, and treat them as archive files, or even get rid of them altogether.
     3- If my whole procedure (Steps 1 to 7) is too cumbersome, what is a more efficient method for
         downloading, opening and placing applications.  Where, exactly, would the opened application
         files then be located.



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 05:39 PM

Perhaps I can clarify this, since I use a somewhat similar system, except that it is on separate drives.

 

I have a folder called 'Software downloads' into which I put any installers that I want to keep. To take the audio editor 'Audacity' as an example, since it downloads as a .ZIP file. The downloaded file 'audacity.zip' goes into a folder I create and call Audacity, and I then use the 'Un-zip here' command so I finish up with three files in this folder : 'audacity.zip', 'audacity.exe' and 'lame.exe' (file names shortened to protect the innocent). I then run the audacity.EXE file to install the program.

 

Audacity then goes and installs itself in the C:\Program Files(x86) folder along with much of the rest of my applications and that is the program installed and usable.

 

I could then return to my D:\ drive and delete all the Audacity files because these ones play no role in my use of the application, and I could certainly get rid of the 'audacity,zip' file as I have the unpacked contents. In point of fact. like you, I keep them but this is against a possible future need to re-install.

 

Only the files in C:\program Files or C:\Program Files(x86) are involved in running any of your applications - there maybe one or two exceptions to this, I have three and these are all fairly specialised applications which don't like being in a 'Program File' folder.

 

You can safely delete, archive, write to, say, DVD, and then delete these installation files, or do what you want with them. But you definitely do not need them to run the software.

 

You might find it helpful to go into the 'Options' on whichever browser you use and set it to ask for a location every time you you download something. This way you can even create a new folder at the same time.

 

Chris Cosgrove


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#7 ohgee

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:19 PM

Fantastick, Chris!!

 

This is exactly the information I was seeking.  In fact, your idea of copying all of the installation folders to DVD is a great one, and which I will certainly do.

For me, this will accomplish (2) things;

     1- I can get rid of the (D:) Application partition, and use the (29GB) of space for other things.

     2- Since these installation folders also hold the original downloaded application files (such as .zip, etc.) I can use the DVD to copy them for use in my

         new Win7 OS.

 

Thank you, and to Louis for your help.  This forum is new to me, and it will certainly be one of my prime help sources.



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:50 PM

Glad that it is cleared up for you, and since nobody else appears to have said it - welcome to BC !

 

Chris Cosgrove


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